Skip to main content

Full text of "North Carolina Christian advocate [serial]"

See other formats


I 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/northcarolinachr60unit 



r 



p 



RortD Carolina 



Page Three 




te of Earnest Protest was issued last 
: United States against the high 
n with American commerce 
Hons. The note was ad- 
^nd is, of course, in- 
as to the attitude 
d in war to- 
rs. While 
and 



Official Oipt of tk Western Gortfe £aro!ina£onferoice 
IBetbocfist episcopal Ourcb, Soutl) 



jjl\f. OOf) 



Volume LX 



Greensboro, N. C, Thursday, January 7, 19 





1 




A SONG OF TRUST 



GERTRUDE BENEDICT CURTIS 

I cannot always see the way that leads 

To heights above; 
I sometimes quite forget He leads me on 

With hand of love; 
But yet I know the path must lead me to 

Immanuel's land, 
And when I reach life's summit I shall k now 

And understand. 

I cannot always see the plan on which 

He builds my life, 
For oft the sound of hammers, blow on blow, 

The noise of strife, 
Confuse me till I quite forget He k noWs 

And oversees, 
And that in all details, with His good plan 

My life agrees. 

I cannot always know and understand 

The Master's rule; 
I cannot always do the task He gives 

In life's hard school; 
But I am learning with His help to solve 

Them, one by one, 
And when I cannot understand, to say, 
"Thy will be done!" —Selected. 



j/ 6 f 3 y 



Hi 



Number 1 






NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 7, 1915 



.advocate 



at Greensboro, N. C, as 
. the second class. 



Editor 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

xear $1.59 

x Months 75 

sl'o all preachers of the Gospel, per year 1.0* 

Make all remittances t« 
Christian Advocate, - Greensboro, N. C. 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

It is not our custom to discontinue subscriptions 
when the time paid for expires, without notice. Sub- 
scribers who do not wish the paper continued should 
send notice to discontinue direct to the office. Oth- 
erwise they will be expected to pay for the paper 



OUR BUILDING FUND 

It is important that those who have made 
pledges to our Advocate Building Fund should 
make payment of at least one-half of the 
amount. This first installment was due Novem- 
ber 1st, 1914. Many made their settlements 
promptly at the Annual Conference, while quite 
a number have sent us their checks since Con- 
ference. There are a good many, however, who 
have not settled and this interferes with our 
plan to make a payment o"n our note early in 
the year. If those who are still due will strain 
a point and send us the money during this 
month it will be greatly appreciated and will 
enable us to cut down our debt and stop a 
heavy interest account. 

We are still receiving pledges and are glad 
to report that the amount still unprovided for is 
less than $1600. Will not every Advocate sub- 
scriber come to our help now and send us a 
contribution to help free our Advocate building 
from this indebtedness? Send $50.00, or $25.00, 
or $20.00, or $10.00, or $5.00, or $2.50, or $1.00, 
if you can send no more. The year 1915 must 
see this debt all wiped out. Then all our people 
will rejoice to know that we have an Advocate 
building and printing plant here in the growing 
city of Greensboro, valued at $40,000, all our 
own and free from encumbrance. If any Con- 
ference enterprise ever made effectual appeal 
to our people this should. 

Statements have been mailed recently to all 
who are still due, and we trust it may not 
be necessary for us to remind these with another 
statement. Make check payable to 

H. M. Blair, Tr., 
Greensboro, N. C. 



OUR ADVOCATE DAY 

As already announced, Sunday, Jan. 17th, 
has been set apart as Advocate Sunday. This 
is by agreement of the presiding elders, lay 
leaders and the Board of Missions in their meet- 
ing at Salisbury last month. Pastors and con- 
gregations are expected to co-operate in the ef- 
fort to induce all families who are not taking 
the paper to do so, also to bring up those who 
are in arears and advance them for a year on 
their subscriptions. It is expected also that the 
week following shall be used for a thorough 
follow-up canvass, so that those not reached in 
the congregation may be sought out and can- 
vassed. The plan is a concerted one, and it is 
hoped that no one will be allowed to escape. 

By observing the day and week it is hoped 
first that the full number of new subscribers al- 
lotted to the charge will be secured, so that 
when the reports are all in we shall have a very 
large increase in our circulation. The second 
aim is to secure the back dues and renewal sub- 
scription of those who have fallen behind. The 
lists have just been sent out to all the pastors 
and by reference to these lists it can be deter- 
mined who to approach either for a new sub- 
scription or for collection of back dues and re- 
newal. If in any case the lists sent out are not 
complete, we shall be glad to furnish supple- 
mentary lists. 

An unusual number were carried over last 
year who failed to send in their renewals. Now 
we want this canvass to bring these up or clear 
the list of them, for we are not able to carry 
them. Let the week, January 17-24, be Pay-Up 
Week for Advocate Subscribers 

Such a list of delinquents as we are carrying 



will soon prove a millstone about our necks fi- 
nancially, and would drag the whole business 
into bankruptcy. So we are compelled to in- 
sist that preachers and people take the matter 
a little more seriously than ever before, and 
get ready to make the day and week count. We 
shall expect reports sent in immediately after 
the fourth Sunday and it is our purpose to pub- 
lish the result in each charge the following 
week, showing the number of new subscribers se- 
cured, also amount collected on renewals. 

Of course those who have already been at 
work can include what they have previously se- 
cured. We are trusting our faithful pastors 
and laymen to rally to the Advocate and make 
Sunday, January 17th and the week following 
the greatest event in the history of the paper. 



ENCOURAGING SIGNS 

The editor is greatly heartened for the work 
of the new year on account of the many en- 
couraging letters coming from the men in the 
field. These men not only express great inter 
est in the effort to extend the circulation of 
the Advocate, but a deep concern for the suc- 
cess of the new movement in the interest of 
evangelism, and all the interests of the King- 
dom. As a rule our preachers are not asleep, 
nor are they indifferent to the obligations 
of service upon them. Their hearts are burn- 
ing with a zeal for the salvation of the indif- 
ferent and godless multitudes, and as these 
fires kindle from heart to heart we expect to 
hear very soon of the "times of refreshing 
from the presence of the Lord." 

There is no surer contagion than that of re- 
ligious zeal, and the normal place for the kind- 
ling of this zeal and the breaking forth of this 
contagion is right in the heart of the pastor 
himself. The two most blessed and effective re- 
vivals ever conducted by the writer occurred 
in March, a very unusual season, and each 
began in the regular services without previous 
notice. It could not be said that they occurred 
without previous preparation, for the preach- 
ing and pastoral work for weeks had looked 
almost exclusively in this direction. In each 
case the beginning of the meeting was like a 
case of spontaneous combustion. The Spirit 
was there, and men and women responded to 
His call. There was no trouble about attend- 
ance, nor were any heard to say that the meet- 
ing had ■ been undertaken at the wrong time. 
From the service in which the revival fires 
broke forth the meetings were continued from 
day to day and it seemed an easy and joy- 
ful task to persuade the unsaved to seek sal- 
vation. "The Lord added to the church daily 
such as were being saved," just as truly as 
on the day of pentecost. 

Somehow we feel that in many places in the 
bounds of our Conference similar occurences 
are going to be recorded before many weeks. 
These men who write to the editor of their 
yearning and travail of soul, must surely have 
a message for their people that is not aimless 
or without meaning. They are not going out 
with the sword of the Spirit to fight as one 
that beateth the air. It will not be long till 
we hear the note of victory if we quench 
not the fires that are already kindling in our 
hearts. 

One of the revivals to which we have referred 
occurred in a large country congregation, where 
roads were muddy and the people were scat- 
tered. Let there be no hesitation or discour- 
agement because of untoward circumstances. 
"Where the Spirit of the Lord is there is lib- 
erty," and the spirit of liberty means power. 
Such power will always surmount difficulties 
— such faith will remove mountains. 

Oh, for a mighty vision of opportunity and 
an inspiration for joyous service that will set 
all our hearts on fire and bring the joyous 
note of victory for which we pray and listen! 



DEATH OF REV. JOHN N. COLE, D. D. 

Rev. John N. Cole, D. D., of the North Caro- 
lina Conference, and since the year 1904, Su- 
perintendent of the Methodist Orphanage at 
Raleigh, passed peacefully to his reward on 
Friday morning of last week, at 6 o'clock. Dr. 
Cole died at the Charlotte Sanitarium, where 
he went about one month ago for treatment. He 
had been in declining health for some two 



years, and early last year spent a short while at 
the Sanitarium in Charlotte, returning to his 
work very much improved; but the improve- 
ment was only temporary, a return of the same 
ailment resulting in his death. . 

Dr. Cole was a sweet-spirited man, and drew 
others to him. As a pastor, for many years, he 
was immensely popular, combining in an un- 
usual degree the gifts of the acceptable preach- 
er and pastor. His pulpit ministrations were 
always tender and persuasive. He knew how 
to temper rebuke with the spirit of love and 
sympathy, and always performed the duties of 
his high calling in obedience to the apostolic 
injunction, "with all longsuffering. " His re- 
movals while in the pastorate were almost al- 
ways occasioned by the time limit. His people 
were apparently reluctant to give him up as he 
was indisposed to break the sacred ties which 
bound them together. 

This fine disposition which had so disting- 
uished him in the pastorate made him an easy 
mark for the trustees of the orphanage, when, 
in 1904, they found a vacancy at the head of 
this institution. Here his fine qualities soon 
shone out in his tender care for these fatherless 
ones, and his administrative ability was even 
more marked. The crowning glory of his beau- 
tiful life was his ten years of service at the 
head of the orphanage. What a pity it seems 
to those of us who remain that he should have 
been taken away in the midst of his plans for an 
even greater work! But God knows best, and 
will carry on his work, while one by one he 
takes his servants home. 

The editor of the Advocate came into inti- 
mate touch with the deceased during the first 
year of his ministry, having served that year a 
neighboring charge. From that day, through 
all the years, we have never ceased to love 
him and we chronicle his death with profound 
sorrow. 

Dr. Cole is survived by his widow, who was* 
Miss Elizabeth Marshall Jones, of Mecklen- 
burg county, Va., and six children, riameh-, 
Miss Mary Cole, of Raleigh ; Mrs. Plato T. Dur- 
ham, of Atlanta, Ga. ; Mr. John Nelson Cole, 
Jr., of New York City; Miss Marshall Cole, 
Miss Alice Cole and Mr. Henry P. Cole, of 
Raleigh. To these and the host of friends 
throughout the state who share in this sorrow, 
we extend our sincere sympathy. 



IN THE BEATEN PATH 

Rev. Luther E. Todd, in his remarkable 
book, Evangelism Exemplified, calls attention 
to the danger which ever confronts the church- 
es in our towns and cities. This danger is 
that of going along from year to year in a 
beaten path. We fall so easily into the rut of 
formal service— conventional worship— and, 
with great labor and some sacrifice, we accom- 
plish nothing, for the reason that we are really 
aiming at nothing. 

We need a Men and Religion Movement, not 
of the sort which contents itself with efforts 
at social service alone, but of the sort exem- 
plified by the four men who brought their 
friend, the palzied man, to Jesus, and got help 
for the soul — the forgiveness of sins — as well 
as healing for the body. We need a type of 
Christian work in personal service that will 
smash all conventional rules and so-called re- 
ligious proprieties in order that a sinner may 
be brought to Christ. 

If the church is to be saved from the rut; if 
it is to be held out of this beaten path which 
leads to death, there must be organization for 
definite work. The church is already organ- 
ized to death, some say. But this is true only 
because such organization has no reference to 
the matter of personal evangelism. It is pos- 
sible for men and women to wear themselves 
out, in so-called religious work, and yet have 
little or nothing to their credit in the way of 
real achievement for Christ. They keep up 
their societies and religious organizations much 
after the order of the social club, and they 
have their reward. They serve at their social 
banquets, pink teas and great bazaars, working 
very diligently and unselfishly, and they have 
their reward ; but it is not the joy which thrills 
the heart of one who, either singly or in com- 



January 7, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Three 



bination with others, leads a soul into the light 
of pardoning grace. 

Why can we not organize our people for per- 
sonal work in soul-saving? "Why can we not 
send them forth, two by two, to take definite 
hold upon the unsaved by prayer and conversa- 
tion and bring them to the house of God and 
to personal decision for Christ? We could well 
afford to transform our Women's Societies, our 
Epworth Leagues, our Sunday schools and all 
church organizations into working centers for 
the promotion of evangelism. Making this their 
primary work, they will surely not fail in any 
other object for which they labor. 

Mr. Todd very aptly says: "Cities 
and towns are teeming with people just 
outside the kingdom of Christ. The church- 
es in' these places go along from year to 
year in a beaten path. Some of them have 
difficulty in paying expenses and fail to show a 
reason for their existence. And all the time 
multiplied thousands of un- Christian and non- 
affiliate human beings crowd by and around 
and sometimes through these same churches 
without the least danger of being taken up 
and assimilated by them. There is enough 
wasted dynamic in the lives of such people to 
give the church sufficient momentum to bring 
in the kingdom of Christ in a single decade." 

Let us not waste our energies longer upon 
efforts and methods that are too indefinite and 
aimless to either save ourselves or our fellow- 
men. 



STATE CONVENTION ANTI SALOON 
LEAGUE 

On another page will be found the full pro- 
gram of the State Convention of the North Car- 
olina Anti-Saloon League which is to be 
held in Raleigh on Wednesday and Thurs- 
day, January 13-14. This will be one of the 
most important meetings ever held in this state 
in the interest of prohibition, and we sincere- 
ly hope that every organization entitled to rep- 
resentation will have a full delegation. 

The last lick that will finally dispatch the old 
serpent in North Carolina is to be struck by 
this legislature. There is no doubt about this 
lick being struck provided the pressure of pub- 
lic sentiment is placed upon the members of 
the House and Senate. Much depends upon the 
attendance and interest in this convention. Let 
the people wake up and see that the shipping 
of liquor into the state and making every ex- 
press office a dispensary be stopped by a special 
law which can not so easily be evaded. 



NOTE AND COMMENT 

From Many Places in the state the report 
comes that large amounts of liquor were re- 
ceived by express for the holidays. While this 
is true no doubt it is evident that drinking 
and drunken carousal have been far less in ev- 
idence than in former years. If the present 
legislature does not prove a dismal disappoint- 
ment we expect these shipments to be cut off 
in the future and then we will have the op- 
portunity of seeing a thoroughly sober holi- 
day season in North Carolina. 

• * • # 

Hard Times are very much the product of our 
manner of living. An exchange puts the matter 
about right in the following economic lecture: 
"Yes, these times are hard, we throw away 
ashes and buy soap; we raise dogs and buy 
hogs; we grow weeds and buy vegetables; we 
catch fish with a four dollar rod; we build 
school houses and send our children away to 
be educated; and last but not least, we send 
our boys out with a $40 gun and a $20 dog to 
hunt ten-cent game. Yes, these are hard 
times, but whose fault is it? Don't place all 
the blame on the president and the trusts." 

# * # • 

The Belgian Relief Fund has done great good 
and will bear good fruit, not only in lives saved, 
but in the promotion of the brotherly spirit 
among the nations, as well as helping to pre- 
vent a condition of anarchy. The American Con- 
sul general at Brussels, is quoted as saying: 
"The American commission got to work on- 
ly just in time. If the food had been delayed 



a few days more the effect might have been 
tragic. You cannot preserve law and order 
among starving people. Brussels is now calm 
and orderly and there is not likely to be any 
change in the present situation for some time 
to come. ' ' 

The Manufacture of Cotton in North Caro- 
lina is increasing very rapidly; and yet the 
facilities in the way of undeveloped water 
power, available raw material, etc., are such 
that it is not extravagant to say that we are 
only beginning an industry in which we may 
yet lead the world. The figures given out by 
the Bureau of the Census on the supply and 
use of cotton for the cotton year ending August 
31st, shows that the increase of the consumption 
of cotton in this state was from 653,350 bales 
in 1913, to 906,177 bales in 1914, or 38.7 per 
cent. The figures show that this is the best 
percentage of gain of any state in the Union. 
Gaston County leads in the state, with 507,792 
spindles and the State ranks second in the Un- 
ion in the amount of cotton consumed, Mas- 
sachusetts being first. South Carolina comes 
third and Georgia fourth. North Carolina pro- 
duced 935,000 bales last year, just 28,823 
more than she consumed. 

# # # * 

A Significant Item is given in a dispatch 
from Columbus, Ohio, under date of Decem- 
ber 23rd. It says: "The Hoster-Columbus 
Breweries Company, a $12,000,000 corporation, 
went into the hands of receivers today on orders 
of the Federal District Court. Decreased de- 
mand for beer, adverse legislation and the 
voting "dry" of many States and counties in 

the last eight years were given as the causes." 

# # * # 

The Hobson Resolution to submit a consti- 
tutional amendment for national prohibition, 
came up in the House of Representatives on 
December 22, and is said to have been de- 
feated. This is true in the sense that there 
was lacking the two-thirds vote required by 
the law for submission. Nevertheless, the vote 
stood 197 for and 189 against, showing a ma- 
jority in its favor. This is a great triumph 
for the cause of national prohibition and we 
have no doubt that, before many years, the 
measure will pass with a large majority in its 
favor. The cause is growing and will grow 
with a vastly accelerated ratio in the future. 
Party lines were wiped out in the struggle. 
Democratic Leader Underwood and Republican 
Leader Mann fought shoulder to shoulder at the 
head of the forces opposing the resolution. And 
when the vote came of the 197 standing for the 
resolution, 114 were Democrats, 68 Republicans, 
11 were Progressives and four were Progressive 
Republicans. Two of our North Carolina rep- 
resentatives, Small and Pou, spoke and voted 
against the measure. It is said they are not 
expecting to stand for re-election. It would seem 
so. Flushed by what they term the moral vie-, 
tory of mustering a majority vote in favor 
of the Hobson resolution, prohibition leaders 
frankly avowed their intention of making the 
eradication of rum an issue in the next presiden- 
tial campaign. Not only do they assert their 
determination to put the great political parties 
on record, but declare they will carry the 
fight into every congressional district and seek 
to force senatorial candidates to take a posi- 
tion in every state. They propose to make 
their fight both in the primary and general 
elections. Agents of the liquor forces, while 
openly claiming to have swamped the drys, 
privately concede that the closeness of the first 
vote ever taken on the issue in Congress is 
not encouraging. 

# * * * 

Regarding Neutrality, Dr. Newell Dwight 
Hillis, pastor ofPlymouth Church, Brooklyn, is 
reported to have said : ' ' When the time comes 
that I have to add God and the devil together 
and divide by two in the name of neutrality, 
I'll withdraw. I am not going to sacrifice my 
manhood for what some people call neutrality. ' ' 
Dr. Hillis said that for several months he had 
felt that the world must hope for German de- 
feat, although, in one of his lectures before 
the war, dealing with "The New Germany," 
he praised German progress, German ideals, 
German inventions and German principles." 



A Note of Earnest Protest was issued last 
week by the United States against the high 
handed interference with American commerce 
by the belligerant nations. The note was ad- 
dressed to Great Britain and is, of course, in- 
tended to settle the question as to the attitude 
of all the powers now engaged in war to- 
ward the commerce of neutral powers. While 
the note is a friendly one it is yet firm and 
positive in the statement of our ground of griev- 
ance, and it is hoped that the result will be the 
withdrawal of vexatious interferance with 
American merchant ships. The document points 
out that complaints on every side and public 
criticism in the United States hold the Brit- 
ish policy as directly responsible for the de- 
pression in many American industries, a situ- 
ation the seriousness of which must be appar- 
ent to Great Britain. Feeling has been aroused 
on the subject to such an extent, the commu- 
nication adds, that the American Government 
feels compelled to ask for definite information 
as to Great Britain's attitude, in order that it 
may take such measures as will protect Ameri- 
can citizens in their rights. 

# # # >* 

The Lord Smiled Upon Us last year in giv- 
ing us the most favorable season upon the 
whole that this country has ever enjoyed, as 
evidenced by the unprecedented crop which 
was harvested. Secretary of Agriculture Hous- 
ton, on December 30th, announced that the 
value of all farm crops, farm animal products 
and farm animals sold and slaughtered aggre- 
gated $9,872,936,000. That was $83,000,000 
more than the grand total for 1913, the pre- 
vious record year. It was more than double 
the value of all farm products in 1899. 

Crops this year were valued at $6,044,480,- 
000 and farm animal products at $3,828,456, 
000. The value of crops was slightly less than 
in 1913, on account of the reduced value of 
cotton. The corn and wheat crops, however, 
were the most valuable ever produced. They 
brought the year's crop value total to only 
$88,279,000 less than the total for last year, 
despite the loss of more than $300,000,000 in 
the value of cotton. 

The value of the principal farm crops this 
year was: Corn, $1,702,599,000; wheat, $878,- 
680,000; hay, $779,968,000; cotton, $519,616,- 
000; oats, $499,431,000; potatoes, $198,609,- 
000; barley, $105,903,000; tobacco, $101,411,- 
000 ; sweet potatoes, $41,294,000 ; rye, $37,018,- 
000; sugar beets, $27,950,000 ; rice, $21,849,000; 
flax seed, $19,540,000 and buckwheat, $12,892,- 
000. 

# * * * 

That Church and State should be kept en- 
tirely separate in matters affecting religious 
rights and privileges, and especially religious 
beliefs, is a very wholesome doctrine. The 
people are justly jealous of any tendency to 
subvert this principle of American government. 
We think, however, that some of our Baptist 
brethren are over sensitive on this subject. 
When the danger to this principle is used as 
a plea to keep the Bible out of public schools 
or to bar the State from helping to support 
institutions that are taking care of helpless chil- 
dren for which they have not otherwise provid- 
ed, it looks a little like the "dog in the manger" 
trick. The people who oppose State appropria- 
tions to our orphanages would likewise oppose 
the State under a proposition to take over the 
whole business. We may be mistaken, but it 
looks this way just now. 

# * # • 

The War Situation in Europe has changed 
but little in France and Belgium for the last 
month. The Allies have been pressing hard 
against the German line all along, but have 
made almost insignificant advances. However, 
they have kept the enemy busy, which was 
doubtless their object, so as to prevent the with- 
drawal of men with which to strengthen the 
army of Von Hindenberg, operating against 
the Russians in the east. It seems that dur- 
ing the past week or more the Russians have 
resumed the offensive and have pressed their 
way through the Carpathians, again putting 
the Austrians to a rather disastrous rout, while 
they have completely checked the German ar- 
my in front of Warsaw. 



Page Four 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 7, 1915 




TS OF 



{By W. A Harper, President Elon College 



Education's Permanent Elements Make It 
Worth While. It is the permanent elements of 
education that justify the vast expenditure 
of money for it and the enlistment of hundreds 
of thousands of teachers in its army of work- 
ers. More than 400 colleges and universities 
with more than ten thousand teachers and 
more than 400,000 students, with endowment 
aggregating more than a billion dollars, make 
up the higher educational budget of the United 
States. More than 18,000,000 pupils taught by 
more than half a million teachers receiving 
salaries out of the public exchequer aggregat- 
ing more than $500,000,000 annually represent 
numerically the American people's interest in 
secondary education. And these expenditures 
in money and in human energy are increas- 
ing every year. It is because we have seen, or 
think we have, certain abiding elements in edu- 
cation that we are willing to invest men and 
money in it in such bewildering proportions. 
We have found, or think we have, that educa- 
tion pays well for every dollar invested in it 
and for every particle of neural force devoted 
to its acquisition. The American people sit 
at the feet of the pedagogue during the forma- 
tive period of childhood and adolescence and 
far into that of early man- and womanhood, as 
no other people ever have, and they do it be- 
cause of the permanent elements they have seen 
in education. 

I. Practical Information 

Education Should Add to Practical Effi- 
ciency. Among these permanent elements 
the practical American would place foremost, 
practical information, knowledge equipping di- 
rectly for some vocation, skill contributing to 
wealth production and industrial success. We 
have departed far from the old notion that a 
gentleman should have no business. The Amer- 
ican gentleman with no business is your tramp 
or jail-bird. We believe that work ennobles 
man and consider every loafer a parasite, 
whether he be rich or poor. Education ought 
to be practical and it ought to assist in achiev- 
ing material success. It always has and it al- 
ways will, or it will cease to be. In insisting 
on the practical benefits of education, how- 
ever, there is involved the danger of stunting 
the finer sensibilities of the soul and reducing 
life to materialism only. We must all make our 
living — that is materialistic — and that living 
should be the best of which we are capable — 
that is crass materialism, and yet I believe m 
it. I would include in "best" however many 
things the extreme materialist would rigorously 
exclude. I would not be content with muck- 
raking only; I would occasionally peep at the 
stars. 

But Its Insistence Should Be on Man, Not 
Practical. In our insistence on practical edu- 
cation we should put the emphasis on educa- 
tion, rather than on practical. Man is the 
most important element in education, not prac- 
ticality. You can never make a first-rate law- 
yer out of a man God has set aside to till the 
soil, and the best way to make of him the most 
efficient farmer possible is to give him acquaint- 
ance with life in the large as well as with the 
practical, technical training required of the 
farmer. The best man is your broad, cath- 
olic, sympathetic man, and this holds true 
whether he be a farmer, a mechanic or a pro- 
fessional man, and this type of man, the man 
who makes his living and at the same time 
lives a life, this type of man will help forward 
the life of every man who feels the impulse of 
his energy or even remotely is touched by his 
influence. 

We Must Not Convert Our Schools Into 
Apprentice Shops. The narrow specialist, the 
man who has confined himself to one thing to 
the exclusion of everything else, who has seen 
in education only practical information and 
in life only his own vocation — that man may 
make his millions, may stand at the top of 
his profession, but his own life will be poor 



in the elements that really make living worth 
while — poor in the things that elevate human 
life above mere animal existence and bring it 
close to God. This is not decrying success. 
This is not decrying material success. It is 
pleading for man as the master of materialism 
as against man enslaved to his own acquisitions. 
And it is a plea that needs to be made. Short- 
sighted educationists, mad with desire for pop- 
ularity, are enunciating in catching phrases 
the gospel of mammon and the mammonites 
are saying "amen and amen." They would 
eliminate from our schools all but practical stu- 
dies and they would introduce vocational train- 
ing everywhere possible. They would convert 
our schools into apprentice shops and put un- 
der the ban of disapproval every ideal save 
that of materialistic success. We need appren- 
tice shops, but we need schools also. Our schools 
will quicken our ideals. Our apprentice shops 
will enable us to work out in material form 
these ideals. But if our schools become ap- 
prentice shops, where will our ideals be ? 

The Old Countries Are No Safe Criterion 
For America. The advocates of vocational 
training and practical education as the only 
worthy aim of our educational system do not 
help their cause when they cite the examples of 
foreign countries as justifying their reform. 
They forget that life in those countries is 
cast in certain moulds, and that there is 
very little, if any, transference from one stra- 
tum of society to another. Sons and daughters 
of the nobles will be nobles and the children of 
artisans will follow their forebears. Not so in 
America, where even the humblest can aim at 
the highest station. In the old country there 
is very little need for the quickening of ideals, 
but in America such quickening is the secret 
of our glory and the destiny of our future. Yet 
even in the old countries, there exist two typws 
of education- — practical for the children of the 
poor and the artisans, and classical for the edu- 
cation of the professional and higher classes. 
We shall likely come to some such arrange- 
ment in this country, but as between the voca- 
tional school only and the classical school only, 
there can be but one choice for a nation whose 
national greatness is dependent upon the ideals 
that stir the heart's blood of its every citizen. 

The Real Practicalness Which We Need. 

And yet I am willing to grant that educa- 
tion should give practical information, that it 
should give special training, that it should yield 
expert skill for the work of life, but not to 
the exclusion of those studies which really 
enrich life and render it worth while. We 
need specialization and vocational training ana 
practical education and we will have them, but 
in their getting let us not forget that idealism 
too is a potent factor in human progress, and 
even a more potent factor than realism, which 
would not be and could not be without idealism 
as the fuel producing its energy. Let us put 
our emphasis on man and life first and on 
specialism and making a living next and in 
sweet self-forgetfulness realize our best selves 
and live our best lives. Education animated 
and controlled by such a spirit cannot but yield 
us the best results in terms of life and in point 
of practical information — not the information 
that narrows and belittles man, but that broad- 
ens and uplifts and exalts him. 

II. Mental Power 

His Mental Power Ennobles Man. There 
can be no more inviting claim set forth for 
education's necessity than that it generates 
mental power, for it is to mental power that 
we must look as the source of human progress. 
From his eyes down no man is worth mure 
than $1.50 a day, but he who is thoroughly 
developed from his eyes up may command a 
salary mounting up to startling proportions. 
Mental power — that is the difference ; and that 
is the sort of power we have the right to ex- 
pect from our educational system; 



Power and Skill Are Far Different. We have 

the right to inquire of any institution offering 
us its services or seeking our support what it 
can do in the matter of generating mental 
power. Does it propose to take the undeveloped 
human being and to make him into a man re- 
markable for his mental grasp? If so, it is 
entitled to our respect and should have our 
support. If it merely proposes to train him 
more deftly and skillfully as an animal, with 
little or no attention to mental power, then 
we should look elsewhere for education. There 
is a vital difference between skill and power. 
Skill enables us to utilize power, it is the 
belting that transfers the power from the dy- 
namo to the wheels and the machinery of the 
plant, but is powerless without the dynamo, 
the source of the power. We need to con- 
sider this carefully in deciding as between 
schools and colleges. Your special schools put 
the emphasis on skill; your colleges put it on 
power. Our normal schools train — they do not 
educate. They give skill — they do not give 
power. The normal school reviews carefully the 
ground covered by the grammar and high school 
curriculum. It adds to that methods of teach- 
ing and practice in teaching, but makes no ad- 
vance in general education. Normal gradu- 
ates for the first few months outshine in the 
classroom the college graduates, because of their 
skill. They are limited in power, however, and 
their superiority is brief and momentary. As 
soon as experience gives the college graduate 
skill, her magnificent power places her in a 
different class as a teacher and she far out- 
distances her normal trained competitors. It is 
power that counts, not skill, because power will 
express itself and skill is its handmaid. 

A Case In Point— Ponder It Well. What 
has been said of teaching applies equally well 
to every other vocation. The other day I read 
the curriculum of a far-famed technical school 
— a curriculum that was designed to produce 
civil and electrical engineers. It had the smell 
of the shop. I could see almost nothing in it 
but machinery and the whirr of the wheels was 
almost audible as I read. Three courses in 
English, one in Political Economy, two in Ger- 
man or French, with technical mathematics and 
applied science with shop work — that was the 
curriculum offered as constituting an education, 
with no history and no philosophy and no ac- 
quaintance with the great literature of tne 
world and no real knowledge in the liberalizing 
sense of either English, Mathematics, or Na- 
tural or Social Science. Those who are thus 
educated may repair railroads and operate ma- 
chinery, but they will never tunnel under the 
Hudson nor construct the Panama Canal nor 
invent any contrivance for the uplift of man. 
Your great engineers are they who have been 
thoroughly educated before their special train- 
ing began, whose special training has been the 
belting and shafting by which their previously 
generated mental power and acumen were ap- 
plied to the practical problems of their pro- 
fession. 

Narrow Men Always Run In Ruts. These 

principles apply to the farmer, to the business 
man, to the mechanic, to the minister, to the 
physician, to the lawyer, to every type of man. 
The narrow man must necessarily work in 
grooves. He is not broad enough to avoid ruts. 
He is powerless to strike out along new lines, 
because he is limited in horizon, deficient in 
vision, and devoid of ideals. What does he 
know of England who only England knows? 
What does he know of medicine who only med- 
icine knows? Such narrowness yields skill, 
but not power, and power makes the wheels 
of life go and keeps them from moving always 
in the same old way. 

The College Course Generates Mental Power 
Generously. The college course, following the 
proper sort of preparatory education, is able 
to develop this needful mental power. It en- 
larges the vision, quickens the ideals, strength- 
ens every mental faculty — and these are the 
main-springs of power in the mental realm. The 
college curriculum interprets the past, lays 
bare the present, and unfolds the future, thus 
laying a solid foundation for the understand- 
ing of life and the cultivation of the judg- 
ment. In history the student sees the passions 
of men at play under all circumstances. He is 



January 7, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Five 



thus enabled to weigh the problems of life in 
a sure balance, and he who knows his history 
will not be easily lured into hurtful schemes 
of wild-cat reform. Language and literature 
enlarges his life by revealing to him the aims, 
ambitions, and ideals of every conceivable type 
of man. His sympathies are thus quickened 
and he is better able to help his fellows to 
the light, basing his helpfulness on the en- 
enlarged experience in living offered all who 
ramble widely in literature's paradise of 
charm. Social Science gives him insight into 
the institutional life of man and qualifies him 
to understand the intricate problems of gov- 
ernment and society. Natural Science will 
show him nature and nature's God, and 
through this knowledge he will be prepared to 
turn natural forces into helpful channels of hu- 
man uplift. Mathematics will not only teach him 
painstaking exactness in thinking, but will en- 
courage him to expect definite results from def- 
inite forces in composition. The man who knows 
his higher mathematics — his calculus and his 
conic sections — will be no easy prey to schem- 
ers and charlatans with pet theories of great 
deliverance to man through insignificant social 
alterations. And philosophy, in which should 
be included ethics and Bible study, will bring 
him face to face with men's highest hopes and 
holiest aspirations, and no man who has felt 
his soul stir in the presence of these transcend- 
ant problems with their attendant hopes can be 
other than a new man for his experience. The 
man who has covered the gamut of life — past, 
present and future — as it is revealed in the 
college curriculum, becomes a man of power, 
of mental power. We may not be able to 
ferret out the physics or the chemistry or the 
biology of it, but we know that it is even so. 
One day perhaps we shall understand, the 
process of it, but such understanding i.-i no 
more necessary to its acquisition and enjoyment 
than understanding the manner of conversion 
is to the enjoyment of the Christian life. We 
know the college course gives this power and 
we know this power is necessary to the indi- 
vidual who is to lead the world to redemption, 
and we who are wise will never rest till we 
have it or till those dependent upon us for 
their outlook on life through our efforts have 
had it or have had the opportunity to have it. 

III. Processes of Work 

Education Cultivates Proper Habits of Work 
and Thought. If college did no more for a 
man than cultivate correct habits of work and 
thought, it would on that score only be entitled 
to every man 's respect and support. The regu- 
lar recurrance of college duties may be in- 
convenient at times, but so are the duties of the 
work-a-day world. The punctual performance 
of these duties will tell wonderfully in after 
years, when the stress and the storm of life's 
obligations gather thick and fast about us. Ev- 
ery college man has in his vocational duties 
after graduation had occasion to feel grateful 
to the routine exacted by the rules and regu- 
lations of his college days. He may have 
found them interfering with his pleasures and 
desires at times and he may have yielded a 
half-hearted obedience, when he was under ob- 
ligation to attend class rather than witness a 
great athletic contest in a near-by city, but 
in his maturer years when the self-discipline 
thus achieved has brought him the needful 
resolution for sticking to his duties in the face 
of discouragements or inviting pleasure, his 
mind will revert to the old scenes and grati- 
tude will well up within him for lasting ben- 
efits received. 

And Cultivates The Will— The Real Sover- 
eign. But it may be objected that such dis- 
cipline can be had in a store or a factory or 
the army. In a sense this is true, but with 
a vital difference. In a store or a factory or 
the army, the duties are prescribed and the 
"boss" under whatever title, enforces strict 
adherence thereto or discharges the refractory 
employee. There is not much opportunity for 
the display of the will power in making choice 
between duties that may be neglected and 
pleasures that bid for indulgence. No such sem- 
inary for the development of the will has ever 
been devised as the small college, where paren- 
tal care is showered over all and where duties 



and pleasures involving the will's cultivation 
and development are plenteously supplied. To 
this benign opportunity for strengthening the 
will through exercise the vocations of daily 
life can offer no parallel. 

And Gives Man the Keys to the Storehouse 
of Knowledge. But far more valuable than 
the inculcation of correct habits of work and 
thought is the acquaintance the college course 
gives with the field of universal knowledge 
and the processes of attacking the problems 
that demand solution at our hands. It is not 
required that a man shall remember all he 
learns during his college days in order to profit 
by his study. He may forget all the Latin and 
Greek he ever knew and not be able to demon- 
strate a single proposition in geometry nor 
perform a single experiment in science. He 
may not be able to recall the facts of history 
nor the schools of philosophy, and yet have 
in the mastery of these items of forgotten 
lore acquired such insight into the methods 
of attacking difficult problems that he is 
oualified for leadership in the affairs of life, and 
where other men falter and ultimately go down 
in the fierce onslaught, he calmly and serene- 
ly and self-eonfidently, because of his rare 
insight into the processes of grappling with dif- 
ficult situations, goes on to rich and satisfy- 
ing achievement. Let the college man who 
shrinks from the tangled maze of his daily allot- 
ment of Greek and Latin or higher mathematics 
content himself with the sweet thought that in 
their mastery he is destined to discover the 
golden threads of the most effective processes* 
of work — a discovery that shall give him a 
1 remendous lead in the race of life. And furth- 
er let him consider that his wide acquaintance 
with truth as the college course opens it up 
'rt him will stand him in good stead in com- 
ing days and enable him with little effort to 
keep himself informed or to inform himself as 
to any matter involving expert skill in investi- 
gation. The training of the will through mani- 
fold decisions, the inculcation of correct habits 
of work and thought, the insight into the ef- 
fective processes of grappling with difficult sit- 
uations, and the possession of a wide range of 
knowledge connected with the ability to investi- 
gate for himself any particular realm of it — 
these are priceless boons of college education 
and happy is the man who fortunately is pos- 
sessed of them. 

IV. General Culture 

I Said Culture, Not Polish. Note that" I did 
Tiot say polish, but culture. Polish is put on 
from the outside. It is a veneer and its thin- 
ness is easily discernible by all. But culture 
is from within out. It does not come off be- 
cause it is not put on. There are schools which 
essay to teach culture. They really teach 
nolish — what might perhaps be dubbed cultur- 
ine — and their product is distasteful to all who 
really know what true culture is. The grad- 
uates of such schools know the latest styles of 
dress and the names of the newest indigestible 
fiands and the tricks of entertaining and are 
past masters in idleness and frivolity. "They 
are experts at playing bridge, but veriest igno- 
-amuses at playing Bridget. ' ' If they are pos- 
sessed of culture, the less we have of it the 
better. 

The Real Culture of the Educated Man. The 

culture for which I plead is that which Mat- 
thew Arnold described as acquaintance with the 
best that has been thought, said, and done in 
man's history. Such acquaintance gives digni- 
ty, gives charm, gives worth to its possessor. 
Such a person is refined, genuinely refined, be- 
cause his refinement is the outcropping of his 
soul and not the habiliment of a groom. He is 
cultured, genuinely cultured, because high 
thinking always takes practical form in culture 
that cannot fail — a culture as high above that 
which comes of fashionable living as a real man 
is above his pampered horse or a real woman is 
above her fondled poodle. The man or woman 
of culture is at home in the kitchen or the 
workshop, in the parlor, in society, in educated 
circles, among the unlearned, amid wealth or 
poverty, everywhere or anywhere, and at any 
time. His culture does not puff him up, but 
makes him the servant of all his fellows, and 
wherever there is human need to be satisfied he 



has found his friend and neighbor. Such cul- 
ture comes unconsciously, as a by-product. It 
comes without being sought for, but when it 
has come, what a richness, what a joy, what a 
halo of glory it lends the life of its possessor 
and of every one with whom he comes in con- 
tact ! And nothing else can yield it so sweetly 
as the college course. 

V. Christian Character 

But Christian Character Is Education's 
Highest Contribution to Life. But the crown- 
ing contribution of education to life-equipment 
is Christian character. Nothing else can take 
its place. And the education which fails in this 
respect has failed beyond redemption. It be- 
comes the enemy of progress and should be cast 
into outer darkness. A man without character, 
without Christian character, is a danger to our 
civilization, and the better he is educated the 
greater menace he becomes to our free institu- 
tions. We want education and we will have it ; 
but we want education based on Christian char- 
acter even more, and we are determined to 
have it. We will not permit any maudlin senti- 
mentality in regard to the necessity of free- 
thought to rob us of the most vital element in 
any education — character and the God that 
makes character possible. We believe in the 
right of each individual to choose his own relig- 
ious faith, but we also believe that the educa- 
tional system should make it easy, not hard, for 
him to have faith at all. Freedom of thought 
is not synonymous with skepticism and infidel- 
ity and if it is. we will have no more freedom 
of thought. The American people have issued 
their ultimatum to this fetish of a deluded age. 
They have said to it: "You shall not crucify 
the most priceless possession of life, Christian 
character, on your cross of free-thought. Chris- 
tian character has been our nation's bulwark in 
all our generations. It has brought us to lead- 
ership in national and private life. It has been 
our pillar of fire by night and our pillar of 
cloud by day. It is to us evidence that the 
God of our fathers is with us yet, with us yet, 
and you shall not sacrifice this glorious heri- 
tage on your altar of free-thought, If your edu- 
cation cannot give us as its crowning work the 
sweet fruitage and exquisite charm of Christian 
character, then we will dwell with the Lord in 
the tents of the untutored and the unlearned!" 
So say the American people and so say we. 

Which We Are Determined Our Educational 
System Shall Yield Us. And yet there are insti- 
tutions in this Christian land, in this land where 
the sentiments just expressed represent the ma- 
ture judgment of ninety per cent, and more of 
our people, in this Christian land of whose 
Christian ideals bodying themselves forth in 
most humanitarian methods and institutions we 
are pardonably proud, in this delightful Chris- 
tian land, "Where the weak grow strong and 
the strong grow great," there are education- 
al institutions from which young men and wo- 
men, the flower of our country, each year 
emerge after four years of study and research 
with no more conception of the true God and 
of their relationship to Him or of His relation- 
ship to society than if they had been educated 
in the jungles of Africa. Isn 't it awful ? It is 
more than awful, but the day of redemption is 
at hand. We have scented the enemy and he 
is ours. We will never give up the battle, but 
will fight it out alon<y this line if it takes us 
our life-time. And when we pass off the arena, 
we will transmit the feud to our children and 
they to theirs, till the virus of this deadly here- 
sy has been absolutely eliminated from the veins 
of our national life. We value education, but 
we value Christian character even more, and 
the beauty of it is that we can have both if we 
will, and we will. 



The golden age is not in the past, but in 
the future ; not in the origin of human expe- 
rience, but in its consummate flower ; not open- 
ing in Eden, but out from Gethsemane. — 
Chapin. 



Nothing can work me damage except myself. 
The harm that I sustain I carry about with me, 
and never am a real sufferer but by my cv.-n 
fault. — Saint Bernard. 



Page Six 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 7, 1915 



I INTERESTING NEWS FROM FIELD 



NOTES AND PERSONALS 

— Rev. J. R. Warren requests us to announce 
that his post office address is Hot Springs, 
N. C. 

— The post office address of Rev- W. B. "West 
is North Charlotte, and not Charlotte, as giv- 
en in the Conference Journal. 

— Rev. James Willson and family have mov- 
ed from Woodleaf , Rowan County, where they 
have resided for some years and are now liv- 
ing on Holly Road, Southside, Winston-Salem. 

— Rev. N. R. Richardson and family were 
the recipients of a generous pounding by their 
people at Mount Holly on the day before 
Christmas. 

— Rev. Robert E. Hunt, pastor of the Alex- 
ander circuit, spent a portion of the holidays 
with relatives and friends in Greensboro. He 
was accompanied by his family. 

— The Charlotte District Missionary Insti- 
tute will be held at Marshville on Saturday 
and Sunday, January 19th and 20th. Thus 
we are informed by the District Lay Leader, 
Mr. John W. Gulledge. 

— Rev. D. P. Waters, pastor of the Boone 
circuit, reports the marriage of Mr. C. R. 
Rich and Miss Bertie Blackburn, which took 
place at the parsonage in Boone on Friday, 
December 11th. 

— Mr. Roy F. Ebbs and Miss Lucy Rhein- 
hardt, both of Marshall, N. C, were united in 
marriage at the home of the bride's brother at 
that place on December 6, Rev. W. L. Rexford 
officiating. 

— Rev. D. H. Comann, Conference Evan- 
gelist, is leading in revival services at Cara- 
way Memorial church this week. Rev. A. R. 
Bell, the pastor, reports encouraging services 
up to the time of our going to press. 

— Rev. Dr. E. L. Bain and his congregation 
at Centenary, Winston, observed the Watch- 
night on the last night of the old year. An 
interesting program was rendered and a recep- 
tion was held in the Sunday school room. The 
occasion was very much enjoyed. 

— Mr. Milo J. Jones and Miss Rosa DeLett 
Weeden, eldest daughter of Mrs. Lula Weed- 
en, of Chapel Hill, N. C, were married at 
Tulsa, Oklahoma, at sunrise, Thursday, De- 
cember 17. Mr. Jones graduated at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina in 1909. They will 
make their home at Oklahoma City, where Mr. 
Jones is practicing law- 

— Rev. Gr. A. B. Holderby, writing to the 
Concord Times about his new charge at Clyde, 
says: "We were given a cordial welcome and 
good pounding, and hot supper ready at par- 
sonage upon our arrival in Clyde the 27th 
inst., and are trusting the Lord for a great 
year in the work here, but we never expect 
to find truer friends than we left in the flour- 
ishing city of Concord." 

— The churches of all denominations in Char- 
lotte are preparing for a great union meeting to 
be held early in the spring. The meeting is to 
be in. charge of the celebrated evangelist, J. 
Wilbur Chapman, and a great tabernacle is to 
be erected. We sincerely hope and pray that 
the meeting may bring great blessing to the 
city and surrounding country. 

— A note from Rev. J. E. Woosley announces 
that Rev. E. G. Pusey, one of our most esteem- 
ed superannuates, was stricken with paralysis 
at his home in Morven on Friday of last 
week, and is now in a serious condition. The 
brethren of the Conference and numerous per- 
sonal friends of Brother Pusey and family 
will not forget to pray for him. 

— Bishop E. E. Hoss has the profound sym- 
pathy of the whole church in the great and 
sudden sorrow which came to him last week 
on account of the tragic death of his sister, 
Mrs. S. J. Kirkpatrick, of Jonesboro, Tenn., 
which occurred from the effect of burns on the 
night of December 27th. Her clothing caught 
fire while she stood before a grate. 

— Rev. T. A. Groce, pastor of Sulphur 
Springs circuit, calls upon Sunday schools to 
contribute $1.00 each to help him furnish 



Pisgah church. This, it will be recalled, is the 
church which was burned one year ago, and 
which the congregation has replaced at great 
sacrifice. The cause is a worthy one and we 
hope many Advocate readers will respond to 
the call. Address Rev. T. A. Groce, Candler, 
N. C. 

— Bishop E. D. Mouzon has accepted the 
deanship of the Theological Department of 
the Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Tex- 
as, and has removed his residence to that city. 
Referring to this the Texas Christian Advo- 
cate says: "Bishop Mouzon is greatly in- 
terested in the success of the University and 
will, during his spare time, give all the as- 
sistance and co-operation possible to the suc- 
cess of the school. He and his family are 
new in this city and installed in their new 
home, 2912 Oak Lawn Avenue, at which ad- 
dress his numerous correspondents can reach 
him." 

— Many readers of the Advocate will be 
made sad by the news of the death of Mr. 
Cyrus T. Troy, which occurred at his home 
in Concord on Monday, December 21. Brother 
Troy had been in declining health for some 
time, but had been considered ill only for a few 
days before his death. He was a native of 
Randolph County, but had lived in Concord 
for about thirty-five years. He leaves a wife 
and two children, a son and daughter. For 
many years he had been an official member of 
our church at Forest Hill. May God greatly 
comfort the bereaved family. 

— A sad note was sent out from Hickory on 
December 24, announcing the death of Dr. J. 
T. Johnson, one of the oldest and best loved 
physicians of that section of the state. Dr. 
Johnson had been in poor health for a number 
of years, but remained bright and cheerful 
to the last. The immediate cause of his death 
was pneumonia. He was nearly seventy-nine 
years old. For many years he was the superin- 
tendent of the Sunday school of First Church 
and had all his life been a faithful steward. 
No man ever made a more faithful record. 
The editor of the Advocate shares in the feel- 
ing of bereavement, for he was among our 
warmest friends. This friendship began when, 
a mere boy^ we came in contact with him and 
found in him the encouragement and inspi- 
ration so much needed at the time. We shall 
expect to meet him and greet him in the in- 
numerable company of the redeemed. May 
God greatly comfort the bereaved wife and 
two daughters that survive, also the church 
which he so much loved. 

— A note from Rev. L. P. Bogle, mailed at 
Bristol, Va., on December 28th, brought the 
sad intelligence of the death of his father, 
Rev. E. H. Bogle, which occurred at that 
place on Saturday night, December 26th. Broth- 
er Bogle was seventy-four years old, and had 
been a faithful member of the Holston Confer- 
ence for forty years. He joined the Confer- 
ence in the same class with Geo. D. French, 
T. R. Handy and Bishop E. E. Hoss. The 
funeral was held on Monday, December 28th, 
the pastors of Bristol and near-by places act- 
ing as pall bearers. The Advocate joins with 
many friends and acquaintances in express- 
ions of sympathy for the bereaved- 



Bethel and Love's Chapel — Rev. W. I. 

Hughes, pastor, writes of the warm reception 
given to him and his family on their arrival, 
December 2nd. The parsonage was in readi- 
ness, warmth and good cheer abounded. Sup- 
per was waiting. The pastor is pleased with his 
new field. The unfavorable weather has great- 
ly interfered with travel • and retarded work. 



ings, then by all the "Christmas cakes" the 
good wife could handle. Of course we have 
feasted. Now we are ready for the field- Best 
of all, is the assurance of the co-operation of 
our people in making 1915 one of the best of 
years for the churches of this charge. Last year 
it was "a hard pull" to round up as well as 
reported; this year work is being planned and 
put into execution in the beginning that such 
a thing as a shortage may be offset. 

W. Francke Sandford. 



Swannanoa — It was with reluctance that we 
left our good friends in Clyde, who had co- 
operated with us so faithfully in the past two 
years; but on November 26th we arrived at 
our new home to take up new duties and face 
solemn responsibilities. 

We were met at the train by our 
old friend, Rev. P. C. Battle and son, 
who conducted us to the large new parsonage, 
where several ladies were waiting with a good 
warm house and a steaming hot supper. A 
few nights later a crowd gathered and gave 
as a very severe pounding of many good things ; 
and things just kept coming ,for which we 
are glad. 

One round has been made preaching, holding 
church conferences and revising registers; one 
Sunday school organized and six certificates 
for membership and several new Advocate sub- 
scribers. 

As soon as we clear the indebtedness on the 
parsonage we aim to launch a new church enter- 
prise on adjoining lots for the Swannanoa con- 
gregation. 

We are going to try the every-member can- 
vass plan for the benevolences. The stewards 
have agreed to increase the salary $100.00 and 
to assess each member, who will be required to 
pay monthly. 

We are planning to do much evangelistic 
work this year. Let us work, labor and pray 
for a great year in the kingdom of our Lord. 

Respectfully, J. F. Starnes. . 



Bethel — After a sojourn of four years with 
the good people of the Henderson charge we 
found our next home would be in Haywood 
County. So we gathered up our little belong- 
ings and set out for our new field. We ar- 
rived safe and sound, finding a warm wel- 
come. The good ladies of Bethel had come to 
the parsonage and prepared a warm supper for 
us, and soon we felt at home again. 

A few evenings later we found ourselves 
being pounded but not of the kind that makes 
us grouchy. 

We are planning for a great year on this 
charge and to my mind it ought to be the ban- 
ner charge in the district. With men like 
J. M. Moore, Dr. Wilson, John West and a 
host of other good laymen you may look out for 
a fine report at the end of the Conference 
year. 

We are paving the way for the every-mem- 
ber canvass for the collections, and of course 
the Advocate will be included in this cam- 
paign. 

Last, but not least, we are praying for the 
revival fires to burn in our charge as never be- 
fore. God grant that this year may bring 
a general revival throughout our entire Con- 
ference. Sincerely, 

A. L. Latham. 



Waxhaw Charge — Our return to Waxhaw 
for the third year was one of pleasure to us, 
and our reception was none the less pleasing. 
We had hardly returned to business before 
this splendid people began to stock us up 
for the holidays. First a "big turkey" was 
driven into . our yard, followed by two ' ' pound- 



Mount Pleasant — On the 26th day of Nov. we 
very reluctantly bade farewell to our friends at 
South Main Street Church in Salisbury, and 
turned our face toward our new field at Mt. 
Pleasant. We were sorry to have to leave 
such faithful and loyal friends as We had at 
S/rath Main Street, but we stayed as long as 
the laws of our church would permit, ,io when 
the appointments were read we were , io 
ed to the Mt. Pleasant charge. Thi I is tfcfl 
beginning of our tenth year in the ministry and 
ill our work has been in the Salisbury Dis- 
trict. We were ?lad to find ourselves still 
m the same district, because we have always 
had the very best of presiding elders on this 
district and the people of the district are the 
best of people. I am glad to say that while 
we left faithful friends in Salisbury, we re- 
ceived a cordial welcome at Mount Plenant. 



January 7, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Seven 



We have been to our appointments twice and 
find the work in good condition. We have not 
had the usual pounding in a general way, but 
rather a continuous one. The people have 
been good to us and we hope to do our best 
work this year. As soon as the weather will 
permit we want to get out among the people 
and send in our number of new subscribers to 
the advocate and then some more. 

Among the first duties we were called upon 
to perform after reaching our new work was to 
conduct the funeral of one of our best men, 
! Brother J. D. Bough. He had been sick only 
a few weeks when the end came. Brother Baugh 
was a faithful man. He loved God and His 
cause and was willing to do anything for the 
advancement of His kingdom in the world. He 
was 65 years old and had been a member of 
the church since a boy. For some years he 
had been superintendent of the Sunday school 
at Friendship church. He will be greatly miss- 
ed in the community in which He lived and 
in the church where He worked. His body 
was laid to rest in Cold Springs cemetery to 
await the morning of the resurrection. May 
the Holy Spirit comfort his loved ones who 
are left behind. 

G. A. Stamper. 



Franklin Circuit — Rev. W. G. Warren, pas- 
tor, writes pleasantly of past victories and fu- 
ture hopes and acknowledges with thanks the 
generous pounding with which he was happi- 
ly suprised by the stewards of Iotla church 
recently. A check for $17.50 also came from 
Salem church. These things and other kind- 
nesses have greatly encouraged the pastor and 
he is looking forward with hope of great suc- 
cess in the work this year. 



Notice 

Several brethren have asked me to assist them 
in meetings during the year, but have not 
designated the dates. I would be glad if all 
of the brethren who want my services during 
the year would let me know just as early as 
possible when they want me so that I can ar- 
range my dates for the year. I am anxious 
to help in all of the meetings possible, but 
can not hold all of them in July and August; 
hence, will have to be engaged all during the 
year. I have a few dates yet during the 
winter and spring that I can give. Remember 
that my address is 316 Tate St., Greensboro, 
N. C. You can write either to me or Rev. E. K. 
McLarty, Charlotte, N. C. W. L. Dawson. 



Creston Circuit 1913-1914 

By an error of the Minutes Creston Circuit 
does not get credit for all that it did last year. 
Financial report, table No. 3, gives credit for 
only $159, as total paid on all the assessments. 
It should show a total of $212. No credits 
are given on Church Extension, and Support 
Fund for Children's Home. In making my 
report, I gave these two claims their proportion- 
al part of what was paid on all the claims 
as a whole. My returned check shows that 
The Bank of Ashe paid $212 to J. A. Odell, 
Treasurer of the Joint Board of Finance. 

Farmington, N. C. D. C. Ballard. 



Important Notice 

I wish to say that I do not live at Landis 
and never have. The parsonage for the Kan- 
napolis circuit is six miles west of Kannapolis. 
My Address is Glass, N. C, R. F. D. 1. 

S. L. Owen. 



Error in Estimate of Membership 

In the Minutes of our Conference for 1914, 
"Table No. 1," "Total Members this Year," 
there is an error in the addition of 523 for the 
Winston District. The total should be (accord- 
ing to the figures reported) 11,973 instead of 
11,450, making a difference of 523. There is 
an error in the figures for Southside charge of 
100. It should read 181 instead of 281. De- 
duct 100 from the error in the addition of the 
column "Total Members this year" and we 
have 423 to add to ' ' Total Members this Year., ' ' 
Question 23, Condensed Minutes, 99,667, and 
we have 100,100 in the W. N. C. Conference. 

Yours, H. K. Boyer. 



Winston District Institute 

A note from Rev. H. K. Boyer, presiding el- 
der of the Winston District, announces that 
the Missionary Institute for that district will 
be held at Lexington, January 21-22, begin- 
ning at 3 p- m., Thursday. Rev. Frank Siler 
will speak Thursday night, Dr. E. K. McLarty 
at 11 a. m., Friday, on Evangelism, and Bishop 
Atkins will speak Friday night. 



Important Social Events 

""Married, Sept. 29, 1914, at the home of the 
bride's mother, Mrs. Maggie McCracken, at 
Crabtree, N. C, in the presence of a large 
company of friends and relatives. Miss Esteile 
McCracken, to Mr. Glenn A. Boyd, of Crab- 
tree, the writer officiating. Mrs. Boyd is an 
accomplished young lady of Christian charac- 
ter, and has taught successful schools at differ- 
ent points in North Carolina. Mr. Boyd is a 
young man of excellent character, and is one of 
Haywood county's most successful farmers, and 
stock raisers. The above contracting parties 
are both loyal members of the Methodist church 
at Crabtree, N. C. 

Married, Dec. 22, 1914, at the home of the 
bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Riley M. Fergu- 
son, on Rush Fork, in the presence of a host 
of friends and relatives. Miss Fannie Fergu- 
son, to Mr. Glenn C. Palmer, of Wavnesville, 
N. C, the writer officiating. Mrs. Palmer is 
an accomplished young lady of sterling Chris- 
tian character. Mr. Palmer is the son of Sher- 
iff Palmer of Haywood County, and is a worthy 
young man of excellent character. They are 
"True-hearted, whole-hearted," faithful and 
loyal Methodists. 

May God bless and prosper these two cou- 
ples. R. C. Kirk. 



Christmas Musings 

The constant rain-fall from early morning, 
to this good hour, (1 :30 p. m.) has shut us all 
in, and kept us from delivering the two doz- 
en and one packages (prepared on last night, 
at a late hour) to the inmates of the County 
Home. And finding nothing to do, we sat in 
front of the burning coal in the grate and read, 
and read; till our eyes began to get , tired and 
smart, and then we mused, and thought- And 
while musing, we thought of many things. And 
we remembered that Emerson said, "The an- 
cestor of every action is a thought." Then 
we thought, and thought, and one of the things 
we thought was, I wonder how this man thinks, 
who spends money for cigars, and for tobacco 
to chew, to gratify a habit that is useless and 
filthy, when the same might be spent so much 
better by putting it in the Lord's treasury to 
advance His cause and help bring the world to 
Christ. And again I thought: 'Wonder how 
the man who poses as a Christian and accepts 
an official position in his church, and thereby 
assumes a leader's place as he must necessarily 
do, can get along without taking his church 
paper. And then I said to mvself, these are 
not mere pictures, pictures of the imagination, 
floating around in my mind ; but they are sad 
and fearful truths. And then again I said, 
"What a pity," and the echo came back, "What 
a pity." And as I further mused I thought, 
Wonder how the church member, he a man 
getting a salary of twelve hundred dollars, 
gets any ease of conscience if he have a con- 
science at all in the matter, to pay to his church 
claims, all told, less than five dollars a year; 
when he should pay, to say the least of it, 
not less than one hundred and twenty, which 
is only one-tenth, the old Jewish law of tithing, 
that has never, in the Old or New Testament 
been abrogated or repealed. Again, as I mused 
I said this is no imaginary picture in my 
mind, but a true and sad fact. And then the 
echo came back, "What a pity." And then I 
said to myself, somebody is responsible. And 
the echo came back, "Responsible." Brethren 
in the ministry, whose duty is it to arouse 
these abnormal, stupid, sleepy , consciences 
aboved described ? I repeat, some onfe is respon- 
sible. "Is it I?" "Is it I?" 

M. A. Abernethy. 



MISSIONARY NOTES FROM FIELD 
SECRETARY 

Dec. 27, 11 a.m., West Market St. Church, 
Chas. W. Byrd, P. C. Dr. Byrd was prepar- 
ing for his every -member canvas for first week 
in January. Th's church has so developed 
by the improved financial methods used for 
several years that the salaries and regular Con- 
ference collections are provided for in one budg- 
et, by assessment, and the Laymen 's Missionary 
Committee makes an annual every-member can- 
vas for specials. The duplex envelope is used. 
This church last year paid for missions as fol- 
lows : Regular assessment — foreign missions, 
$438.00 ; home and Conference missions, $555.- 
00; foreign missions special, $1,250.00. Her 
five Woman's Missionary Societies paid $3,782. 
The Sunday school raised $360.00 for missions 
and assessment. The minutes will show a close 
race between this church, Tryon St.. Charlotte, 
Centenary. Winston, and Central, Asheville. 

Dec. 28-31, Troutman Ct, J. J. Eads, P. C. 
Brother Eads conducted a series of institutes 
in each of his six churches. He had announced 
the services from the pulpit and in the Advo- 
cate and had had sent to all his officials not 
taking Advocate sample copies of issue con- 
taining announcement of church institutes. The 
rain and mud were much in evidence, but suc- 
cessful services were held in five of the church- 
es. I preached at each church — twice at Trout- 
man, where was held the first and last ser- 
vice. Brother Eads followed with a church con- 
ference, at which the church leaders and com- 
mittees were elected, their duties fully explain- 
ed and the fourfold Confeence plan of the ev- 
ery-member canvass adopted. Weekly assess- 
ment, individual assessment, payment preach- 
ing day, and duplex envelope used. In each 
church a steward and member of missionary 
committee will go together. 

At the last service at Troutman the stew- 
ards and members of missionary committee met 
to fix salary, apportion same with Conference 
collections on the several churches, and fix dates 
for making assessments and the every-member 
canvas for each church. By request of lay- 
men, the pastor will meet with the stewards and 
committee in making the assessments and 
launching canvass. 

Our church is very strong in South Iredell. 
The prospects on the Troutman circuit are good 
for a successful year. The laymen are co-oper- 
ating with the pastor and this means success. 

At Shiloh church Brother Eads put the 
young lady school teachers of the community on 
the Social Service Committee, who will seek to 
provide during the winter months wholesome 
reading and recreation for the young people. 
Other members of this committee will visit the 
sick and look after cases of destitution. 

The Committee on Evangelism, with the Sun- 
day school superintendent as chairman, will 
seek to hold weekly services and make the every, 
family canvas for Advocate in January. 



A Gratifying Find to 100,369 Methodists 

The correction of statistics as given by Rev. 
J. H. Barnhardt, of Washington Street 
church, High Point, is correct. Just how it oc- 
curred I do not know, but, as his report gives 
the figures at 846 members, the Journal puts 
them at 146, and printers are always sup- 
posed to "follow copy," the only place the 
fault can lie is in the one who compiled the 
statistics. As I make no claim to perfection, I 
must admit that it was an error and might 
have been avoided by a proving of the sheets 
after they were made up ; but there was no 
sufficient time to do this. 

This gives Washington Street 846 members, 
as it should have ; raises the total membership of 
Greensboro District from 9,531 to 10,231, brings 
the total membership of the Western North 
Carolina Conference up from 99,667 to 100,367. 

For one I am glad «the error was found. 
It will be gratifying to all to know that we 
have gone beyond the 100.000 mark — 367 over 
it — and still growing. This is a record in 
which Western North Carolina Methodism may 
rejoice. W. Francke Sandford, 

Statistical Sec. 



(Continued on pages 10 and 14) 



Page Eight 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 7, 1915 



Department of Woman's Work 

Conducted by Mrs. W. R. Harris, Asheville, N. G. 



THE MOTHER'S GIFT 

Baby o' mine, little baby, 
The kings and the shepherds have 

come 

To bow at thy feet and to bring thee 
Gifts, from their far-distant home. 

They show, by their gifts, adoration, 
They worship thee, Baby o' mine; 

But I am thy mother, and knowing this 
I am blessed of womankind. 

No one can love thee better 
Than thy mother, Baby o' mine. 

Thou art the Christ-Child, come to be 
The Saviour of all mankind. 

And though I can place no costly gift 

In that dear little hand of thine, 
I can give something better — a moth- 
er's love. 
Dear little Baby o' mine! 

— Mrs. Roscoe Phifer. 
Monroe, N. C. 



THOUGHTS ON THE NEW YEAR 

In the pilgrimage of life, we are in 
the act of passing another "golden 
milestone." The giving up of the old 
year is like giving up a dear friend. 
To the old year we say farewell, a 
long farewell! With glad hearts our 
greeting are to the new year and to 
it we say, all hail! When the bells 
tolled out the old and rang in the new 
it was a time of much introspection, 
retrospection and prospection. What 
has gone with all these starlight 
nights and sunny days? The hours 
have gone as birds upon the wing, 
but how hallowed the memories! How 
abiding the influence of the angel mer- 
cies of the year gone! 

The four seasons have come in 
their characteristic apparel of white, 
green, purple and gold, each glorious 
and good in its order. Fifty-two 
weeks have brought their gracious 
ministries. Forty-two golden Sab- 
baths have been like angel visits. 
Three hundred and sixty-five days and 
nights in their orderly yet changeful 
rounds have borne gifts form the Pa- 
rent of All Good to His children, 
Eight thousand seven hundred and 
sixty fleet-footed hours have run to us 
on their errands of mercy. Five hun- 
dred and twenty-five thousand and six 
hundred minutes have come out one 
by one from the gates of inner glory, 
radiant servants to us of the Most 
High God. Thirty-one million five hun- 
dred and thirty-six thousands seconds 
have been as that many good angels. 

So, we look back over the old year 
with a sense of profound gratitude. 
For its errors and sins the tear of re- 
pentance is genuine, with faith and 
hope we look forward to the new year. 



"MAY I REACH 

That purest heaven, be to other souls 
The cup of strength in some great 
agony, 

Enkindle generous ardor, feed pure 
love, 

Beget the smiles that have no cruelty — 
Be the sweet presence of a good dif- 
fused. 

And in diffusion ever more intense — 
So shall I join the choir invisible, 
Whose music is the gladness of the 
world." 

—Rev. C. F. Sherrill, in Charlotte Ob- 
server. 



TO THE WOMAN'S MISSIONARY 
SOCIETIES 

Dea." Sisters: — 

Have you reported all the boxes 
your auxiliary has sent during the 
year now about to close? I think 
there are a good many that have been 
sent that have not been reported to 
me, if I may judge by the report of 
the Children's Home in the Advocate. 
13 there not some minister's home that , 



has been brightened and cheered by 
a donation from your society, which 
you have failed to report to me? My 
dear sisters, it is very necessary that 
you make this report to me. I wish 
I might emphasize its importance. I 
may be aware that you were planning 
to send a box and yet unless I have 
it reported by your society I shall be 
unable to give you credit for it in my 
report to the Council. Only a few 
days remain but may I not hear from 
you in regard to this matter? Any 
box of supplies that you have sent 
anywhere during the year, either on 
the foreign field or in the home land 
should be reported to me AT ONCE, 
with a valuation of its contents. 

With my very best wishes for a 
prosperous New Year, I am, 
Yours in His work, 

Mrs. J. L. Woltz. 

The foregoing letter from our Con 
erence Superintendent of Supplies, 
Mrs. J. L. Woltz, came to me just a 
few hours too late for the issue of the 
Advocate of December twenty-fourth, 
for which it was intended. We regret 
exceedingly that it had to go over un- 
til this edition, but sincerely hope 
that in the two days that remain be- 
fore the closing of Mrs. Woltz' books, 
she may have a full and accurate re- 
port of every donation that has been 
made throughout the Conference. 

We would take advantage of this 
opportunity to impress upon our con- 
tributors to the Woman's Page the 
great importance of having their con- 
tributions in the hands of the editors 
on Thursday before the coming out of 
the issue for which it is intended. 
During the year many important an- 
nouncements and articles have had to 
wait a week, because of the fact that 
they were just a few hours too late. 
The material for the Woman's Page 
is mailed to the editor of the Advocate 
each Friday, and in order that a con- 
tribution finds its way to the issue of 
the Thursday following it must reach 
me not later that Thursday of the week 
preceding the issue. Do I make it 
clear? Our editor, Rev. H. M. Blair, 
has been especially kind to us during 
the two years in which we have been 
connected with the paper and often- 
times has inserted an article on some 
other page than that given to the 
work of the women, but we feel that 
we cannot ask him to do this for us, 
and we would ask our contributors to 
see that their contributions in the fu- 
turo aro ON TIME. 

We want to thank each of our work- 
ers who has contributed to our page 
during the year. We are grateful for 
what they have done, and feel that 
their co-operation and their prayers 
for us in our work has been strength- 
ening and helpful to us. We also 
would like to urge them to a contin- 
uance of their favors, and are anxious 
that every member, of every mission- 
ary society in the Conference and ev- 
ery one interested in our work will 
feel that the woman's page is open to 
them during 1915 and we want their 
co-operation in making our page one 
ol interest and profit. 

Wishing each of our readers a very 
happy and prosperous New Year, I am, 
Most faithfully and cordially, 

Mrs. W. R. Harris, 
Editor Woman's Page, N. C. Christian 

Advocate. 



THAT ANNUAL MEETING 

Do you realize, my sisters, that only 
twenty-two days remain before our 
missionary forces gather in annual 
meeting at Charlotte? Are we ready 
for it? Are you planning to go or to 
send a representative from your aux- 
iliary? It is most earnestly desired 
that there be no falling off in the rep- 



resentation this year, and the unset- 
tled conditions brought about in our 
work at home and abroad, demand 
that we meet together to plan our 
work for the new year. And we want 
to spend much time in prayer that 
God may mightily bless our coming to- 
gether, and may make the occasion 
one of the greatest for good in our 
existence. 



LOYALTY 

Just a day or two to finish the har- 
vest of this year. Missionaries and 
mission boards are hard pressed. Full 
collections are necessary if the work 
is maintained. Let the fourth quar- 
ter's report show your love and loyalty. 
Give! Give! Give! 

Mrs. R. W. MacDonald, 

Sec. Home Work. 
Miss Mabel Head, 

Sec. Foreign Work. 



ALBEMARLE AUXILIARY 

The parsonage of Central M. E. 
Church was attractively decorated with 
holly, mistletoe and Christmas bells, 
and a warm welcome was given the 
members of the Woman's Missionary 
Society, which "met there in regular 
session, on the afternoon of December 
21st. 

After devotional exercises, a short 
business meeting was held, the most 
important item of which was the elec- 
tion of officers for the new year. All 
the old officers who could do so were 
asked to serve again and were re-elect- 
ed. The society greatly appreciates the 
faithful, earnest and efficient work 'of 
its president, Mrs. R. G. Tuttle, and 
she was unanimously re-elected. 

The subject for December was "The 
Conquest of the Cross Over the Heart 
of the World." "The Coming of 
Christ" was the title of an interesting 
reading and very appropriate to the 
Christmas season. Clippings entitled a 
"Survey of the World's Needs," were 
read, and we were made to realize with 
sadness, that in many countries there 
are millions of souls who have never 
yet heard the gospel of the Christ-Child 
and that even in our own favored 
America, there are ten thousand towns 
west of the Missouri in which Christian 
preaching is never heard. 

After reading these "World's Trage- 
dies" it was comforting to be handed 
other clippings entitled "The World's 
Victories," and our hearts thrilled with 
gratitude as we thought of the great 
progress Christianity has made in the 
world and we realized that although 
so much has been accomplished, this is 
no time for resting on our oars, but 
that we must be up and doing and our 
prayer for the New Year is that we 
may be enabled to do more than we 
have ever done before to send the glad 
tidings to all the world. 

Mrs. J. M. Brown, 
Supt. of Publicity Albemarle Auxiliary. 



WANG MAY, A CHINESE PEACH 
BLOSSOM 

Have you seen the new missionary 
game, by Dr. John D. Trawick, Wang 
May, a missionary play of more than 
ordinary interest? This play is in three 
acts, and is a fine entertainment for 
missionary society, Epworth Leagues 
and Sunday schools. 

The story "Wang May," upon which 
this dramatization is based, was writ- 
ten by Dr. John D. Trawick ,of Louis- 
ville, Ky., and was published a few 
years ago. Many of the incidents are 
based upon actual occurrences in the 
experience of the author. The account 
of the attack by a mob upon4he hospi- 
tal home and the miraculous turning 
back of the mob is taken from Bishop 
Lambuth's experience in the early his- 
tory of the Soochow Hospital. The 
dramatization was worked out and pre- 
sented first by the students of the 
Methodist Training School of Nash- 
ville, Tenn. It is published in the be- 
lief that by its use many more persons 
will become Interested in the evangeli- 
zation of that great, nation of the East. 
Price 15 cents each or $1.50 per dozen. 
Order from Department of Sunday 



School Supplies, Smith and Lamar, 
Agents, Nashville, Tenn.; Richmond, 
Va., or Dallas, Texas. 

Says David Livingstone, "Can that 
be called a sacrifice which is simply 
paid back as a small part of a great 
debt owing to our God, which we can 
never repay? Is that a sacrifice which 
brings its own blest reward in health- 
ful activity, the consciousness of doing 
good, peace of mind and a bright hope 
of a glorious destiny hereafter? Away 
with the word of such a view and such 
a thought! Anxiety, sickness, suffer- 
ing or danger now and then, with a 
foregoing of the common conveniences 
and charities of this life, may make us 
pause and cause the spirit to waver, 
and the soul to sink, but let this be 
only for a moment. All these are noth- 
ing when compared with the glory 
which shall hereafter be revealed in 
and for us, I never made a sacrifice. 
Of this we ought not to talk when we 
remember the great sacrifice which He 
made when He left His Father's 
throne on high to give himself for us. 
Who being the brightness of the Fath- 
er's glory, and the express image of 
His person, and upholding all things by 
the word of His power, when He had 
by himself purged our sins sat down 
on the right hand of the majesty on 
high. 



WEEK OF PRAYER FOR WORLD- 
WIDE MISSIONS 

January 3-10 

This week, beginning with Wednes- 
day, Jan. 3rd, has been set apart as a 
season of special prayer for world-wide 
missions and the sending out of more 
missionaries and an appeal has gone 
forth for persons everywhere to unite 
in the observance of this prayer seas- 
on. Programs, leaflets and self-denial 
envelopes have been prepared and have 
been supplied to the churches desiring 
them. There will doubtless, during the 
week, be prayer services held in the 
various churches and it is hoped that 
this season of prayer will be universal- 
ly observed. The call for this week of 
prayer comes as a result of the hearty 
and cordial response in the observance 
of a similar season of prayer held last 
year. Quoting from the Missionary 
Voice of December: "Not the least con- 
spicuous result of last winter's Week 
of Prayer was its reflex influence, its 
spiritual value to those observing it. 
The opportunity was counted a privi- 
lege and not a burden. The giving was 
more liberal, it was hilarious. The let- 
ters accompanying remittances abound- 
ed with joy and thanksgiving. Read- 
ing them was like listening to a chime 
of happy bells. For the faint hearted 
who doubt it can be done we reproduce 
a few extracts: 

"Next year please make it a hundred 
misionaries instead of twenty." 

"I thank you for the opportunity of 
having even so small a share in taking 
the world for Christ." 

"It has been a great joy to us to have 
some part in this work." 

"We observed the Week of Prayer 
and consider that we have been great- 
ly blessed. 

"This was real self-denial to this 
church; but they got interested in the 
call, and I feel that the greatest good 
will come to the church itself by this 
act." 

Let the Week of Prayer for 1915 be a 
time of refreshing and set the key for 
the whole year. A real week of prayer 
at the beginning will mean fifty-two 
weeks of prayer, and the spirit and 
practice of self denial for one week will 
follow throughout the entire year. 

In addition to the special prayer for 
China which was set apart for Wednes- 
day, other topics suggested are: 
, 'Prayer for the Better Commerce in 
Africa," "Prayer for Protestant Ad- 
vance in Africa," "Prayer for the Work 
In Japan," "Prayer for the social Bet- 
te-ment in Japan," "Prayer for Chris- 
tian Education in Japan," "Prayer for 
the Italian Mission," "Prayer for the 
Brazilian Mission," "Prayer for the 
Work In Mexico." 



January 7, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Nint 



Epworth League Department 

Conducted by Miss A. Stanly Hall, Hickory, N. 0. 



DISTRICT SECRETARIES 

Asheville 

H. E. Walter Asheville 

Charlotte 

Miss Leola Hannon, Box 1056, Charlotte 
Winston 

F. T. Scarborough Winston-Salem 

Greensboro 

Miss Lillian Massey High Point 

Morganton 

Rev. J. F. Armstrong Henrietta 

North Wilkesboro 

Rev. J. M. Downum Boone 

Salisbury- 
Miss Estelle Crowell Salisbury 

Statesville 

Herbert H. Lowry Newton 

Mount Airy 

Rev. A. L. Aycock Leaksville 

Shelby 

Miss Delia Nolen Gastonia 

Waynesville 

Miss Margaret Rogers Franklin 

Superintendent Junior Leagues 
Mrs. C. M. Pickens Cornelius 



Below is list of officers of the Bel- 
mont (Charlotte) League. This list 
was sent to me at Hickory in Sep- 
tember, but was misplaced, and was 
just forwarded me last week. We re- 
gret the delay, but it was unavoidable. 

President, Miss Mamie Sullivan, Bel- 
mont, Charlotte, N. C; 1st vice-pres- 
ident, Miss Snow Davis, Belmont, 
Charlotte, N. C; 2nd vicce-president, 
Mrs. G. J. Griffith, Belmont, Charlotte, 
N. C; 3rd vice-president, Miss Grace 
Bradley, Belmont, Charlotte, N. C; 
4th vice-president, Mr. J. E. Propes, 
Belmont, Charlotte, N. C; secretary, 
Mr. G. W. Foard, 410 N. McDowell St., 
Charlotte, N. C; treasurer, Mr. Willie 
Torrence, Belmont, Charlotte, N. C; 
Epworth Era agent, Miss Lucy Sulli- 
van, Belmont, Charlotte, N. C. 



HOW A LEAGUE WAS REVIVED 

The League was dying. The devo- 
tional meetings had been "clipped" to 
death. There was not enough real life 
to attract or hold a crowd big enough 
for a good business and social meet- 
ing. The treasury was depleted.' No 
records were kept, for there was little 
of interest to record. Few more mem- 
bers could be secured. It was com- 
mon report that "there were no young 
people in the Methodist Church." Out- 
side attractions got them. 

After earnest and prayerful consul- 
tation it was decided to make a stren- 
uous effort to resurrect the League. 
A nominating committee was appoint- 
ed and a list of officers carefully cho- 
sen, which were approved and elected 
by the League. The pastor's wife was 
made President, and an earnest young 
woman, experienced in philanthropic 
work, was elected Third Vice Presi- 
dent. The first vice presidency was 
filled by a high school teacher. The 
other offices were filled by five high 
school boys. All were inexperienced 
except the President and Third Vice 
President; but they were willing to 
work and to learn, and they were real 
young folks. 

The new Cabinet met often, prayed 
earnestly for the guidance of the Holy 
Spirit, and planned for the work. Every 
available help was purchased for the 
various departments. 

Early in the fall a great rally day 
service, commemorating also the twen- 
ty-first anniversary of the Chapter, 
was held. Five charter members 
were on the program, and letters were 
read from absent ones. The roll of 
the charter members was called, and 
the minutes of the first meeting were 
read. Beautiful decorations, special 
League badges, an inspirational ad- 
dress by Dr. O. B. Waite, and the re- 
ception of twenty-four new members 



— all helped to give the League a 
splendid impetus. 

From this start work was planned 
and carried out by every department. 
Combined business and social meet- 
ings were held every month. These 
were very popular, and the average 
attendance was over fifty. 

Some of the work accomplished and 
results achieved may be briefly stat- 
ed as follows: One hundred per cent, 
increase in membership; average at- 
tendance at devotional meetings in- 
creased from twenty-five to eighty, 
summer and winter; fifty-'six Com- 
rades of the Morning Watch enrolled 
and a class in Christian Stewardship 
carried through. Several organized 
young people's classes in the Sun- 
day school each provided a special 
service in the League, including also 
the evening preaching hour. These 
were very popular and served to cor- 
relate the Church, League, and Sun- 
day school. A loose-leaf binder was 
started, and the records of the Chap- 
ter doings were kept in splendid 
shape. The support of a native work- 
er in China was undertaken, and sixty 
thank offering mite boxes distributed 
brought in generous help. Twenty 
new subscribers were secured to the 
Epworth Herald. 

The Mercy and Help Department 
was abundant in labors. Among oth- 
er things done, Thanksgiving and 
Christmas donations were distributed 
to families in our own commmunity. 
Many baskets and flowers were dis- 
tributed to shut-ins, and a valuable 
box was sent to the Dayton flood suf- 
ferers. The sum of $250.63 was rais- 
ed and expended through the various 
departments during the year. Only 
one pay social was given, and that 
was a Japanese tea. 

There are fifty-three Chapters in 
the San Diego District, with an aggre- 
gate membership of nearly three 
thousand. At the district convention 
held in San Diego it was decided that 
the San Jacinto Chapter had done 
the best work for the year, and the 
banner was awarded accordingly. It 
came as a great surprise, as we did 
not even know there was a banner to 
be awarded. It has since graced our 
walls and is a constant source of in- 
spiration to continued good work. 

We ihave tried to keep abreast of 
the times, and our latest achievement 
has been the fitting up and success- 
ful maintenance of two volley ball 
courts in the rear of the church. 

Our motto has been, "Expect great 
things from God and attempt great 
things for God." He has not disap- 
pointed our expectations. — Mrs. J. J. 
Post, in Epworth Herald. 



Positive proof from oldest Records 
that John baptized by Sprinkling. 68- 
page book, only 16 cents in stamps. 
Mahaffey Co., Box 12, Batesburg, S. C. 



GARTSIDE'S IRON RUST SOAP 
CO., 4054 Lancaster Ave., Philadel- 
phia, Na. Gartside's Iron Rust Soap 
(U. S. registered patent No. 3477) re- 
moves iron rust, ink and all unwash- 
able stains from clothing, marble, 
etc., with magical effect. Good sell- 
er, big margins. House-to-house 
agents and store salesmen wanted. 
The original, 25c a tube. Beware of 
infringements and the penalty for 
making, selling and using an infring- 
ed article. Suitable for Church Fairs, 
etc. 



MILLER, ROBINS & WEILL 

General Insurance 

General Agents Fidelity and 
Deposit Company of Maryland 
108 North Elm Street Phone 44 



Standard Form 
Collection Envelopes 



Western North Carolina Conference 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South 

HOLT'S C H A P E L 



FOR PASTOR'S SALARY 



AMOUNT 



2V> 



Date. 



191. 



Dolla 



Cent* 



MISSIONS Hi CONFERENCE COLLECTIONS 

Western North Carolina Conference 

Methodist Episcopal Church, South 
MOUNT ZION CHURCH 



Name. 
Date .. 



Dolla 



Cents 



$1.90 for lOOO, delivered 

$1.40 for additional 1000, delivered 
FOR EITHER FORM 



This price is based on using the above forms, changing name of church 
only. The large envelope is manila, and of the quality regularly used for 
Pastor's Salary collections. The small envelope can be furnished in white, 
green or cherry. Its difference in color and size from the Pastor's Salary 
form makes it ideal for Missions and Conference Collections. 

If special form is desired the price will average $2.40 for the first 1000, 
and $1 40 for additional 1000's, delivered. 

Special rates on large quantities. 

The Advocate Press, Greensboro, N. C. 



Carolina & Northwestern Rwy, Co* 

Schedule Effective October 18th, 1914 



Northbound 


NO. 10 
Passenger 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 8 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 6 
Passenger 
Sun. Only 


NO. 50 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 52 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


Chester Lv. 


7 50 a m 

8 36 

9 21! 
9 30 

10 23 

11 05 

12 05 p m 
1 08 

9 OOx 
4 09 
4 35 








4 15 p m 

6 38 
8 20 


Yorkville " 








Gastonia ' ' 








Gastonia ' ' 


4 30 p m 

5 40 

6 44 

7 30 

8 50 






Llneolnton ' ' 








Newton " 








Hiekory ' ■ 


12 05 p m 
1 08 


6 45 a m 
8 07 




Lenoir " 




L u noir " 




Mortimer ' 1 










Edgemont Ar. 










Southbound 


NO. 9 
Passenger 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 7 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 5 
Passenger 
Sun. Only 


NO. 51 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 53 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


Edgemont Lv. 


9 00am 
9 10 
11 20! 

1 35 p m 

2 35 

3 05 

3 43 

4 30 

5 05x 

5 54 

6 40 










Mortimer " 










Lenoir ' ' 










Lenoir " 


7 00 a m 

8 15 

9 00 
9 51 

11 23 


8 15 a m 

9 12 


1 10 p m 
3 20 




Hickory " 




Newton " 




Lincolnton " 








Gastonia _ ' ' 








Gastonia ' ' 






11 50 a m 
1 24 

3 10 p m 


Yorkville " 








Chester Ar. 

















Leave 



CONNECTIONS 



Arrive 



CHESTER— Southern Railway, S. A. L. and L. & C. 
YORKVILLE— Sou hern R»ilwav LINCOLNTON- 
GASTONI A Southern Railway Piedmont A- Northern Railway 
NEWTON and HICKORY— Southern Railway 



•S. A. L. 



E. F. REID. G. P. Agt. 



CHESTER, S. C. 



Page Ten 



NOETH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 7, 1915 



Our Foreign Advertising is in Charge of 
Jacobs & Co., Clinton, S. C, 

SOLICITING OFFICES: 

New York— 118 E. 28th St E. L. Gould 

Chicago — 420 Advertising Bldg.— W. B. Porcher 

Detroit— Hotel Tuller C. L. Winn 

St. Louis— 1500 Central Natl. Bank Bldg., 
, M. E. Gammon 

Nashville— 161 8th Ave. N J. M. Riddle, Jr. 

Atlanta— Wesley Memorial Bldg... J. B. Keough 

Asheville, N. C— 421 S. Main St G. H. Ligon 

Philadelphia— 1421 Arch St A. O'Daniel 

Richmond, Va.— Murphy Hotel J. W. Ligon 



❖ 

From the Field 

* t 

WESLEY MEMORIAL CHURCH 

The new Wesley Memorial Church 
is now ready for occupancy and will 
be formally entered on next Sunday. 
There are many churches larger, but 
one can scarcely find a more com- 
plete or elegant church than this. 
Form and color show that the best 
taste was used at every place in the 
entire building. 

While the congregation will leave 
the old building with reluctance and 
a tinge of sadness, they are all full 
of joyful anticipation as the time for 
entering the new church approaches. 
Next Sunday will be a great day for 
this congregation. 

The sermon at the morning hour 
will be preached by Rev. J. H. Barn- 
hardt, under whose ministry the 
church was erected. Rev. J. E. 
Thompson, his predecessor, will preach 
in the evening. All former pastors 
and presiding elders are cordially in- 
vited, and we hope that as many as 
possible will attend and take part in 
tho services. 

We extend to the editor of the Ad- 
vocate an urgent invitation to grace 
the occasion with his presence and as- 
sist in the exercises of the day. 

G. T. Rowe. 



GREENSBORO DISTRICT INSTITUTE 

The Greensboro District Missionary 
Institute will be held at High Point 
on Wednesday and Thursday, January 
20-21. .All the pastors, Lay Leaders, 
Church Leaders and Sunday School 
Superintendents are expected to at- 
tend, and any others who may feel in- 
terested and desire to attend will be 
welcome. J. H. Weaver, P. B. 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY IN- 
STITUTES 

January 

Asheville District, Central church, 13 

Charlotte District, Marshville 19-20 

Greensboro District, High Point, 20-21 
Morganton District, Forest City, 13-14 

Mt. Airy District 22-23 

N. Wilkesboro Dist, N. W'boro, 18-20 

Salisbury District 

Shelby District, Lincolnton 15-16 

Statesville District, Statesville. . .14-15 

Waynesville District, Clyde 12-13 

Winston District, Lexington 21-22 

MORGANTON DISTRICT MISSION- 
ARY INSTITUTE 
Forest City, N. C. 

Wednesday and Thursday, January 13 
and 14, 1915 

Wednesday Morning, 13th, 10 A. M. 

Devotional Exercises — Conducted by 
tho Presiding Elder. 

The, Institute: Its Object and Why- 
ness— Rev. J. E. Gay. 

Committee on Social Service: How 
It May Be Conserved — Rev. E. E. Wil- 
liamson. 

Lay Activities: How the Laymen 
May Become More Active in Christian 
Work — F. J. Chapman. 

General remarks on above subjects; 
Round Table Talk. 

Afternoon Session, 2 P. M. 

Devotional Exercises — Conducted by 
Rev. J. L. Smith. 

Our Financial Plans For the Dis- 
trict—Rev. J. E. Gay and others. 



Why We Failed Last Year — Rev. 
H. L. Powell and others. 

How We May Succeed This Year — 
Rev. A. C. Swafford. 

Difficulties: How to Overcome 
Them — Rev. Albert Sherrill. 

Night Session, 7 P. M. 

Devotional Exercises — Conducted by 
Rev. M. W. Mann. 

Christian Literature in Our Evangel- 
istic Campaign — Rev. L. D. Thompson. 

Missions: Home Missions — Led by 
Rev. J. L. Smith. General Discussion. 

Missions: Foreign — Led by Rev. 
H. L. Powell. General Discussion. 

Missions: In Our Sunday Schools 
—Led by Rev. M. B. Clegg. 

Why the Every-Member Canvass — 
F. J. Chapman and Rev. A. Sherrill. 

Thursday Morning, 14th, 9:30 A. M. 

Devotional Exercises — Conducted by 
Rev. J. M. Ridenhour. 

Every Pastor His Own Evangelist 
— L D. Thompson and H. H. Mitchell. 

The Presiding Elder in Our Evan- 
gelistic Campaign — Rev. J. E. Gay and 
Rev. Elmer Simpson. 

Evangelism in Our Sunday Schools 
— Dr. Frank Siler. 

Decision Day in Sunday School — 
Rev. B. Wilson. 

Evanegilsm: Its Scope And Its Ne- 
cessity — Dr. E. K. McLarty. 

Afternoon Session, 2 P. M. 

Devotional Exercises — Conducted by 
Rev. J. C- Richardson. 

Address on Missions — Dr. Frank Si- 
ler. 

Address, How to Improve Our Fi- 
nancial and Evangelistic Work — Dr. 
E. K. McLarty. 

Round-Table Talk— Conducted by 
the Presiding Elder. 

Night Session, 7 P. M. 

Devotional Exercises — Conducted by 
Rev. J. M. Barber. 

The Place For Specials in Our Col- 
lections — Dr. Siler. 

Address by Bishop Atkins, D. D., 
on Our Mission Work in the East. 

Rev. J. E. Gay, P. E. 
Rev. J. A. Bowles, P. C. 
F. J. Chapman, Leader. 



GIBSONVILLE CHARGE 

On Thursday — New Year's eve — a 
number of the good people of Whit- 
sett, representing nearly every family 
of the place, irrespective of denomin- 
ation, made a very pleasant visit to 
the parsonage bringing with them a 
good supply of such things as are al- 
ways useful in any home. The preach- 
er's larder was much richer because 
of their coming. This is not by any 
means the first act of kindness com- 
ing from those good people. This 
kindness is perennial. It is indeed a 
great pleasure to serve a people so 
expressive of appreciation. 

Under the new order of things Gib- 
sonville charge is moving off with 
bright prospects. With a member- 
ship aggregating 101, we have an en- 
rollment of 225 in our Sunday schools 
with an average attendance of 135. 

We are planning for and expect- 
ing large results for 1915. 

Affectionately your brother, 

W. S. Hales. 



GASTONIA OBSERVES WEEK OF 
PRAYER 

The Gastonia Gazette says: 
Beginning next Wednesday, Janu- 
ary 6th, and continuing through the 
following Sunday the members o£ 
Main Street Methodist Church will ob- 
serve the annual week of prayer, 
which is to be observed at that time 
by the congregations throughout South- 
ern Methodism. As a climax to a most 
interesting program the pastor, Rev. 
H. H. Jordan, will preach a special 
missionary sermon at the hour for 
morning worship on Sunday, January 
10th. 

The program for the season of 
prayer in as follows: 

Wednesday night, January 6th, sub- 
ject, "Foreign Missions." Leaders, 



Mr. S. J. Durham and Miss Lowry 
Shuford. 

Thursday night, January 7th, sub- 
ject, "Conference Missions." Leaders, 
Mr. G. W. Wilson and Miss Delia 
Nolen. 

Friday night, January 8th, subject, 
"The Sunday School as a Missionary 
Asset of the Church." Leaders, Mr. 
J. H. Separk and Miss Jane Morris. 

Saturday night, January 9th, sub- 
ject, '"Woman's Missionary Work." 
Leaders, Mr. A. E. Woltz and Mrs. 
B. T. Morris. 

Special music for these services will 
be furnished by the church choir. AH' 
the services will be held in the church. 



A FAITHFUL PUBLIC SERVANT 

Mr. J. L. Nelson is in Raleign at- 
tending a meeting of the Board of Di- 
rectors of the State Normal and In- 
dustrial College of which he is a mem- 
ber. The purpose of this meeting is 
to receive the reports of the Execu- 
tive Committee, the President of the 
College, and to prepare the Biennial 
Report and recommendations of the 
Board to the Governor and General 
Assembly. Mr. Nelson has been a 
member of the Board of Directors for 
a number of years, and as evidence of 
the valuable services he has rendered 
in this capacity was recently reappint- 
ed by the State authorities for anoth- 
er term of six years. In this connec- 
tion we may say that Mr. Nelson has 
been a member of the Board of Trus- 
tees of Davenport College for more 
than twenty years, serving most of 
this time as Chairman of the Board. 
During this period the college for 
lack of adequate means and equip- 
ment has experienced many hard 
struggles in the accomplishment of 
its work. To those who are familiar 
with the facts it goes without ques- 
tion that Davenport has had no more 
loyal friend and that no Trustee has 
given more liberally of his time and 
means to the advancement of the best 
interests of this institution than has 
Mr. Nelson, and no one feels a keener 
interest in its future welfare and de- 
velopment than he does. — Lenoir News. 



PROGRAM IN FULL ANTI-SALOON 
MEET 

The completed program of the 
eighth biennial convention of the 
North Carolina Anti-Saloon League 
was issued last week. The league 
convention is to be held in the First 
Baptist Church in Raleigh, with five 
sessions, the first on Wednesday af- 
ternoon, January 13, and the final ses- 
sion on Thursday night, January 14. 
A large attendance is expected. 

The purpose of the convention is 
to further the work of national pro- 
hibition and to secure the passage of 
an act by the General Assembly of 
North Carolina, which, in accord with 
the Webb law, will stop the shipment 
of liquor into the State. The pro- 
gram shows that the meeting is to be 
one of great interest, some men of 
national and international reputation 
of other states and some of North 
Carolina's strongest and best are to 
take part in the meeting, which is to 
be made a feast of oratory and infor- 
mation. 

It has been arranged to present to 
the first one hundred people who no- 
tify the Anti-Saloon League that they 
are coming to the convention a book 
containing forty of the best and most 
recent temperance addresses. Reduc- 
ed railroad rates have been secured 
of one and one-half full fare, plus fif- 
ty centts, and parties coming to the 
convention should secure from the 
ticket agents certificates showing that 
full fare has been paid, these certifi- 
cates, when signed by the secretary 
of the convention enabling the hold- 
ers to purchase return tickets at half 
tare, plus fifty cents. The member- 
ship of the State Convention consists 
of such delegates as are sent by bodies 
in sympathy with the league and by 
other persons attending who shall also 
sympathize with its objects. Churches, 



Sunday schools, Young Peoples' So- 
cieties, Y. M. C. A.,'s, W. C. T. U.'s, 
Baraca classes, Law and Order Lea- 
gues, and all like organizations are 
invited to send delegates. 

Among the- men not of the State 
who are to speak are Congressman 
Richmond Pearson Hobson, of Ala- 
bama; Rev. Geo. W. McDaniels, of 
Richmond, Va., and Rev. A. J. Bar- 
ton, of Waco Tex., member of the Leg- 
islative Committee of the Anti-Saloon 
League of America. The complete 
program shows that North Carolina 
will be ably represented by those who 
are to address the convention. This 
program follows: . 

Wednesday Afternoon, January 13 

3 to 3:15 — Devotional Services, Rev. 
J. G. Johnson, Selma. 

3:15 to 3:30— Address of Welcome 
and the Response. 

3:30 to 3 : 45 — Organize and Fix Com- 
mittees. 

3:45 to 4:15 — Address, Dr. James 
M. Parrott, Kinston. 

4:15 to 4:35— The Benefits of the 
Anti-Delivery Law in High Point, Mr. 
Fred N. Tate, Mayor, High Point. 

4:35 — General Discussion. 

Miscellaneous Business. 

Wednesday Evening 

7:30 to 7:45 — Devotional Services, 
Rev. B. P. Smith, Kinston. 

7:45 to 8:00— Financial Report, R. 
L. Davis. 

8:00 — Address, Rev. A. J. Barton, 
D. D., Waco, Texas. 

Thursday Morning, January 14 

9:30 to 9:45 — Devotional Services, 
Rev. J. A. Hornaday, Weldon. 

9:45 to 10:05— Address, The Sunday 
School in This Reform, Hon. John A. 
Oates, Fayetteville. 

-10:05 to 10:30— The Needful Legis- 
lation and How to Secure It, Hon. W. 
H. Witherspoon, Laurinburg. 

10:30 to 10:50 — General Discussion. 

10:50 to 11:10— The Report, of the 
Superintendent. 

11:10 to 11:30— Address, Dr. H. Q. 
Alexander, Mecklenburg County, Pres- 
ident North Carolina Farmers' Union. 

11:30 to 11:45— The Outlook for Na- 
tional Prohibition, Rev. A. J. Barton, 
D. D., Waco, Texas, Member of the 
Legislative Committee Anti-Saloon 
League of America. 

11:45 to 12 : 00— Enrollment and Col- 
lections. 

12:00 — Report of the Committee on 
Resolutions. 

Miscellaneous Business. 

Thursday Afternoon 

2:30 to 2:45 — Devotional Services, 
Rev. J. H. Weaver, D. D., Greensboro. 

2:45 to 3:00— Report of the Com- 
mittee on Nominations. 

3:00 to 3:30— Address, Dr. W. L. 
Poteat, Wake Forest. 

3:30 to 4:00— Address, Dr. F. N. 
Parker, Trinity College. 

4:00 to 4:15 — Report of the Assis- 
tant Superintendent. 

4:15 to 4:30 — Report of the Commit- 
tee on Finance and Audit. 

4 : 30 — Enrollment. 

Unofficial Business. 

Miscellaneous Business. 

Thursday Evening 

7:30 to 7:45 — Devotional Services. 

7 : 45 to 8 : 15 — Address, A Voice From 
Virginia, Rev. Geo. W. McDaniels, 
Richmond. 

8:15 — Address, Hon. Richmond 
Pearson Hobson, Alabama. 



"Every times you write "worry" in 
the book of your life, you crowd out 
some pleasanter word." — Home Mes- 
senger. 



THE HELPER 

A Helpful Sermon each week. In- 
ternational Lesson Notes. 75 cents 
a year — 40 weeks. Trial offer: 6 
numbers 10 cents. 

Stamps or Silver 
Address: Rev. R. S. Fischer, 
2129 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



January 7, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page BUvea 



Our Dead 

MANSFIELD— On the 9th day of No- 
vember, 1914, the home of Mr. A. J. 
Mansfield was made sad when the 
death angel entered and claimed for 
its victim the beloved wife. Her 
death was due to paralysis; she had 
a stroke in 1913, then about 19 months 
later the second stroke, from which 
she never recovered. She never com- 
plained about anything. Sister Mans- 
field's maiden name was Jennie Ham- 
mock and she was 46 years and six 
months old; having befen born May, 
1868, in Chatham county, and was 
married to A. J. Mansfield 27 years 
ago. She joined the church in her 
girlhood days; first the Christian 
church, then the Methodist Episcopal 
church; having been a member of the 
North Monroe Methodist church for 
years. She loved her church and Bible. 
The writer — her pastor — passed her 
home almost every day and found her 
with her Bible reading God's Word 
and remarked she found so much 
comfort in it. She leaves the husband 
and one sister, Miss Kate Hammock, 
to mourn her death. The husband 
and sister have our sympathy. May 
God bless the home and save this peo- 
ple! R. H. Kennington. 

Raleigh Advocate please copy. 



MRS. MARY WOMACK POWELL 

The subject of this obituary was 
the daughter of Gassaway and Martha 
Womack. She was born in Cleveland 
county, on May 5th, 1848. She died 
near Mill Springs, N. C, on December 
9th, 1914. She was the youngest of 
five children, two of whom, Rev. W. W. 
Womack and Mrs. Eliza Jackson, sur- 
vive her. 

On June 3rd, 1874, she was married 
to Mr. J. C. Powell, of Polk county, 
but formerly of Cleveland county. 
They journeyed together, for forty 
years. The husband and the three 
children, Rev. H. L. Powell, pastor of 
the Methodist church at Cliffside, N. 
C; Mrs. Alice Edwards and Mr. Q. M. 
Powell, both of Mill Springs, N. C, 
are left to make the rest of the jour- 
ney alone. 

At twelve years of age, at Clover 
Hill camp meeting, she was converted 
and joined the Methodist church un- 
der the pastorate of Rev. J. S. Nelson. 
To the end she lived a devoted Chris- 
tian life. As a church and Sunday 
school worker she was efficient and 
successful. She led, by personal work, 
her three children and her grand chil- 
dren to the foot of the cross. 

Her Bible was her daily companion. 
She was devoted to it because of its 
sweet comforting truths. 

From the first Mrs. Powell's home 
was the preacher's home. Because of 
their hearty welcome they were often 
found there. Her Christian life was 
a beautiful interpretation of God's 
word. 

She consecrated her eldest son to 
the ministry. When he started as a 
missionary to Cuba, she said it was 
the greatest trial of her life, but she 
would not for any thing hinder him 
in the Lord's work. 

Declining health deprived her of 
the labors in which she so much de- 
lighted. Yet her mind and heart were 
upon these things. From a stroke of 
paralysis that came on the afternoon 
of Thanksgiving day she never rallied 
enough to carry on a connected con- 
versation. Yet she had a smile for 
all who came to her bedside. 

The cuhrch has lost a loyal mem- 
ber, the community a motherly spirit, 
the husband a devoted wife, and the 
children a faithful mother. At Leba- 
non, on Dec. 10, 1914, at 11 o'clock, 
in the presence of a large congrega- 
tion of friends and neighbors, Rev. 
Albert Sherrill, of Rutherfordton, 
preached her funeral from Job 14, 7, 



after which they laid her body to rest 
in the cemetery near by. 

Albert Sherrill. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Emma Ramsey 

"Yet speaketh; there was no last word 
ot love 

So suddenly on us the sorrow fell, 
Her quick transition to the Home 
above 

Was clouded with no shadow of 
farewell." 

Whereas, Our Heavenly Father in 
His infinite wisdom has seen fit to 
call to a higher school our faithful 
Sunday school worker, Miss Emma 
Ramsey; be it resolved therefore: 

First, That we, the members of the 
Iotla Sunday school, bow in humble 
submission to His will who doeth all 
things well. 

Second, That in her death the Sun- 
day school has lost one of the best 
and most faithful members, and the 
family a devoted daughter and sister. 

Third, That we extend to the be- 
reaved family our deep and heartfelt 
sympathy and commend them to the 
care of the Heavenly Father, and bid 
them look through the clouds of sor- 
row to her eternal life. 

Fourth, That we, members of said 
school, are deeply saddened, and la- 
ment the untimely death of our dear 
friend, and feel that in her death we 
have sustained an irreparable loss. 

Fifth, That a copy of these resolu- 
tions be sent to the bereaved family, 
the Franklin Press and the Christian 
Advocate for publication, and written 
upon the minutes of the Sunday school 
Nettie Edwards, 
Olive Poindexter, 
J. E. Myers, 

Committee. 



ZIMMERMAN — Amanda Jane Zim- 
merman was born Feb. 23, 1855, and 
died Nov. 21, 1914, age 59 years, eight 
month and 28 days. She was the 
daughter of Joseph and Wiltoelmina 
Sink. She was married to Alexander 
Zimmerman on April 3, 1873. She 
joined the Lutheran Church at the 
aage of 15. After her marriage she 
joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, at Mt. Olivet, in Davidson coun- 
ty, Davidson circuit, and lived a con- 
sistent member of the same until the 
day of her death. This union was 
blessed with ten children, nine boys 
and one girl, of which two preceded 
her to the Spirit Land. She is sur 
vived by her husband, eight children, 
seven boys and one girl, four brothers 
and one sister, many relatives and 
friends to mourn her loss. She was 
a loving and dutiful companion, a de- 
voted mother, a consecrated Christian 
and was always ready to lend a help- 
ing hand to bless others. Sister Zim- 
merman was the mother of Dr. John 
W. Zimmerman, of Salisbury, also Dr. 
Robt. Zimmerman, of Eenterprise, N. 
C. She possessed a noble spirit, 
thoughtful always of her church and 
pastor along with her good husband. 
She, with her husband, always filled 
her pew at Mt. .Olivet church. Well 
do I remember the last time I ever 
saw her alive. It was at the parson- 
age at Arcadia and expressed her con- 
fidence and expectation of her pas- 
tor's return. About the time our Con- 
ference closed, she was taken sudden- 
ly ill with pneumonia and died in a 
few days. And Monday, the 22nd day 
of November, after holding the burial 
service in Mt. Olivet church in the 
midst of a large concourse of people 
by the writer, her pastor, assisted by 
Rev. Mr. Holton, her body was borne 
with tender hands to its last resting 
place to await the second coming ot 
our Lord. Sister Zimmerman will be 
missed in the community, church and 
home. God bless all who mourn her 
loss. 

"Gone but not forgotten." 

Di S. Richardson, Pastor, j 



Greensboro College 
| for Women 

c^u^d Greensboro, N. C. 




The A Grade Woman's College of the Two 
Methodist Conferences of North Carolina 



T 



HIS TIME HONORED INSTITUTION has steadily improved 
its educational advantages to meet the requirements of 
modern life. 



IJ This college is of the A grade of the fourteen unit basis, con- 
ferring the degree of A. B. in the literary department, and the 
degree of B. M. in the music department. 

f§ Special care has been taken to select as members of our faculty 
teachers of thorough training in our best colleges and universi- 
ties, and of successful experience. 

•I In addition to our regular classical course, and preparatory 
department open to students having completed the eighth grade, 
special attention is called to the departments of Home Economics, 
Expression, Business, Art, Education, Sunday School Teacher 
Training, Piano Pedagogy, and to our complete School of Music 
which hassteadily grown into one of the highest excellence in 
our country 

^ Our aim is to make our institution a place for genuine, first 
class work amid a religious and homelike atmosphere. Special 
effort is made to bring the student into personal touch with the 
teacher, an essential element in true education. 

THE SPRING TERM BEGINS JANUARY 1 3th, I9I5 
^ For further particulars regarding the college address 

Rev. S. B. Turrentine, A. M., D. D., Pres. 
Greensboro, North Carolina 



GREENSBORO NURSERIES 

AGENTS WANTED 

For Fruit, Shade and Ornamental Trees, Vines and Plants. 

JOHN A. YOUNG & SONS, Greensboro, JV. C. 



Agents Wanted 



•J We want good, live, hustling agents in 
all towns. :: :: :: :: :: 

<JIf you desire good work and prompt 
service, we are at your command. :: :: 

^ Write for our liberal terms. Represent 

The Charlotte Laundry 

OLDEST LARGEST BEST 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



TO THE PEOPLE OF THE SOUTH 

Europe is not now consuming any of our cotton. Exports have stopped. The revenue of ear 
government has been greatly reduced. We are up agaiast sustaining self. We must act as producers, 
manuiacturera and consumers. This applies especially to the South, as there ia a strong foreign de- 
mand for the food products of the West and East. 

Southern people should consume as much of what they produce as is prac- 
ticable. They should demand cotton goods. One of the best and at the same 
time most serviceable products of cotton is The Lankf ord Humane Horse Collar. 
The extra heavy duck covering is made of cotton; it is stuffed with cotton fibre. 
Thou3ands of these collcrs are scld every year, requiring thousands of pounds 
of cotton to manufacture. Thousands more should be sold, because the South- 
ern people should use no other. 

The Lankf ord Humane Horse Collar will be delivered to any address f or $1.00. 
It 13 durable, lasting three years or more. It is humane, because it cures galls 
and sore Bhoulders while the animal works. It is soft and pliable and will fit; 
any neck. If you need a collar for your horse or mule order the Lankf ord Humane Cotton Collar 
to-day. 




COUCH BROS. MFC. QQ„ 



8?« Ul ( . Ht"ph'ia?*f' f ' 



Page Twelve 



NOETH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 7, 1915 



The Sunday School Lesson 



FIRST QUARTER— LESSON II- 
JANUARY 10, 1915 



Deborah and Baeack Deliver Israel 
Judges 4:4-23; 1-22 



Golden Text — The righteous cried, 
and Jehovah heard, and delivered them 
out of all their troubles. Psa. 34:17. 
Summary of the Lesson 
That fascinating story Zenobia, or 
the Fall of Palmyra, tells of a beautiful 
and brilliant queen and her dream of 
world empire. Not so far-reaching a 
dream possessed the mind of Debo- 
rah, the powerful woman of Israel. One 
thought mastered her. This was the 
deliverance of her people from their 
oppressors. Inspired by this idea and 
by a profound confidence in Jehovah, 
she persuaded Barak to go forth to 
war. He was a strong man, but he de- 
pended upon a stronger woman. To- 
gether they went forth. The hosts of 
fighting men were summoned. The bat- 
tle was fought. The God of Israel used 
nature itself as a weapon to fight the 
foes of Israel. Barak and his warriors 
conquered. They inflicted a crushing 
defeat upon their foes. The woman's 
dream of victory had come true. She 
was not only a dreamer, but one who 
could transform her dreams into hard, 
strong facts. 

The Woman Who Declared Wae 
Charles Kingsley, in Hypatia, has 
given us a memorable picture of a wo- 
man of extraordinary intellectual 
power. The Book of Judges, in its 
potrait of Deborah, gives us a picture 
of a woman of commanding powers of 
personal leadership. For years her 
people had suffered under dreadful op- 
pression. At last the iron entered De- 
borah's soul. She had the spirit of a 
warrior, the mind of a leader and the 
inner eye of prophecy. Her people 
must not tamely submit to this galling 
tyranny. They must rise and fight and 
win. Against Sisera's chariots of iron 
they must bring iron hearts. Depend- 
ing upon Jehovah, their God, they 
must go forth with war cries on their 
lips and strength in their arms and 
an invincible courage in their souis. 
The proud, stern spirit in Deborah re- 
fused to believe that she belonged to 
a race of weaklings. There must be 
some deep secret of strength in the life 
of her peopie, which tould be roused 
and put in command of their activi- 
ties. They were not simply her own 
people — they were the people of Jeho- 
vah. That meant unspeakable resour- 
es within the reach of the people if 
they would but put forth their hands. 
You must measure them not by the 
kind of surroundings they had, but by 
the kind of a God they worshiped 
The important matter was not their 
weakness — it was His strength Such 
thoughts as these moved in the rririd 
of Deborah. They did more. They 
came forth from her lips. She was 
a sort of contagion of courage among 
her people. Her very presence, mag- 
netic, strong and assured, seemed the 
promise of a new day. When you 
looked into Deborah's flashing eyes 
Sisera's nine hundred chariots of iron 
did not seem so terrible, after a?l. So 
the leaven of a new spirit began to 
work among the men and women of 
Israel. It was a gradual process, but 
it was an effective one. The day would 
come when the people would be ready 
to be led forth, and then Deborah 
would look for a leader. In the mean- 
time she shared the life of her people, 
imbuing them with her own spirit and 
preparing them for the day which was 
to come. 

The Man Who Was Led by a Woman 
The first notable thing about Barak 
was that he did not have an artificial 
fiense of values. He recognized great- 
r^s when he stood in its presence and 
he did not refuse to believe in it be- 



cause it spoke in the voice of a wo- 
man. He was not like the blind and 
stubborn father in The Mill on the 
Floss, who had a theory that a wo- 
man could not be possessed of a strong 
mind and a potent personality, and 
therefore simply could not understand 
or appreciate his daughter. Barak 
had that rare kind of mental dis- 
crimination which recognizes its own 
strength, its limitations and, most re- 
markable of all, at once appreciates 
and accepts the guidance of one whose 
qualities are superior to its own. Bar- 
ak knew that he was a good fighting 
man. He knew that the people would 
rally around him with confidence. He 
knew that he could lead them forth to 
battle, but he also knew that there 
was a compelling kind of leadership 
whose secret he did not possess. There 
was a kind of mastery of the thoughts 
and purposes of men coming from a 
mind athrill with a great vision and 
words vibrant with power to interpret 
it, which he did not command. He 
could be the military leader of an en- 
terprise, but he could not be its poet 
or its prophet. 

So when Deborah urged him to col- 
lect the men of Israel and lead them 
forth against their foes, he replied 
quite simply that if she would accom- 
pany the expedition he would go. With- 
out her presence and the inspiration 
which it would give he would have 
nothing to do with the enterprise. It 
is quite evident that he was thinking 
more of the success of the undertak 
ing than of his own place in it. Mo- 
tives of race loyalty and religious devo 
tion rather than motives of personal 
aggrandizement were in command. 

Abraham Lincoln said once: "The 
great thing is not that I should save 
the country. It is that the country 
should be saved." In the spirit of de- 
votion to his cause rather than of de- 
votion to himself Barak was ready to 
go forth to war. Deborah recognized 
his spirit and the narrative tells us 
how, with grim humor, she told him 
that the hand of a woman, and not his 
own, was to slay Sisera at last. If 
Barak feared that too much honor 
might be thrust upon him she could 
*-eassure him. There was no cause for 
alarm in this direction. So the strong 
man, who recognized and was not 
ashamed to follow a stronger woman, 
prepared for the fight. 

The Greater Leadership 
The real leader of the expedition, 
however, was neither Deborah nor 
Barak. The first word of the power- 
ful woman to the fighting man had 
been: "Hath not Jehovah, the God of 
Tsrael, commanded?" — and just before 
the battle her word of encouragement 
was this: "Up, for this is the day in 
which Jehovah hath delivered Sisera 
into thy hand. Is not Jehovah gone 
out before thee?" It was God Him 
self who was back of the enterprise 
It was a sense of His leadership 
which made Barak and his warriors 
strong. 

A man never comes to have the most 
powerful incentive which life can give 
until he comes to a place where he 
feels that his cause is the cause of God. 
The sense of divine compulsion is the 
greatest thing back of human achieve- 
ment. 

A Christian minister was once ad- 
dressing a company of young people in 
a Jewish synagogue. He emphasized 
the new dynamic which comes into all 
social service, indeed into all the work 
we do, when we feel that God is back 
of it and in it, that His energy drives 
us on and His strength is a practical 
and constant resource. At the close of 
the addres a young Jew hastened to 
him to say that he did his work with 
just that sense of God back of it and 
God in it. The two stood side by side 
—the Christian and the Jew. Dif- 



ferences were forgotten for the mo- 
ment and the deep, common experi- 
ence of dependence upon God made 
them one. 

There are still many great bs.ttles 
to fight. Men must go forth to war 
against evil and for the enthrone- 
ment of the good. Sturdy, vigorous 
fighting men like Barak are needed. 
Advisers as magnetic and full of in- 
spiration as Deborah are needed, too, 
but the great essential is the experi- 
ence which both Deborah and Barak 
possessed — the consciousness of the 
leadership of God. 

One of the worst things about the 
gnostic speculations, with their strange 
series of little deities, was that they 
pushed God away. He was the infin- 
itely Far. He could not easily toucn 
His world. The descent from God to 
man was a long and perilous way. A 
view of life which gives us a God 
out of reach gives us also an impov- 
erished world. The God in whom Ba- 
rak believed went forth before him in- 
to battle. Our God, too, is a soldier 
deity, marching at the head of His 
armies against all the forces of wrong. 

The Defeat of Sisera 
Schiller once wrote a brief poem 
which throbs with the very clash of 
battle. There is no description of the 
details of the fight between the men 
of Sisera and the men of Barak. The 
fierce onslaught, the bewildering way 
in which nature itself fought for the 
men of Israel, the dreadful carnage, 
the complete annihilation of the army 
of Sisera and the tragic death of the 
leader himself, tell the tale of the day's 
work, and imagination can picture the 
story of these thousands of men con- 
tending each with his own hope and 
his own fear, until the hour when some 
hearts were cold and still and others 
were flushed with victory. 

Through all this primitive ferocity 
God was moving for the accomplish- 
ment of His own great purposes and 
the leading of men to a higher destiny. 
A world in turmoil is not a world for- 
saken by God, but a world where God 
is moving in order to bring about 
great results. Out of travail and pain, 
out of confusion and battle, out of 
strange discord and wild alarm strides 
the Master of Life, strong in His pow- 
er to rule the tempest of men's hate 
ind work His own high will upon the 
world. 

The ancient discipline of a chosen 
people may have its significance in re- 
spect of the modern discipline of a 
"hosen world. There are times when 
through the smoke of battle we cannot 
discern the figure of the great Leader; 
there are times when we are all con- 
fused as to what is His relation to 
the fight, but of one thing we may be 
sure, the Lord of hosts is on the 
world's battlefields and in the end His 
own purposes will be furthered by the 
i«sue of the conflict. The defeat of 
Sisera >vas the victory of Jehovah. In 
the weld's greatest battles whoever 
else is defeated God will be victorious. 
—Lynn H. Hough, D. D., in N. Y. 
Christian Advocate. 



JttlAMiOAhl 



19 IS '-on;; 
Book, contains 
157 pages of 
_815 music, a 

large number ol 
old church tunes 
—192 pages In 
all— mus', n bind- 
ing 30c each, $3.00 per dozen, postpaid. Send 12c and 
12 names of S!nH"K Teachers, Choir Lead* rs. Sunday 
ilrhon] f;u7Pr*n J eMents and Singers, and get one sam- 
ple copy, postpaid. Address 

The Teachers' P.luaic Putlishinfi Co., Hudson, N. C. 



PELOUBET'S 
SELECT NOTES 

The World's Greatest Commentary on the 
International Sunday School Lessons for 1915 

By REV. F. N. PELOUBET, D.D., »nd 
PROF. AMOS R. WELLS, Lilt.D., LL.D. 

4!«.i ANNUAL VOLUME 
Next to the Bible, the teacher's best friend 
Cloth, price, $1.00 net: $1.15, postpaid 

W. A. WILDE COMPANY 

Boaton »nd Chicago 



BEAUTIFUL 
FLORAL 
DESIGNS 

Furnished on short notice 




Summit Avenue Greenhouses 



HOWARD GARDNER 



Proprietor 



GREENSBORO, 



N. C. 



Office Phone 511 Res. Phone 1345 



DR. C. W. MOSBLEY \ 

DISEASES OF 
STOMACH AND INTESTINES 



121% So. Elm St., Greensboro, N. C. 



The Newest Styles of Jewelry 

WATCHES, STERLINQ SILVER 
AND PLATE WARE 
Clocks that will run and a large assort- 
ment of Pine Pqcket Book*, Cut Glass- 
ware and Ornaments. We are the ©lde»t 
leading firm In the city. Everything guar- 
anteed. 

SCHIFFMAN JEWELRY CO. 

LEADING JEWELERS 




to 



1 



PAINT 
STRENGTH 

Strength is what 
paint is for. The 
stronger it is, the 
less gallons and 
money it takes, 
and the longer it 
wears. The strong- 
, est paint-word is 
DEVOE. 

ODELL 

Hardware Co. 



•S3 

If 

K>V! 
;»■;'' 

i |.V, 



January 7, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Thirteen 



Our Little Folks' Department | 



A NEW YEAR SONG 

When the year is new, my dear, 

When the year is new, 
Let us make a promise here, 

Little I and you. 
Not to fall a-quarreling 
Over every tiny thing, 
But sing and smile, smile and sing, 

All the glad year through. 

As the year goes by, my dear, 

As the year goes by, 
Let us keep our sky swept clear, 

Little you and I. 
Sweep up every cloudy scowl, 
Every little thunder-growl, 
And live and laugh, laugh and live, 

'Neath a cloudless sky. 

When the year is old, my dear, 
When the year is old, 

Let us never doubt or fear, 
Though the days grow cold. 

Loving thoughts are always warm; 

Merry hearts know ne'er a storm. 

Come ice and snow, so love's dear glow 
Turn all our gray to gold. 

—From Five-Minute Stories — Copy- 
right by Dana Estes & Co., Boston. 



TURNING THE NEW YEAR 
LEAVES 

"Now what is that noise?" said the 

glad New Year. 
"Now what that singular sound I hear? 
As if all the paper in all the world 
Were rattled and shaken and twisted 

and twirled." 

"Oh, that," said the jolly old Earth, "is 
the noise 

Of all my children, both girls and boys 
A-turning over their leaves so new, 
And all to do honor, New Year, to 
you." 

What the New Leaves Said 

I won't squeak my pencil on my slate; 
I won't lie in bed every day and be 
late; 

I won't make faces at Timothy Slack; 
I won't make fun at any one's back, 

Rustle and turn them, so and so! 

The good shall come, and the bad 
shall go. 

I won't be greedy at the dinner table! 
At least — I think I wont — if I'm able; 
I will not pinch, nor poke, nor tease; 
I will not sputter, nor cough, nor 
sneeze. 

I will not grumble, nor fret, nor scold. 
And I'll do exactly whatever I'm told. 

Rustle and turn them, so and so! 

The good shall come, and the bad 
shall go. 

— Laura E. Richards. 



A PRIZE WINNER 

Johnny came home from school 
the other night in high glee, wear- 
ing the arithmetic medal. "What is 
that for?" asked his mother. "That's 
the prize for doing arithmetic," said 
Johnny. "I did this one: 'If our new 
baby weighs eleven and a half pounds, 
and gains an ounce each day, 'cause 
you told Mrs. Smith she did yester- 
day, how much will she weigh when 
she is twenty years old.' And the 
answer was, four hundred and sixty- 
six pounds. The teacher said I earn- 
ed the prize." — Selected. 



THE LITTLE TAPER DID IT 

One night a man took a little taper 
out of a drawer and lighted it and be- 
gan to ascend a long, winding stair. 

"Where are you going?" said the 
taper. 

"Away high up," said the man; 
"higher than the top of the house 
where we sleep." 

"And what are you going to do 
there?" said the taper. 

"I am going to show the ships out 
at sea where the harbor is," said the 



man. "For we stand here at the en- 
trance of the harbor, and some ship 
far out on the stormy sea may be 
looking for our light even now." 

"Alas! no ship could ever see my 
light," said the taper; "it's so very 
small." 

"If your light is small," said the 
man, "keep it burning bright and 
leave the rest to me." 

When the man got up to the top of 
the lighthouse he took the little taper 
and with it lighted the great lamps 
that stood ready there with their pol- 
ished reflectors behind them. 

"O," said the taper, "if I had not 
kept my light burning, the big lamps 
would not have been lit when you 
came up here." 

The light keeper smiled, and all he 
said was: "Little tapers never know 
when they are going to be needed. 
That is' why they must keep their 
light bright and be ready to help 
when called upon." — Selected. 



TINY DOLLS 

In a little Mexican town lives an 
Indian girl who makes the smallest 
dolls in the world. First, she makes 
a wire frame hardly three-fourths of 
an inch in length; this is wound with 
silk thread. When the proper form 
is attained the doll is dressed, some- 
times as a flower girl, a boy or a 
priest, cardinal or pope. Not only 
does the little doll mother dress her 
children, but she daintily embroiders 
their clothes. Those who have seen 
her handiwork, say the stitches are 
perfect when examined under a mag- 
nifying glass. — Selected. 



THE WHISTLER 

It was a corner where the cars stop- 
ped. A dozen men and women were 
waiting. Suddenly there rose on the 
evening air a burst of bird song. Rich- 
ard Marshall forgot the car he was 
waiting for. He was back in Eng- 
land, listening to the triumphant glad- 
ness of the skylark's song, as the bird 
hung, a mere speck in the sky, and 
poured out its heart's joy. There 
came a moment of silence, and then 
the notes of "Auld Lang Syne" rang 
softly on the air. Marshall turned to 
a man who stood beside him. 

"It's a human bird," the other man 
said. "Fine imitation, isn't it?" 

A car came up and stopped with a 
grinding of brakes. The young man 
did not board it. He was listening to 
the song of a mocking bird; he could 
almost see the swelling of the South- 
ern songster's throat. 

The music evidently came from a 
basement workshop; "Paul Haskin, 
Tailor. Men's clothing renovated and 
pressed," the sign said. Richard de- 
scended the steps. 

"Can I do anything for you, sir?" 

The speaker was perhaps thirty-five 
years old. He was busy pressing a 
coat. 

"You can tell me where the inspira- 
tion comes from," Richard said. 

A peculiar smile came to the work- 
er's lips. "From an aching leg," he 
said. 

Richard's eyes, meeting his, saw 
lines of pain under them. "But the 
music was full of gladness," he said. 

"Why not? There's gladness in the 
world in spite of pain. I'm not sure 
that those who know about pain don't 
know some things about gladness that 
the crowd misses. Anyhow, better 
whistle than groan. There are times 
when it has to be one or the others." 

Richard noticed that as he moved 
across the room, he drew one leg after 
him stiffly. 

"I fell from the rigging of a schoon- 
er, and I can't get about much," the 
tailor said. "The leg never gives 
me much ease." 



"And men in the street above hear 
bird songs and catch a reflection of 
the joy that is in the world," Richard 
returned. 

Paul Haskin's smile broadened. 
"Pain usually makes a man break si- 
lence," he said. "I've gone round the 
world a bit, and know many a bird's 
song. Whistling's as good an easer 
of pain as grumbling, and people like 
better to listen to it. It's grown into 
a habit, and I whistle now when the 
leg forgets to ache as well as when it's 
bad. Habit's a great thing, but a man 
must look out that it's not a habit of 
growling!" — The Youth's Companion. 



A FORWARD LOOK 

The year is before us. One of the 
customary admonitions at the border- 
line is, "This year we may die." It is 
far more pertinent to say, "This year 
we must live." For living is more sol- 
emn than dying. It means responsi- 
bility, day by day, hour by hour. Pa- 
tience is heroism, faithfulness is suc- 
cess, steadfastness is ultimate tri- 
umph. These are the virtues that 
shine brightest in the divine inven- 
tory. On Riverside Drive, in New 
York, just under the shadow of the 
Grant monument is a solitary grave- 
stone inscribed, "To an Amiable 
Child." It was over a century ago that 
this child lived sweetly, unselfishly, 
amiably for a while and then return- 
ed to God. But who shall estimate the 
value of that brief life? For it is not 
success, but faithfulness that tells, af- 
ter all. 

And now, a happy new year to all! 
A year of God's peace in the con- 
sciousness of duty done; a year of 
simple faith in the divine goodness 
and of clear outlook toward the heav- 
enly hills; a year of sweet communion 
with Jesus and close following in his 
steps; a year like that pleasant walk 
in Emmaus of which the disciples said, 
"Did not our hearts burn within us 
while he talked with us by the way?" 
— David J. Burrell, D. D. 



THE NEW LEAVES 

"Wake up!" said a clear little voice. 
Tommy woke, and sat up in bed. At 
the foot of the bed stood a boy about 
his own age, all dressed in white, like 
fresh snow. He had very bright eyes, 
and he looked straight at Tommy. 

"Who are you?" asked Tommy. 

"I am the New Year!" said the boy. 
"This is my day, and I have brought 
you your leaves." 

"What leaves?" asked Tommy. 

"The new ones, to be sure," said the 
New Year. "I hear bad accounts of 
you from my Daddy — " 

"Who is you Daddy?" asked Tommy. 

"The Old Year, of course!" said the 
boy. "He said you asked too many 
questions, and I see he was right. He 
says you are greedy, too, and that you 
sometimes pinch your little sister, and 
that one day you threw your Reader 
into the fire. Now, all this must stop.' 

"O must it?" said Tommy. He felt 
frightened, and did not know just 
what to say. 

The boy nodded. "If it does not 
stop," he said, "you will grow worse 
and worse every year, till you grow 
up into a Horrid Man. Do you want 
to be a Horrid Man?" 

"N-no!" said Tommy. 

"Then you must stop being a horrid 
boy!" said the New Year. "Take your 
leaves!" and he held out a packet of 
what looked like copybook leaves, all 
sparkling white, like his own clothes. 

"Turn over one of these leaves every 
day," he said, "and soon you will be a 
good boy instead of a horrid one." 

Tommy took the leaves and looked 
at them. On each leaf a few words 
were written. On one it said, "Help 
your mother!" On another, "Don't pull 
the cat's tail!" On another, "Don't 
eat so much!" And on still another, 
"Don't fight Billy Jenkins!" 

"O!" cried Tommy. "I have to fight 
Billy Jenkins! He said — " 

"Good-by!" said the New Year. "I 



shall come again when I am old to 
see whether you have been a good 
boy or a horrid one. Remember, 

"Horrid boy makes horrid man; 
You alone can change the plan." 

He turned away and opened the 
window. A cold wind blew in and 
swept the leaves out of Tommy's hand. 
"Stop! stop!" he cried. "Tell me—" 
But the New Year was gone, and Tom- 
my, staring after him, saw only his 
mother coming into the room. "Dear 
child," she said. "Why, the wind is 
blowing everything about." 

"My leaves! My leaves!" cried 
Tommy; and jumping out of bed he 
looked all over the room, but he could 
not find one. 

"Never mind," said Tommy. "I can 
turn them just the same, and I mean 
to. I will not grow into a Horrid 
Man." And he didn't.— Ladies Home 
Journal. 



JAPANESE BIRTHDAY POLES 

In Japan the early part of the 
month of May is a gala time for all 
little Japanese boys, because it is at 
that time that the birthday of every 
one of them is celebrated. This big, 
general birthday party is familiarly 
known as the "fish festival." 

During the fish festival every family 
in which there is a boy proudly her- 
alds the fact by a flag that floats from 
a pole in the dooryard. It is desir- 
able to have as tall and as big a pole 
as possible; so, in order to get this 
kind of a pole it frequently happens 
that several families will club togeth- 
er and make one birthday pole do for 
all. This pole is then adorned with 
as many flags as there are little boys 
in the several families. 

On the top of every birthday pole 
there is always either a glittering 
ball or basket filled with something 
bright. There is also attached to the 
poles a string of carp fashioned either 
out of cloth or oiled paper and gaudily 
painted. These carp vary in length 
from three ito about twelve feet. The 
glittering ball at the top of the pole 
and the string of carp are intended to 
convey a lesson to the Japanese youths. 
If you know anything about the carp, 
you know that it is a strong fish that 
can swim against the most rapid cur- 
rents. Then, too, it is always so eager, 
so thoroughly determined to go up- 
stream that it struggles past every ob- 
stacle on its way up the river. The 
glittering ball at the top of the birth- 
day pole typifies a valuable prize that 
the carp is always striving to reach in 
spite of difficulties. 

Thus the little boys are taught that 
they must be determined and struggle 
to overcome obstacles, if they would 
sail up life's river and attain that 
which is worth having. 

The birthday poles are not all of 
the birthday celebration by any 
means. During the fish festival the lit- 
tle boys have jolly good times, receive 
gifts of various kinds, and have lots of 
good things to eat. You may be sure 
they are somewhat sorry when the 
birthday poles come down and the fish 
festival is over for a whole year. 

In February each year there is a 
birthday celebration in honor of all 
little Japanese girls. To call this cel- 
ebration a "doll festival" would not 
be a misnomer, for it is then that ev- 
ery little girl receives dolls from all 
of her relatives and friends. It is 
then, too, that the mother allows her 
little girls to feast their eyes upon 
dolls that have been in tha family for 
many generations. There are no 
birthday poles put up for the little 
girls; but they get many gifts and 
"oodles" of things to eat. When the 
birthday celebration comes to a close 
all of the best dolls a little girl gets 
are put away carefully, and she may 
not so much as take a peep at them 
again until February comes once more, 
and there is another birthday celebra- 
tion. Just think of a little girl having 
to wait a whole year to get to look at 
her best dolls! — Exchange. 



Page Fourteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 7, 1911 



| Our Children's Home!! 

X Conducted by Walter Thempeen, Suet. ', 

♦ < 

v ^ H ^j^^}..t..{..t..i.» 4 . 4 ..|.. t , »»» . { .. i .. H ' 



M ME. LOUISE HO 




We had a good Christmas. The re- 
port shows the kindness of our 
friends. There was a good deal which 
could not be identified. "We are grate- 
ful to everybody. 



Mention is due everybody. But evi- 
dently Mooresville and Lexington in- 
tended the children should know that 
the Christmas season was here. 



I had many little items in my mind 
to write, hut just as I was getting 
ready to write them out, one of our 
old girls who was at the Twin City 
Hospital here training for a nurse 
died suddenly of pneumonia early in 
the morning of January 2nd. Her 
death was such a shock to us here 
and to her associates at the hospital 
that I do not have the heart to write 
more. I append herewith the account 
of her death given in the Journal of 
January 3rd: 

Miss Emma Webb 

Miss Emma Webb of Asheville, age 
18 years, died yesterday morning at 
3:25 o'clock at the Twin City Hospi- 
tal after an illness of only a few 
hours of pneumonia. Miss Webb was 
in training as a nurse and had been 
at the hospital for only a month, when 
she was taken sick. Previous to that 
time she had been an inmate of the 
Children's Home, where she was a 
general favorite. She was possessed 
of a sweet, generous disposition, was 
thoroughly unselfish and had endeared 
herself to countless friends, all of 
whom will be greatly grieved to learn 
of her death. 

In her hospital work Miss Webb had 
made an unusual record and there was 
no doubt but that she would have been 
accepted at the expiration of her term 
of probation. She was greatly inter- 
ested in her work, was exceedingly 
ambitious and was much admired by 
all with whom she came in contact at 
the hospital. Her almost sudden 
death came unexpectedly and will be 
a great shock to her many friends. 
Up until 9 o'clock Friday morning 
she was on duty and her condition 
was not considered serious until Fri- 
day night. 

Instructions were received yester- 
day evening to send the remains to 
Asheville and they will leave for that 
city on the early train this morning. 



REPORT TO JAN. 1, 1915 

Fifth Sunday Collections 

Main St. M. E. S. S., High Point, 
Ghas. Osborne, ?6.27; Bethel S. S., 
Franklin Ct., Cullasaja, A. W. Ja- 
cobs, $2.60; Lilesvilee S. S., Lilesville, 
J. E. Kerr, $2.00; Bakersville S. S., 
Bakersville, J. A. Bradshaw, 68c; Mor- 
ganton S. S., Morganton, E. B. Clay- 
well, $12.97; Shady Grove S. S., Win- 
ston-Salem, R. H. Stone, $1.50; Wil- 
liamson Chapel, Mooresville Ct., Da- 
vidson, J. L. Donaldson, 34c; Bethel 
S. S., Winston-Salem, Lexsa Kimel, 
$2.27; Booneville S. S., Booneville, 
L. F. Amburn, $2.84; Mt. Gilead S. 
S., Trinity, Marcus Briles, 90c; Gil- 
key S. S., Gilkey, C. F. Cline, $4.35; 
Salem S. S., Cullasaja, T. R. Gray, 
$2.00; Norwood S. S., Norwood, T. 
A. Hathcock, $7.90. Total, $46.62. 



Received on Special, General and Ten 
Per Cent. Collections 

Oak Forest church, Morganton, A. 
C. Swafford, $2.18; Mt. Pleasant 
church, Morganton, A. S. Swafford, 
$1.58; Sigma Theta class, Tryon St. 
S. S., Charlotte, Vivian Siniard, $6.- 
25; R. H. Latham, Winston, $1.50; 
Mrs. Hattie Kale, Albemarle, $10.00; 
Central church, Concord, M. F. Moos- 
et), $10.00; West End S. S., Winston, 
B. S. Womble, $44.61; West Mark- 
et S. S., Greensboro, W. H. Rees, 
$10.00; Spring Garden St. church, 




AND THE 



Weaver 
Piano 

MME. HOMER is one 
of America's greatest 
singers. Great singers are ex- 
tremely particular as to what 
pianos shall accompany their 

marvelous voices. Only a very few pianos are sufficiently 
pure in tone and responsive in the action to satisfy them. 
Mme. Homer says the tone and action in the Weaver Pianc 
suit her exactly. This is the opinion of the greatest living 
musicians, and the Weaver Piano is the greatest piano of the present day, and marks the 
highest development of present day piano quality. 

Write low catalogue. Old instruments taken in exchange. Time payments. 

Weaver Organ & Piano Co. ySE^KSSX 




Greensboro, W. B. Hunt, $17.58; Beth- 
el church, New London charge, New 
London, R. L. Melton, $2.50; Mt. Zion 
church, Cornelius, A. F. Torrence, $4.- 
45; Frank Gurley, High Point, $10.- 
00; Washington St., S. S., High Pt., 
V. A. J. Idol, $26.53; a friend, $2.- 
00; Spring Garden St church, Greens- 
boro, W. O. Goode, $25.00. Total, 
$174.28. 



Building Fund 

T. W. Young, Candler, $1.00; Mrs. 
E. T. Morgan, Candler, $2.00; Ed. 
Powell, Candler, $1.00; L. W. Young, 
Candler, $1.00; W. L. Davis, Candler, 
$1.00; J. V. Morgan, Candler, $1.00; 
Mrs. L. W. Young, Candler, $1.00; 
Mrs. R. C. Pusley, Candler, $1.00; Mrs. 
Ed. Powell, Candler, 50c; R. B. Tay- 
lor, Candler, $1.00; H. A. Dunham, 
Asheville, $50.00; Mrs. Bettie Line- 
berger, Shelby, $100.00; J. W. Long, 
Catawba, $25.00; J. E. Sales, Fletch- 
er, 5.00. Total, $190.50. 



Donations in Kind 

Missionary Society, Jamestown, 
Miss Virginia Ragsdale, one coop 
chickens; Miss Lina West, Ramseur, 
1 quilt; S. S. class of Mrs. Alice A. 
Heath, Monroe, 1 box canned fruit; 
E. N. Howard, Mechanic, 16 pairs of 
hose; S. S. class of Mrs. L. C. BIck- 
ett, Newton, 1 dozen handkerchiefs, 
hose, ribbon and mittens; S. S. class 
of Mrs. C. M. Burris, Jr., Wadesboro; 
5 dozen handkerchiefs, Philathea class, 
Lilesville, 1 pair blankets; Junior 
Workers of Muir's Chapel, Miss Delia 
M. Sheeler, Guilford College, 1 box 
clothing; Elkin Light Bearers, Mrs. A. 
M. Smith, Elkin, 30 pairs gloves, 2 
dresses, 3 handkerchiefs and 1 pair 
hose; Primary class of Washington 
St. church, High Point, 52 handker- 
chiefs, 1 piece ribbon; Mrs. H. D. Poin- 
dexter, Winston, 3 coats; Mrs. W. J. 
Price, Beaver Creek, child's outfit of 
clothing; Mr. A. J. Shaver, Macon, 
Florida, 2 boxes oranges; Ladies' Aid 
Society Patty's Chapel, Mrs. J. C. 
Sales, Fletcher, 1 barrel apples; 1 box 
canned fruit; Mrs. W. B. Shinn, Bes- 
semer City, 1 box canned fruit; Mor- 
ganton Epworth League, Morganton, 
1 box oranges; R. L. Scroggs, Mo- 
ravian Falls, 24 cans tomatoes; Little 
Children's Sewing Club, Jamestown, 1 
quilt; Light Bearers Society, James- 
town, 1 quilt; High Shoals Philathea 
class, 32 pairs hose; S. Main St. S. 
S., class of girls, Salisbury, 12 outing 
night gowns; Light Bearers, Weaver- 
ville, 15 handkerchiefs; Light Bearers 
Central church, Concord, Mrs. J. E. 
Smoot, 1 box clothing, remnants of 
cloth and 39 pairs hose; Sentinel of- 
fice, Winston, magazines; W. C. iT, 



U., Winston, magazines; W. R. Alex- 
ander, Swannanoa, 1 crate apples; 
Biltmore, 1 coop chickens, canned 
fruit, etc., through Mrs. D. T. Rob- 
erts; Franklinville, 1 coop of chick- 
ens; Lexington, fruit, confections, 
toys and articles of clothing; Ad- 
vance, 2 boxes canned fruit, 1 pair 
shoes and 5 pairs hose; Henrietta, 2 
barrels canned fruit; Josef Lindsey, 
Reidsville, 1 bolt outing; Methodist 
church, Monroe, through Mr. J. W. 
Murdock, 1 coop chickens, 1 box or- 
anges, 1 box oranges and apples, 1 
box canned fruit and small pack- 
ages; 1 coop chickens, no name; Hon. 
C. B. Watson, 1 turkey. 



A GENEROUS RAILROAD COMPANY 

The Carolina and North Western 
Railroad deserve great commendation 
for their thoughtful courtesy in issu- 
ing the ministers of the Gospel resid- 
ing on their line of road an annual 
pass. 

Many warm expressions of appreci- 
ation are heard by ministers on all 
hands along the line. 

The management are Christian gen- 
tlemen. May the blessing of God rest 
upon them and their business in- 
terests! 



LOAN FUNDS AND WAR TIMES 

At the close of business on this, 
the thirty-first day of December, 1914, 
our books show contributions to the 
Loan Fund Capital of the Board of 
Church Extension amounting to $84,- 
843,07. This increase has been made 
since the close of the last fiscal year, 
March 31, 1914, and therefore covers 
nine months. 

The largest annual increase during 
the history of the Board was shown 
at the close of the fiscal year in 1913, 
and was $66,222.66. We must reach 
the $100,000.00 mark during the pres- 
ent fiscal year. 

It may be of interest to know that 
the increase of 84,843.07 shown above 
for the three-fourths of the present fis- 
cal year represents 280 contributions, 
the largest of which was $10,000.00; 
the smallest of which was 65 cents — 
an average contribution of $303.01. 

W. F. McMurry, 
Corresponding Secretary. 

Louisville, Ky. 



"A RESCUE HOME" 

North Carolina needs and must have 
a rescue home for fallen women. Let 
all the papers of the state lay this 
matter before their readers and urge 
our next Legislature to start such a 
home. A. D. Betts. 

Greensboro, N. C. 



HELP WANTED LADIES 

Ladies of character may earn nice in 
come at home every month taking order 
from friends for REIF'S high class Toile 
Articles, Fairy Creme, Perfume, Food Fla 
voring Extracts and full line. Libera 
commission paid. This is for married o 
single women, young or old. Reference 
required. Get our free Instruction book 
We teach you how to succeed from th 
start. Honorable, dignified work. Writ 
now and get territory and beautiful sam 
pie case. 

United Stores Drug Co., 813 Cherry Streel 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 



Cabbage Plants 

FORTY MILLIONS 
OF GENUINE FROST PROOF PLANTS 

Grown in the open field on our farms at 
Albany, Ga., and Greenville, S.C, from strict- 
ly hieh grade seed, and will make heads If 
given half a chance. We change our land each 
year, thus avoiding lice and disease. We ship 
promptly, guarantee full count, safe delivery, 
and good strong plants. 

Varieties: Early Jersey Wakefield, Charles- 
ton Wakefield, Succession, Early Drumhead 
and Flat Dutch. 

Price: 500 for $1.00 post paid. By express, not 
prepaid, 500 for 75c; 1000 to 4000 at $1.25 per 1000: 
5000to9000at$1.00perl000;10,000 to 15,000 at 90C 
per 1000. Special prices on large lots. 

Beets and Bermuda onion plants at $1.25 per 
1000; Lettuce plants, Big Boston at $1.50 per 1000; 
Strawberry plants, leading varieties at $2.50 
per 1000; also a choice line of fruit trees. 
PIEDMONT PLANT CO. 
Albany, Ga., and Greenville, S. C. 

Nancy Hall and 
Porto Rico potato 
plants ready April 
1st. Write for our 
illustrated catalogue 
which gives a full 
description of our 
plants and fruit 
trees. 



WANTED, Ford Owners S&ew^v'Sbi 

Simplex Self Starter." Ford cars only. N 
batteries, springs, cables or other junl 
Equal to any electric starter at one-fift 
the price. Fully guaranteed. Shipped ou 
on a week's trial. Sells on sight. Writ 
quick. 

Simplex Manufacturing Co., 1551 Grea 
Northern Building, Chicago 




THIS 8PACE BELONGS TO 

ROBT. W.MURRAY 

GENERAL 

INSURANCE 

Greensboro, North Carolina 

308>4 South E)ai St. 
Phono 163 



THE SANITARY" OX CUP? 

Xtistof thousands of churches uning 
oar cups and FREE CATALOG with 
Quotations aent upon request. ^ ^ iff nmt wxy 
Sanitary Communion Outfit Co. . '7 1st St., Rochester, N, 1 



WE PAY $80 A MONTH SALARY 

and furnish rig and all axpanaaa to Introducs out 

Suarantaad poultry and •tack powdars. Addrsai 
IGLEH COMPANY. X708, SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



January 7, 1915 



NOETH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Fifteen 



1' Quarterly Meetings J 

ASHEVILLE DISTRICT— C. A. Wood, 
Presiding Elder, Weavervllle, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Mills River, Shaw's Creek 9-10 

Central, night 10 

Flat Rock, Flat Rock 16-17 

Tryon and Saluda, Tryon 17-18 

Falrview, Tweeds 23-24 

North Asheville, night 24 

Walnut, Jewel Hill 30-31 

Hot Sp'gs and Marshall, Marshall, night 31 

February 

Sulphur Springs, Laurel Hill 6-7 

West Asheville, night 7 

Swannanoa, Swannanoa 13-14 

Black Mountain, night 14 

Weavervllle Ct., Flint Hill 20-21 

Bethel, night 21 

There will be a meeting of the preach- 
ers of the district at Haywood Street 
church, Thursday, Dec. 10th, at 2 p. m., 
and at night. All preachers urged to be 
present. 

District stewards meeting at Central 
church, Friday, Dec. 11th, at 10 a. m. 



CHARLOTTE DISTRICT— J. C. Rowe, 
Presiding Elder, Charlotte, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Thrift, Thrift 2-3 

Dilworth, Dilworth, night 3 

Marshville, Center 9 

Monroe, Central 10 

Monroe, North Monroe, night 10 

Prospect, Carmel 18-17 

Unionville, Grace, p. m 17-18 

Morven, Bethel 24-25 

Wadesboro, Wadesboro, night 25 

Polkton, Peachland 30 

Lilesville, Lilesville 31 

February 

Ansonvllle, Ansonville 6-7 

Waxhaw, Waxhaw 13-14 

Spencer Memorial 21 



GREENSBORO DISTRICT— J. H. Weav- 
er, Presiding Elder, Greensboro, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Randolph Ct., Mt. Vernon 2-3 

Spring Garden, p. m S 

Coleridge Ct., Coleridge 9-10 

Ramseur and F'ville, Ramseur 10-11 

Wesley Memorial, H. Pt., 11 a. m 17 

East and West, 3 p. m 17 

Main St., 7 p. m 17 

Randleman and Naomi, St. Paul ..23-24 

Asheboro 24-25 

Uwharrie Ct., Concord 30-31 

Denton Ct., Denton 31-1 

February 

Deep River, Cedar Falls 6-7 

West Market 13-14 

The district stewards will meet at West 
Market Street church, Tuesday, Dec. 1 
at 10 a. m. 



MT. AIRY DISTRICT— H. C. Sprinkle, 
Presiding Elder, Mt. Airy, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Leaksville, night 1-2 

Spray, night, 2; 11 a. m 8 

Draper, 3 p. m 2-3 

Danbury 9-10 

Rural Hall, Germanton 16-17 

Yadkin ville, Prospect 23-24 

Elkin, night 29-81 

Jonesville 30-31 

February 

Dobson, Stony Knoll 6-7 

Pilot Mountain, Pilot Mountain 13-14 

Ararat, Chestnut Grove 20-21 

Mt. Airy Ct., Zion 27-28 



NORTH WIL.KESBORO DISTRICT— J. H. 
Bennett, Presiding Elder, North 
Wllkesboro, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Jefferson, Bethany 9-10 

Helton, Sabbath Home 13 

Creston, Creston 16-17 

Watauga, Henson's Chapel 23-24 

Elk Park, Elk Park 30-31 

February 

Avery, Fairview 6-7 

Boone, Rutherwood 13-14 

Laurel Springs, Transon 20-21 

Sparta, Potato Creek 27-28 

The District Stewards, pastors, Sunday 
school superintendents and Lay Leaders 
are called to meet at North Wllkesboro, 
December 18, 19, 20. The meeting will 
begin at 2 p. m., on Friday, the 18th, in 
our church. Rev. Frank Slier will be 
present. 



SALISBURY DISTRICT— W. R. Ware, 
Presiding Elder, Salisbury, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Salem Ct., Salem 3-4 

Concord, Central, 11 a. m 10 

West Concord, Harmony, 3 p. m 10 

Concord, Epworth, night 10 

Kannapolis Station . .' 15-17 

Kannapolis Ct, Oak Grove 16-17 

China Grove and Landls, China Gr., 17-18 



Bethel and Love's Chapel, Bethel ..23-24 

Concord, Westford, night 24 

Gold Hill Ct., Gold Hill 30-31 

New London Ct., New London 30-febl 

District stewards' meeting Salisbury, 
Dec. 4, 10 a. m. 



STATESVI LLE DISTRICT— L. T. Mann, 
Presiding Elder, Stateavllle, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Stoney Point Ct., Stoney Pt., 11 a. m., 9-10 
Alexander Ct., Taylorsville, night ..10-11 

Maiden Ct., St. Paul, 11 a. m 16-17 

Newton Sta., Newton, night 17-18 

Hickory Ct., Marvin, 11 a. m 23-24 

Catawba Ct., Catawba, night 24-25 

Statesville Ct., N. S'ville, 11 a. m., 30-31 
Broad St., Broad St., night 31-Feb. 1 

February 

Mt. Zion and Huntersville, Mt. Zion, 

11 a. m 6-7 

Davidson, Davidson, night 7-8 

Mooresville Ct., Fair View, 11 a. m., 13-14 
Mooresville Sta., Mooresville, night, 14-16 
Cool Spring Ct., Cool Spg., 11 a. m., 20-21 
Troutman Ct., Shepherds, 11 a. m., 27-28 
The district stewards, pastors and lay 
leaders will meet In Broad Street church 
at Statesville on Thursday, Dec. 17, at 
12 o'clock noon. A full attendance of the 
above persons is earnestly urged. 



SHELBY DISTRICT— J. R. Scroggs. Pre- 
siding Elder, Shelby, N. C 
First Round 

January 

Belwood, Palm Tree 2-3 

Polkville, Polkville 3-4 

King's -Mountain, King's Mountain ..9-10 

South Fork, Russell's Chapel 16 

Lincolnton, Llncolnton 17 

Crouse, Crouse 23 

Stanly, Stanly 24-25 

Shelby Ct., Sharon 30 

MORGANTON DISTRICT— J. E. Gay, 
Presiding Elder, Marlon, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Thermal City, Pisgah 2-3 

Green River, Lebanon 9-10 

Broad River, Wesley's Chapel 16-17 

Henrietta and Caroleen, Henrietta ..17-18 

Cliff side, Cliffside 23-24 

Morganton Ct., Salem 30-31 

Connelly Springs, Rutherford College, 

31-Feb.l 
February 

Spruce Pine and Bakersville, Spruce 

Pine 6-7 

Micaville, South Toe 6-7 

Bald Creek, Bald Creek 13-14 

Burnsville I*" 16 

Marion Ct., Green Mountain 20-21 



WAYNESVILLE DISTRICT— L. T. Cor- 
ded, Presiding Elder, Asheville, N. C, 
R. F. D. No. 2 
First Round 

January 

Waynesville Station 9-10 

Sylva Charge, night 10 

Webster Ct., Cullowhee 16-17 

Glenville Ct., East La Porte 17-18 

Hayesville Ct., Oak Forest 23-24 

Murphy Ct., Tomotla 27-28 

Ranger Ct., Salem 21-80 

Murphy Station 31 

February 

Judson Ct., Maple Springs 2-3 

Robbinsville Ct., Robbinsville 4-6 

Andrews Station 6-7 

Macon Ct., Union 13-14 

Franklin Ct., Salem 16-17 

Highlands Ct., Highlands 18-19 

Franklin Station 21-22 

District stewards, pastors and lay lead- 
ers meeting at Bryson City Dec. 10. 



WINSTON DISTRICT— H. K. Boyer, 
Presiding Elder, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Davidson, Mount Olivet 2-3 

Salem, night 8 

Jackson Hill, New Hope 9-M 

Farmington, Farmington 16-17 

Mocksville, night IT 

Davie, Oak Grove 23-24 

Cooleemee, night 24 

Lewisville, Sharon 39-81 

February 

Kernersville, Kernersville *>T 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 
N. B. — Following schedule figures ar« 

published only as information and are 
not guaranteed. 

12:15 a. m.-No 32 daily Southern s 
Southeastern Limited. Pullman drawing- 
room, open section sleeping cars Jack- 
sonville and Augusta to New York. Din- 
ing car service. Day coaches. 

12:35 a. m. — No. 112, daily, local for 
Raleigh, Selma and Goldsboro. Pullman 
sleeping car Winston-Salem to Raleigh 
which is open at 9:30 and may be occu- 
pied in Raleigh until 7 a. m. 

1:42 a. m.-No. 30, daily, Birmingham 
Special. Pullman drawing-room and ob- 
servation sleeping cars Birmingham and 
Columbus to New York, and Birmingham 
to Richmond. Dining car service. Day 
CO£L chcs 

1:50 a. m. — No. 29 daily, Birmingham 




Early 
r Jersey Wakefield 



GROWN FROM EXPENSIVE SEED 

I pay from three to five times as much for Peter 
Henderson & Co.'s seed as other planters pay fox 
ordinary seecL Actual figures, $3.50 per lb. for 



Wakefields, $4.00 per lb. for Flat Dutch, against 75c. per lb. for ordinary seed. 
1 My customers get the benefit in 

PERFECT PLANTS AT NO EXTRA COST 

Why not plant cabbage grown from high-grade seed and raise a successful crop.- 
rather than use plants from inferior seed and be disappointed in the results? It 
costs no more. 

If I am out of the variety you want I will tell you. I NEVER SUBSTITUTE EX- 
| CEPT WHEN REQUESTED BY THE PURCHASER. 

Prices by Express: 1,000 to 4,000, $1.50 per 1,000; 5,000 to 9,000, $1.25 
per 1,000; 10,000 or over $1.00 per 1,000. 



Succession 




Varieties: Early Jersey Wakefield, Charleston 
Wakefield, Henderson's Succession, Flat Dutch, 
All Frost Proof. Order early to be sure of the 
variety you want. 



JOS. M.HARRISON 

CHARLESTON. SX. 




You The The The 
Decide: School: Methods: Results* 

»w Reasons Why You Should Enroll With Us 

We teach S ten otypy, the fastest method of writing. Our courses teach you<to 
know. We" train you to grasp your opportunity. Latest improved methods. Your 




choice of 
speed a: 




different systems of shorthand, two of them hold world's record for 
ccuracy. i 

s and terms moil reasonable. Real business courses as taught at a real 
•liege. Results unequalled. Twenty-five students recently placed in 

further information and terms. Do not put off this important step. 

L BUSINESS COLLEGE, ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 

T S. SPRADLIN, President 



Methodist Benevolent Association 

A Mutual Benefit Brotherhood for Southern Methodists. Issues Whole Life, 
90-Premium Life, Term to 60, and Disability-Old Age Certificates. Benefits, at 
death, disability, or old age. $150,000 paid widows, orphans, disabled. Reserve 
$30,000. For terms, etc., write J. H. SHUMAKER, Sec'y, Nashville, Tenn. 



Special. Pullman drawing-room and ob- 
servation sleeping cars New York and 
Richmond to Birmingham and Celumbus. 
Daily tourist car Washington to San 
Francisco via popular Sunset Route. Din- 
ing cars. Coaches. 

3:15 a. m. — No. 31 daily, The Southern's 
Southeastern Limited. Pullman drawing- 
room and open section sleeping cars New 
York to Jacksonville and Augusta. Din- 
ing car service. Day coaches. 

3:45 a. m. — No. 45 daily, local for Char- 
lotte, connecting for Atlanta and points 
south. 

7:10 a. m.-No. 8 daily, local for Rich- 
mond. 

7:15 a. m.-No. 37 daily, New York, At- 
lanta and New Orleans Limited. Solid 
Pullman train with observation and open 
section sleeping cars New York to New 
Orleans, and New York to Asheville, and 
Macon. Pullman parlor car Greensboro 
to Montgomery. Club car Washington to 
Montgomery. Dining car service. 

7:30 a. m.-No. 108 daily, local for Ral- 
eigh, Selma, and Goldsboro. 

7:40 a. m. — No. 154 daily, except Sunday 
for Ramseur. 

7:25 a. m. — No. 11, daily, local for At- 
lanta. Pullman sleeping cars Norfolk and 
Richmond to Charotte. Day coaches. 

8:15 a. m.-No. 237, daily, for Winston- 
Salem and North Wllkesboro. Pullman 
sleeping car Raleigh to Winston-Salem. 

8:20 a. m.— No. 133, dally, local for Mt. 
Airy. 

9:30 a. m.— No. 44, daily, for Washing- 
ton and points north. 

9:40 a. m.-No. 144, dally, Raleigh, Sel- 
ma and Goldsboro Pullman sleeping car 
Atlanta to Raleigh. 

12:30 p. m.-No. 21, daily, for Asheville 
and Waynesville, connecting at Asheville 
with Carolina Special for all points west. 
Chair car Goldsboro to Asheville. 

12:55 p. m. — Ne. 130, dally, local for San- 
ford, Fayetteville and Wilmington. 

1:30 p. m.-No. 7, daily, local for Char- 
lotte, connecting for Seneca and Colum- 
bia. 

1:30 p. m.-No. 36, daily U. S. Fast Mail 
for Washington, New York and points 
north'. Pullman sleeping cars New Or- 
leans and Birmingham to New York. Din- 
ing car service. Day coaches. 

2:00 p. m. — No. 207, daily, for Winston- 
Salem, connecting daily except Sunday for 
North Wllkesboro. 

2:30 p. m.-No. 161, dally, except Sun- 
day for Madison. 

3:30 p. m. — No. 230, daily, except Sun- 
day for Ramseur. 

4:15 p. m.— N». 22, daily, for Raleigh, 
Selma and Goldsboro. Chair car. 

5:05 p. m.-No. 131, dally, for Mt. Airy. 

6:25 p. m.— N». 35, daily, U. S. Fast 
Mail, for Atlanta. New Orleans and Bir- 
mingham. Pullman sleeping cars New 
York to New Orleans and Birmingham. 
Dining car service. Day coaches. 

6:35 p. m.-No. 235, daily, for Winston- 
Salem. 

7:15 p. m. — No. 132, dally local for 
Sanford. 

7:32 p. m. — N». 43, daily, for Alanta, 
and points south Sleeping car Raleigh to 
Atlanta. 

10:15 p. m.— No. 12, daily, local, for 
Richmond. Pullman sleeping cars Char- 
lotte to Richmond and Norfolk. 

10:20 p. m. — No. 233, dally, for Winston- 
Salem. _ , 

11:29 p. m.-No. 38, daily, New York, 
Atlanta and New Orleans Limited. Solid 
Pullman train with observation and open 



section sleeping cars New Orleans, Macon 
and Asheville to New York. Dining car. 

B. H. COAPMAN, Vice-President and 
General Manager, Washington, D. C. 

S. H. HARDWICK, P. T. M., Washington 
D. C. 

H. F. CARY, G. P. A., Washington, D. C. 
R. H DeBUTTS, D. P. A., Charlotte, 
N. C. 

C. G. PICKARD, P. and T. A., Greens- 
boro, N. C. 




BIG RETURNS FOR 
LITTLE INVESTMENT 

In Star Sweep Peed Orlnde 
Grind ear corn and small 
grain at home, with one 
horse or two. Guaranteed 
capacity .materials and work- 
manship. No 1 ong: drive ; no 
milltolls. Catalogforapost- 
card 

STAR MFG. 00., 
7DepotSt., Neirl,exlngt°ii,0. 



WEBSTER'S 
NEW 
INTERNATIONAL 
DICTIONARY 

THE MERRIAM WEBSTER 

The Only New unabridged dic- 
tionary in many years. 

Contains the pith and essence 
of an authoritative library. 
Covers every field of knowl- 
edge. An Encyclopedia in a 
single book. 

The Only Dictionary with the 
New Divided Page. 

400,000 Words. 2700 Pages. 
6000 Illustrations. Cost nearly 
half a million dollars. 

Let us tell you about this most 
remarkable single volume. 

Write for sample 
pages, full par- 
ticulars, etc. 




Page Sixteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 7, 1915 



i 
i 



PUBLISHER'S ANNOUNCEMENT 

=F0R THE NEW YEAR 

ADVOCATE DAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 17th 



A CONCERTED MOVEMENT WITH TWO AIMS 
1. To Increase Our Circulation 

The Board of Publication realizes that the matter of 
prime consideration is circulation. No matter how ex- 
cellent our paper may be it can not accomplish its mis- 
sion without a large circulation. We must find out how 
to get it into the homes of our people and induce them 
as far as possible to become interested in its contents. 
It is no small part of the task of the pastor to induce 
his people to become a reading people. To accomplish 
this he must furnish them something to read. The place 
to begin is with the periodical literature of his church, 
and first among these is the Conference paper. 

By agreement of the editor, Presiding Elders, 
Lay Leaders and Board of Missions in the meeting at 
Salisbury, in December, Sunday, January 17th, was set 
apart specially as Advocate Day, with the week follow- 
ing for special canvass with the view, if possible, of 
placing the paper in every home — certainly with the 
view of placing it in many new homes. 

2. To Secure the Renewals 

The management finds a great problem on its hands 
by hundreds of persons who failed to send in their 
renewals last year. We do not want to cut any off 
who mean to renew. On the other hand it is runious to 
the business to carry these along further if they do 
not intend to pay what they owe. So the second ob- 
ject of this Advocate Day and week is to secure these 
renewals and collect up back dues as far as possible and 
remove all from the list who will not make settlement. 
This year we must insist that pastors and churches see 
that this is attended to with as much diligence as the 
securing of new subscribers. We must have the pay- 
ment of arrears or the removal of names from the list. 
Co-operation in this matter will mean the saving of 
thousands of dollars. 

Prompt Renewals Necessary 
The Board has been compelled to request the mana- 
ger to urge the prompt renewal of subscriptions. The 
careless manner in which a large number deal with the 
Advocate in this respect is costing us a large amount 
each year. The Board does not wish any one deprived 
of his paper for even a single week, but judging from 
past experience it is absolutely necessary for us to adopt 
more nearly a cash-in-advanee system. We are now 
facing a financial problem on account of the falling off 
of our advertising business. The war scare has so para- 
lyzed business that our advertising managers have net 
only failed to develop new business, but have had to 
cancel most of the outstanding orders. This makes it 
necessary that we collect more closely on our subscrip- 
tion list. The Board has therefore requested the Mana- 
ger to send statements to all whose subscriptions have 
expired so as to remind them of the necessity for prompt 
renewal. It is too expensive to send these statements if 
it can be avoided, se we urge that renewals be attended 
to on Advocate Day, or during the week followings, be- 
fore it becomes necessary to send out statements. 

Throwing Away a Great Opportunity 
At great expense of toil, sacrifice and money we 
build a plant capable of sending a message every week 



into every home represented in otcj membership. By 
failure to co-operate on some plan that would make it 
possible to achieve this, we simply throw away a great 
opportunity — perhaps, in an important sense, the great- 
est opportunity open to us. In all our work as a 
church, whether it be in effort to promote evangelism, 
or to send the gospel to the regions beyond, we are 
dealing with the problem of ignorance. Enlightenment 
is the great essential if we would carry out our Master's 
Great Commission, and we must teach if we would 
evangelize and save. We are to go forth teaching men 
to observe whatsoever Jesus came to the world to re- 
veal; and while preaching is ever the chief agency of 
evangelization, we must not ignore the printed message 
which, more than all other agencies of enlightenment, pre- 
pares the way for the message of a living ministry. 

So Many People Do Not Read 

What if they do not read? It is our problem again 
not only to bring our people the printed message but to 
lead them to peruse and appreciate it. While it may be 
the most difficult duty of the pastor, it is, nevertheless, his 
duty to promote the reading habit among his people. 
The people will certainly not read our literature unless 
we somehow manage to place it in their hands. Therefore, 
the slogan which should never be abandoned is, "our 
church paper in every home." The process may seem 
very slow and the work may be exceedingly discour- 
aging, but if we keep on hammering away we shall after 
awhile reach the goal. When we have compassed this 
and our people become intelligently devoted to the 
church it will not be hard to tap the fountain of benefi- 
cence and send the streams of saving power to the ends 
of the earth. 

We act very foolishly if we do not work a periodical 
such as the North Carolina Christian Advocate for all 
that it is worth. The way to give it strength and virility 
is to give it circulation. Only in this way can we make 
it possible for the paper itself "to grip" the people 
with its messages from week to week. 

Our Job Department 

The Board calls attention again to the importance 
of patronizing our Job Printing Department. We now 
have a fine equipment and ample facilities for handling 
a general job business and the business has developed 
very satisfactorily; but only a few of our business men. 
here and yonder, seem to have thought of the impor- 
tance of patronizing this department. We are carry- 
ing on this business for no other reason than that of 
helping to make the Advocate. This fact ought to ap- 
peal to our people, and we feel assured it does when fully 
understood. 

With the hearty good will and support of the whole 
Conference, there is no reason why we may not double 
the circulation of the Advocate, and thus multiply its 
power for good by two, at the same time double our 
general printing business with little increase of expense, 
giving a very comfortable stipend to the worthy claim- 
ants upon our fund. 

THE BOARD OF PUBLICATION, 

Greensboro, N. C. 



norii) Carolina 



CDiistlan 





•Advocate 



Volume LX 



Official Oipt of Ik Western Borth i&rolina£onference 
nMboaist episcopal OurcU, Soutl) 



Greensboro, N. C, Thursday, January 14, 1915 



Let me today do something that shall take 

A little sadness from the world's vast store, 

And may I be so favored as to make 
Of joy's too scanty sum a little more. 

Let me not hurt, by any selfish deed 

Or thoughtless word, the heart of foe or friend; 

Nor would I pass, unseeing, worthy need, 
Or sin by silence when I should defend. 

However meager be my worldly wealth, 

Let me give something that shall aid my kind, 

A word of courage or a thought of health, 
Dropped as I pass for troubled hearts to find. 



Let me tonight look back across the span 
Twixt dawn and dark and to my conscience say 

Because of some good act to beast or man — 
The world is better that I lived today Ella Wheeler WH 



cox. 



Number 2 





/I 



Page Two 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 14, 1915 



North Carolina Christian Advocate 



Entered at the Post Office at Greensboro, N. C, as 
mail matter of the second class. 



HUGH M. BLAIR, ..... Editor 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One Year $1.50 

Six Months 75 

To all preachers of the Gospel, per year 1.00 

Make all remittances to 
Christian Advocate, - Greensboro, N. C. 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

It is not our custom to discontinue subscriptions 
when the time paid for expires, without notice. Sub- 
scribers who do not wish the paper continued should 
send notice to discontinue direct to the office. Oth- 
erwise they will be expected to pay for the paper 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

Those who wish the paper discontinued 
should send balance due direct to the Advocate 
office with special request to discontinue. We 
are not responsible when such requests are 
made to pastors. 

NEXT SUNDAY ADVOCATE DAY 

The editor, in behalf of himself and the 
Board of Publication, makes this final appeal 
to pastors and church leaders throughout the 
Conference. The business situation has cut off 
nearly all the usual income from advertising, 
and makes us almost entirely dependent upon 
the income from subscriptions. Some three or 
four thousand of the names on our list have not 
been renewed, many of them, for more than a 
year. Many of our very best people in all the 
churches have allowed the matter to go by and 
should now send $3.00 to advance their dates 
two years. If any pastor reading this wishes to 
verify this statement he can do so by looking 
over the list which is now in his possession. 
We sent out all these lists last month. 

The editor, who is also the business manager, 
dislikes to keep up a constant din on this sub- 
ject, and he is aware of the fact that there are 
others who would like to have a rest. So it 
had just as well be understood, once for all, 
that there will be no cessation of the din till 
we get our list in shape, and we have no one 
to whom we can appeal except the pastors. So 
the best way to get a rest from this din is to 
fall in and co-operate with us in our effort to 
wake up the sleepers. It might be well enough 
for each pastor to read this little message to 
his congregation next Sunday morning. 

The time has come when there must be co- 
operation in every pastoral charge if our Advo- 
cate is to reach the homes of the people and 
accomplish its work. The fact is, if there is not 
thorough co-operation the time may come when 
we will be confronted with the question of even 
existence itself. 

The editor realizes that most of our pas- 
tors are loyal to the Advocate, even to the ex- 
tent of making personal sacrifice for promot- 
ing its circulation. We greatly appreciate this 
cordial co-operation. So we are sure that these 
faithful men will understand that we make this 
urgent plea for the observance of the day, and 
week if need be, because of conditions that 
demand such an effort as we have never made 
before. Let our loyal laymen also fall in and 
support our pastors next week. We believe 
they will. 



CONFERENCE EVANGELISM 

By action of our last Annual Conference 
(see Journal, page 21), E. K. McLarty, Frank 
Siler, J. W. Moore, R. M. Courtney, E. A. 
Cole, J. F. Shinn and L. B. Rogers were 
appointed a special committee on Evangelism. 
Following what we had to say last week, we 
call attention now to the importance of taking 
this action of our Conference seriously and 
putting ourselves in position to so co-operate 
with this committee as to carry out the 
spirit of our resolution. As a Conference 
we need to take ourselves somewhat to task for 
"saying and doing not." For years it has 
been our habit to agree by resolution to do 
many things and straightway forget what man- 
ner of things these were, or what manner of 
covenant we had made for ourselves. Many 



most important matters are thus annually put 
to sleep by being referred to committees who 
fail to act, or by agreement in a final resolution 
which we never make any serious effort to carry 
out. 

Who will say that we have not even seared 
our consciences by an easy-going habit of thus 
trifling with the most sacred concerns of our 
ministry? So much is this true that it has 
become almost a matter of jest among us that 
any resolution can be passed in a religious 
body, provided it is presented late in the ses- 
sion — that such bodies are wont to destroy 
well-intended movements by committing them- 
selves in resolutions never intended to be car- 
ried out. The editor of the Advocate believes 
that the time has come for us to rid ourselves 
of this reproach, and seriously undertake to 
do all the things we agree to by resolution, fol- 
lowing the leadership of those whom we have 
set to lead us, and giving hearty co-operation to 
those upon whom we have laid grave responsi- 
bilities. 

It is the consensus of opinion among us that 
the greatest need of the church in Western 
North Carolina, as well as throughout the con- 
nection, is a great campaign of evangelism. 
There is agreement that we have reached the 
period when the prophet, standing in the midst 
of all the vast machinery of the organized 
church, must invoke the breath of life that 
these dry bones may live and stand upon their 
feet, a great multitude, to go forth to the con- 
quest of the world. The vast area of death ap- 
pearing before the prophet in the valley ot 
vision, could not have been less promising and 
more discouraging than the great mass of men 
and women making up the membership of the 
church today — ignorant of the world's needs; 
blind to the pitiful picture of destitution among 
so many of the race, and deaf to their cry of 
despair. This blindness, deafness — this inca- 
pacity of the great bulk of our people to re- 
spond to the insistent call for a great forward 
movement intended to give the message of 
life to the world in this generation, is calling 
us again to emphasize the latter part of our 
Lord's Great Command, "Beginning at Jerusa- 
lem." "Tarry ye in the city of Jerusalem 
till ye be endued with power from on high." 
These words of our Lord come sounding down 
through the centuries to rebuke those who 
would attempt to go upon this warfare disre- 
garding the conditions upon which success is 
assured. 

Is it extravagant to say that, for more than a 
quarter of a century, our missionary propagan- 
da has had no adequate base of supply? — that 
the dynamic force which God intended to give 
it propelling power and constant efficiency, 
has been wanting in large measure? Are we 
not as a church shamed by our failure to enlist 
the great majority of our people sympathetical- 
ly and- practically in this propaganda ? There 
is a reason for this, and it is no accident, nor 
is it an ill omen, that our Board of Missions 
should sound out this call to the church by con- 
stituting a Committee on Evangelism and set- 
ting about the task of getting the whole Confer- 
ence to co-operate. In this they have sounded 
the key note and we plead that the whole Con- 
ference join in harmony with the movement led 
by this committee. 

The first thing to be done is to utilize to the 
utmost the two men appointed specifically to 
evangelistic work. Rev D. H. Comann and Rev. 
W. L. Dawson should not be allowed to have 
idle time upon their hands. Two men upon 
whom God has set the seal of his approval, 
should find an open door for large service, es- 
pecially since we have set our seal of approval 
upon them by sending them forth into this work- 
Moreover, we embarrass them and embarrass 
our Committee on Evangelism if we fail to give 
hearty co-operation. 

The second demand is that our committee 
shall endeavor to map out a comprehensive 
scheme, which will touch all sections of the Con- 
ference and which shall involve the service of 
many other members of the Conference, besides 
the two men appointed specially to the work. 
This scheme should be completed at the earliest 
possible day and be put into operation, because 
the time is short and the days are evil. We ven- 
ture to suggest that each member of the Con- 
ference who feels inclined to give a little time 



to this special work outside of his own charge 
notify his presiding elder and the committee, 
and let them by consultation arrange for util- 
izing all such volunteer service. 

Finally, let all pray that God may direct this 
committee and open the way for the greatest 
season of pentecostal power ever witnessed in 
our Conference. We need this as we need 
nothing else, and the editor of the Advocate 
feels constrained to exhort the whole Confer- 
ence to join in prayer and effort till we see 
the whole multitude standing up, a living army. 



SUNDAY IN HIGH POINT 

Last Sunday was a great day for the congre- 
gation of Washington Street, High Point, which 
on that day assumed the new name Wesley 
Memorial. A more beautiful day never dawned 
than that which witnessed the christening of the 
new order of things for this great congregation. 
Everything was in readiness. For more than 
twelve months the new house of worship on 
North Main Street had been in process of con- 
struction, the last touches of decoration having 
been given so recently that they were barely 
dry. 

This new temple of worship, costing more 
than $60,000, and, in commodiousness and ar- 
chitectural beauty, second to none in North 
Carolina, has been built without any blare of 
trumpets — in fact so quietly that few people 
away from High Point have known what was 
going on. The congregation, however, has 
had a mind to build for some five years, and 
with this in view, purchased a very eligible 
lot in what seems an ideal location. Rev. J. 
H. Barnhardt labored on this enterprise 
throughout his term of four years and, just 
as they were almost ready to lay the cap stone 
his term ended and he had to go away. The 
good people of the charge who had so much en- 
joyed his ministry, did the handsome thing 
by uniting with the new pastor in inviting 
him to preach the opening sermon on the sec- 
ond Sunday in January. Following is the pro- 
gram of services carried out for the day: 

Morning 

9 :30 Sunday school, V. A. J. Idol, Superin- 
tendent. 
Program: — 

1. Opening services led by Rev. J. Ed 
Thompson, of Asheboro. 

2. Class assembly. 

3. Records and collections. 

4. Assembly of School, including Primary 
Department. 

5. Addresses by (1) Fred N. Tate, Mayor 
of the city; (2) Miss Lillian Massey; (3) Dr. 
Dred Peacock; (4) Prof. Thornwell Haynes; 
(5) Rev. H. M. Blair; (6) Dr. G. C. Rowe. 

6. Report of Secretary condensed as fol- 
lows : Total number present, 479 ; total collec- 
tion, $13.93 ; new scholars, 14. 

10 :30 Placing of Tablet. 

(1) Hymn. 

(2) Address by Rev. S. B. Turrentine, D. D. 

11 a. m. Opening Services. (1) Organ Vol- 
untary; (2) Doxology; (3) Invocation; (4) 
Hymn 78; (5) Creed; (6) Prayer— Rev. H. M. 
Blair; (7) Anthem; (8) Psalm 84 responsive — 
Dr. Turrentine; (9) Gloria; (10) New Testa- 
ment Lesson — Dr. Turrentine; (17) Notices — 
J. W. Harris; (12) Offertory; (13) Hymn No. 
207; (14) Introduction— Rev. W. H. Town- 
send; (15) Sermon — Rev. J. H. Barnhardt; 
(16) Prayer— Rev. H. C. Byrum; (17) An- 
nouncements; (18) Hymn No. 180; (19) Bene- 
diction — Rev. J. E. Thompson. 

The sermon was exceedingly appropriate, the 
text being Exodus 25 :8. Brother Barnhardt 
must have been at his best, for every word 
seemed fitly spoken and they were truly as 
characterized by Solomon, "apples of gold in 
pictures of silver. ' ' The whole occasion was one 
of supreme interest, the best of all being the 
conscious presence of the Invisible Guest, who 
sanctified the occasion as we believe by His 
presence. The great congregation filled all 
available space, the auditorium having a capac- 
ity of 1500. 

Rev. J. Ed Thompson, of Asheboro, a for- 
mer pastor, preached at night. Thus with appro- 
priate services passed one of the most delightful 
opening days ever enjoyed by any congregation. 



January 14, 1915 



NOKTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Three 



The day was as near a perfect day as could 
possibly be imagined, the beautiful sunlight 
blending in a striking picture the colors in the 
great cathedral windows. Everybody seemed 
happy and they had a right to be, Dr. Gilbert 
T. Rowe, the pastor, being chief if possible 
among those who rejoiced in view of the great 
opportunities now opening out before this great 
congregation. 



NOTE AND COMMENT 

For Expansion of Our Cotton Trade South 
America now seems to offer the greatest op- 
portunity. The South American Agent of the 
Southern Railway says:— "Of the $14,000,000 
of cotton goods imported by Chile in 1912, 
only $770,000 came from this country. Ger- 
many, whose trade is now cut off, supplied $3,- 
400,000, and Great Britain the rest. In the 
same year, Argentina bought $35,700,000, of 
which $5,527,000 came from Germany, over 
$17,000,000 from England and only $445,300 
from this country. Of the $18,000,000 of cot- 
ton goods imported by Brazil, $3,800,000 came 
from Germany, $11,000,000 from England, and 
only $329,000 from this country. Figures in 
regard to woolen goods and cutlery into the 
South American countries show similar oppor- 
tunity." 

If the European war should eventually drop 
a goodly portion of this trade into the lap of 
Uncle Sam there will be some compensation for 
the loss of foreign trade which is just now giv- 
ing him a rather tight squeeze. 

# * # # 

The North Carolina Legislature convened on 
"Wednesday of last week and organized by elect- 
ing Emmett R. Wooten, of Lenoir County, 
Speaker of the House of Representatives and 
O. Max Gardner, of Cleveland, President pro 
tern of the Senate. These elections took place 
without any very spirited contest. Not much 
business of importance has been transacted. The 
Governor's message was heard on Thursday. 
This message makes an urgent plea that as lib- 
eral provision as possible be made for the va- 
rious State institutions and for the Confed- 
erate soldiers who performed such valiant ser- 
vice in those trying days of 1861-65. The 
Governor also recommends a revision of the 
tax system so as to secure from all property in 
the state a just proportion of the necessary 
revenues. It is believed that this legislature will 
take up at an early day the legislation urged 
by the prohibition forces which will prevent 
the shipment of liquor into the state for bever- 
age purposes. There are many good men in 
both branches and it is believed that the con- 
servative element predominates. 

# # # * 

The State's Appropriations to state institu- 
tutions and to institutions receiving state aid 
make large figures in the aggregate. The Bibli- 
cal Recorder has taken the pains to collate these 
which we give to our readers as follows : 

School for Deaf and Dumb — $62,500 annually for 
support and maintenance and $7,750 for purchase of 
boiler and type-setting machine. 

Institution for Deaf and Dumb and Blind — $72,000 
annually for support and maintenance and $30,000 
for new location. 

State Hospital at Raleigh — $160,000 annually for 
support and maintenance. 

Soldier's Home — $35,000 annually for support and 
maintenance and $250 annually for marking graves 
of Confederate dead. 

Oxford Orphanage (white)— $20,000 annually for 
support and maintenance. 

Croatan Normal School — $2,250 annually for sup- 
port and maintenance. 

School for Colored Race (Winston-Salem) — $3,000, 
one-half for improvements and one-half for purchase 
of property. 

..Stonewall Jackson Training School — $18,000 an- 
nually for support and maintenance, and $7,000 an- 
nually for improvements. 

Guilford Battleground — $200 annually for erection 
of monuments and $500 for Guilford Battleground 
company. 

N. C. Room in Confederate Museum, Richmond, 
Va. — $200 annually. 

State Hospital at Morganton — $195,000 annually 
for support and maintenance and $50,000 for build- 
ings. 

University of North Carolina — $95,000 annually 
for support and maintenance and $50,000 annually 
for permanent improvements. 

State Normal and Industrial College — $90,000 an- 
nually for support and maintenance; $5,000 annually 
for maintenance of summer school and $50,000 for 



permanent improvements. 

Sanatorium for Tuberculosis — $12,500 annually 
for support and maintenance; $7,500 for support 
and maintenance of indigent patients, and $20,000 
for building. 

College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts — 
$80,000 for 1913 and $85,000 for 1914, both for sup- 
port and maintenance; $25,000 for new building 
and $5,000 for repairs. 

State Hospital at Goldsboro — $90,000 annually for 
support and maintenance and $5,000 for permanent 
improvements. 

Oxford Orphanage (colored) — $6,000 annually for 
support and maintenance and $4,000 for permanent 
improvements. 

Appalachian Training School — $12,500 annually 
for support and maintenance and $15,000 for perma- 
nent improvements. 

Cullowhee Normal and Industrial School — $10,000 
annually for support and maintenance and $15,000 
for permanent improvements. 

Bast Carolina Teachers' Training School — $45,000 
annually for support and maintenance, $40,000 for 
permanent improvements and $6,000 to pay certain 
debts. 

A. and M. College (colored)— $12,500 annually for 
support and maintenance and $17,500 for perma- 
nent improvements. 

• * • • 

An Event of the Past Week which created 
quite a sensation was a fire in the New York 
Subway, in which quite a number lost their 
lives and many others were injured. It was 
at first reported that more than one hundred 
lives were lost, but many who were overcome 
by suffocation were rescued and resuscitated. 
Only prompt work saved many from suffocation. 
The press account sent out next day says : ' ' The 
accident occurred between the Fiftieth and Fif- 
ty-ninth Street stations and called out virtually 
the entire fire ambulance service on Manhattan 
Island. The two trains, one express and a local, 
both packed, came to a stop midway between the 
stations and the lights went out. A large feed 
cable had blown out in its conduit some fifty 
yards distant and soon the cars were filled with 
the fumes of burning rubber. This soon grew 
unbearable and it took little to start a panic in 
the darkness. The demands of some of the pas- 
sengers that the doors be opened were refused 
by the guards, it was said. Fights ensued and 
there was soon in progress on both trains a 
desperate struggle to get out. Windows were 
smashed by the score ; men and women trampled 
each other and tore each other 's clothes in fear. 
AVhen the first of the panic-stricken passengers 
reached the street the report spread that there 
had been a terrible catastrophe in which many 
had been killed. Police and firemen quickly 
reached the scene, and although it was at length 
established that the reports were exaggerated 
they were busy more than three hours in the 
rescue work. They found in the two trains 
many passengers ; mostly women, half asphyxi- 
ated. Others had collapsed on the floor of the 
tube. Some were brought up by ladder through 
manholes, some through ventilating apertures 
in the street, ordinarily covered with ste«l grat- 
ing. 

# # # # 

All Have Agreed. The two Georgia Annual 
Conferences and the Florida Annual Confer- 
ence have all agreed to change of the charter of 
Emory College by which that institution be- 
comes the literary department of the Emory 
University of our Church to be built in this 
city. That means a great deal for Emory Col- 
lege and quite as much for the great university 
that is to be. Georgia and Florida Methodists 
have done wisely in making Emory College an 
essential part of the Emory University. Chan- 
cellor W. A. Candler and his co-laborers will 
now make the great institution just as rapidly 
as is best. — Wesleyan Christian Advocate. 

* * * * 

Peace Sunday. A movement inaugurated by 
the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ 
in America to have Sunday, February 14, ob- 
served as centenary peace Sunday, as one of 
the features of the celebration of 100 years of 
peace between the Unitel States and Great Brit- 
ain, is being responded to with enthusiasm by 
individual churches throughout the country. 

The British Reply to the American Note, 

protesting against interference with the com- 
merce of neutral powers, has been made public, 
and, while it maintains that the American note 
is in friendly spirit and the point of objection 



well taken, the British government insists that 
under reasonable suspicion of carrying contra- 
band, any vessels of neutral nations may be de- 
tained in ports till searched. The note is in 
friendly but firm spirit. To one looking on 
it would seem that the question once raised 
by the United States may yet cause serious 
friction if not a rupture between the 
two great English sneaking nations. This 
question shows the necessity of an international 
court to which all such questions might be 
referred with the assurance of an amicable and 
equitable adjustment. 



NOTES AND PERSONALS 

Let everybody read page 16 this week. It 
will be your last opportunity. 

—Miss Lillie May Smith and Mr. D. Webb 
Tucker were married at the parsonage of the 
Greensboro circuit on December 24th, Rev. F. 
L. Townsend, the pastor, performing the cer- 
emony. 

— Rev. J. W. Ingle, pastor of the Linwood 
circuit, preached for the Lexington congrega- 
tion on a recent Sunday night. The Dispatch 
referring to the sermon says : "He made a very 
favorable impression on those who heard him, 
the majority of whom were hearing him for 
the first time." 

— Dr. Thomas Lawrence, who, for nearly 
thirty years, had been at the head of the Nor- 
mal and Industrial Institute at Asheville, died 
at his home in that place on the morning of 
J anuary 6th. He was a man of scholarship and 
as a Presbyterian minister and educator had 
done a great work. He was past eighty-two 
years of age, having been born in Scotland 
June 5, 1832. 

— The stewards of the Lincolnton circuit of 
the M. E. Church, met last Friday with their 
pastor, Rev. N. M. Modlin at the parsonage, 
where they laid plans for aggressive work for 
the present year. The stewards were accompa- 
nied by the wives and other members of their 
families with well filled baskets, which was 
spread on one large table where all with one 
accord partook to their heart's content. They 
all returned home much happier after spend- 
ing a few hours together in pleasant commun- 
ion. — Lincoln Journal. 

—We make note from the Salisbury Post 
that the Ministerial Association, composed of 
the ministers of the different denominations of 
Salisbury and Spencer, for the coming year, 
elected Rev. C. F. Sherrill, pastor of our South 
Main Street Methodist church, Secretary. Rev. 
C. B. Heller, Presbyterian minister of Spencer, 
was elected president. Most cordial relations 
exist among the ministers of that prosperous 
twin-city, and in the union of the church forces 
of a town a strong influence for good, against 
evil, is expected. 

— Mrs. Lamyra Gorden, whom quite a num- 
ber of our Advocate readers will recall as one 
of the saints of the earlier history of the Meth- 
odist church at Elkin, passed away at the home 
of her daughter, Mrs. J. S. Bell, at Elkin, on 
Thursday. December 31. Mrs. Gordon had led 
a quiet and peaceable life and died at the 
ripe old age of 88. She was the grandmother 
of Mr. Walter B. Bell, who is well known in 
newspaper circles in North Carolina. 

— A recent issue of the Southern Christian 
Advocate had the following note, taken from the 
Hampton, South Carolina, Guardian, which will 
be of interest to many Advocate readers : : — 
"At the recent assembly of the 'Great San- 
hedrin' of Methodist ministers, held in Sumter, 
the Hampton charge drew a lucky number. We 
should consider ourselves lucky indeed in hav- 
ing sent to us Rev. J. T. Peeler, formerly of 
Charleston. Mr. Peeler is a young man, having 
served in his present capacity for only nine or 
ten years, but druing that time he ha* made 
for himself an enviable record. For the last 
four years he has been pastor of Hampstead 
Square Methodist church, of Charleston, and 
his work there was characterized throughout 
by progressiveness. Under his leadership the 
members of that church have recently erected 
one of the most up-to-date churches in the State. 
We welcome Mr. and Mrs. Peeler to our town 
and wish for them a continuance of the suc- 
cess they have heretofore experienced." 



Page Four 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 14, 1915 



I CONTRIBUTIONS f 

GERMANY IN PEACE AND IN WAR 

J. M. Rowland 
There comes to you a strange feeling as you 
first put your foot upon the shore of a strange 
country, and realize all about you, people, gov- 
ernment, language and all else that is strange. 
You feel lonely as you think how far away 
your country is — your loved ones, friends, and 
the hills of your nativity, while the wide old 
sea rolls between. And you appreciate your 
country more when among the foreign rags 
you see your own great Flag flying from the 
window of your country's ambassador or from 
a ship from home in the waters of a far away 
harbor. You feel like yelling with the voice 
of the storm: 

"Let music swell the breeze 
And ring from all the trees 

Sweet freedom's song. 
Let mortal tongues awake, 
Let all that breathe partake, 
Let rocks their silence break, 

The sound prolong!" 

You soon conclude we are the only folks that 
have a country anyway, and surely the, only 
ones that have any language with which to 
communicate. All this other goose-quacking, 
pig-grunting, gutteral glubbering, parrot-squal- 
ling way of communicating your complaints 
isn't talking. You get disgusted with it all, 
but you fall in with it very soon. It is sur- 
prising how soon you can learn to talk in a 
foreign language. You can soon catch on. Sit 
down at a table, rattle your goozle with a rapid 
repetition of gutteral sounds like you were 
gargling your throat for tonsilitis and then 
point at what you want. 

But after a while you meet some American. 
You are gladder to see him than if he had been 
Roosevelt or Santa Claus. You can't describe 
the sensation when, in the midst of all that 
foreign rabble, you run across a fellow from 
home. In the crowds of one of the German 
art galleries I butted into a black American 
South Carolina negro professor. It was all I 
could do to keep from falling on his neck and 
weeping for real joy. Never in my life did I 
know how good a genuine old black South Caro- 
lina negro looked. 

But of Germany I set out to write. We 
landed at Cuxhaven — the place the British 
airships swooped down on last week. It was 
the longest day in the year. The sun set at 
nearly 10 o'clock that night, just after we got 
away from the gurgling, sputtering acrobatic 
performances of the custom house. We thought 
perhaps the sun put off setting in order to 
welcome us, but we were told this was because 
we were so far north. We had a feeling of 
sadness at leaving our boat and our new-made 
friends. Some of them were very gracious 
to us. Two German ladies who sat by us were 
as pleasant as they could be. They informed 
us every name in Germany meant something. 
One of their names meant wooden shoe and 
the other sour pie. We told them we would 
never have dreamed it from their looks. 

It is not my purpose to "write up" Ger- 
many. That is being done by experts. I do 
desire to mention some personal impressions 
and some pertinent facts which may be help- 
ful to those who chance to read this, especial- 
ly just at this time when this little country 
is holding such an important position on the 
stage of the nations. We will first look at 
some favorable impressions and then at those 
unfavorable. 

The first thing that impressed me was the 
love for beauty and cleanliness that seemed 
to be imbedded in this nation. It was the 
neatest, cleanest, most beautiful country we 
ever saw. Their homes, farms, streets, public 
buildings — every thing is made as beautiful 
as they can make it. You see no trash, dirt 
or filth; no waste or ragged land is anywhere 
in sight. Fence corners, ditch banks, road- 
sides — all vacant spots — are filled with grain 



or beautiful flowers. They seem to love flow- 
ers more than any other people. They seem 
to think flowers are live creatures. All houses 
— even of the poorest — are beautifully planted 
with lovely flowers. In the cities the parks, 
public buildings, nearly all the windows of 
homes, are filled with a mass of flowers. Near- 
ly all houses have yards all full of flowers, 
and the yard is as much a private place as 
the chambers of the house. The gate is locked 
and you must ring the bell at the gate and 
wait to be admitted. Names of residents ap- 
pear on the gates with mail boxes. The beauty 
is carried into their farming. They alternate 
with little patches of different kinds and col- 
ors of crops in such even and artistic designs 
that the whole landscape seems to be a big 
crazy quilt Nature has drawn up about her 
for a quiet nap. They carry this sense of the 
beautiful into their public buildings. Archi- 
tecture is charming. Public buildings, inside 
and out, are made as attractive as it can be 
made not to be gaudy or too gorgeous. There 
is something that seems pleasing and appro- 
priate about the general appearance of every- 
thing. There are not skyscrapers, all city 
buildings being of uniform height. 

I was also impressed with the thrift and 
energy of Germany. I learned they had very 
few criminals and paupers. Everybody seemed 
to be busy with a soul set on fire to do some- 
thing. They are not afraid or ashamed of 
toil. Consequently they have developed their 
nation to a degree that is far ahead of what 
the average person thinks. They are far ahead 
of us in many lines of business and enterprise. 
Many of our finest articles come from them. 
Their country is full of factories. Their rail- 
road system was the finest we saw. The gov- 
ernment owns the railroads, telegraph and tel- 
ephone systems. Trains make splendid time 
and are very rarely late. The coaches are 
divided into compartments with glass doors 
and windows, the aisle being on the side of 
the coaches. In the compartments passengers 
face each other. As soon as a compartment 
is full a register at the door so states and 
no one is allowed to enter. Your door is 
locked and you are no more disturbed. You 
can see through the glass what is going on 
outside. When every seat is taken no one 
else is taken into a coach. The train is re- 
quired to furnish seats for all who travel. 
The sleepers are somewhat upon the same plan 
— nicely furnished with basin, washstand, 
soap and towels. All crossings are guarded 
and accidents are practically unknown. 

Jn education Germany is also ahead of us. 
The universities have long been known as the 
most famous of the earth. The most of the 
world's most renowned scientists are coming 
from these walls. But Germany's public school 
system is *great also. She has had compulsory 
education for sometime and has put the ban 
on ignorance before other nations were waking 
up. 

Another thing worthy of note is the pre- 
servation of forests in Germany. In this she 
leads the world. Her forests are under strict 
government control. A man is not allowed 
to cut trees on his own land until the govern- 
ment inspector has designated ones that should 
be cut and the ones that should not. All land 
owners are required also to plant trees each 
year. 

Another favorable impression I received was 
the recognition and appreciation that is shown 
to all who perform any service for the nation 
or contribute anything to the welfare of their 
fellows. All service seems to be remembered. 
Streets, towns, public buildings, are named 
for their prominent citizens, and on all sides 
are seen monuments, statues and tablets in 
their honor. Thus they keep before their peo- 
ple the deeds of their men and inspire the 
rising generation to great deeds. 

There were some things, however, that were 
very unfavorable about this great nation. One 
was the way it looks upon its women. To an 
American eye the German woman seems to be 
classed with the beasts of burden. The fields 
were full of women working. Women were 
working on the railroads, sweeping streets, 
tending parks, driving drays and doing all 
kinds of menial labor done by negroes in our 



country. Their idea of woman's place in civ- 
ilization is far lower than ours. Her business 
is to serve, that is all. 

A strange mode of conveyance was carts pull- 
ed by dogs, much of the hauling being done in 
this way. Usually the dog cart was a "two 
horse" arrangement with men, and very often 
a woman, hitched beside the dog to pull with 
him as well as direct his going. While it was 
shocking to see such a level for woman, it was 
another example of German thrift. They 
make everybody work, even the dogs. I did 
not see any dogs that were not working except 
a few poodles, and I felt sure that even Ger- 
man ingenuity could not get any service out of 
them. We could not but think if in our Amer- 
ican cities we could find employment for our 
stray dogs and then beat the Germans one by 
getting our stray cats to work, we could be- 
come a great nation. 

Another stain on Germany is its drinking. 
While the Germans drink very little whiskey, 
and think little of the man who does, they do 
drink great quantities of beer. It is consum- 
ed by all classes and both sexes, of all ages 
and at all times. You very seldom see a drunk 
man, but the long and constant use of beer 
is adding to the coarseness of the people, both 
in body and mind, and doing much to steel 
them against spiritual impressions. 

Another deplorable thing about this nation 
is the decline of its religious life. Germany is 
far from being a Christian nation. Nearly 
half of it is Roman Catholic, and Rome is do- 
ing every thing she can by intrigue and influ- 
ence, private and political, to make it entirely 
Roman. The State Church is German Luthe- 
ran but the church generally is spiritually 
dead and dried up with ritualism and worldli- 
ness. The government taxes the people to keep 
up the church. A great movement of ration- 
alism and religious freedom has swept the coun- 
try and the government has given all who de- 
sire to do so the right to go before an officer 
and file petition under oath to sever their con- 
nection with the church and avoid its tax. 
Many are doing this. It is putting a premium 
upon non-church life. Thus many are finding 
themselves out of the church. 

Another stain upon this nation is its military 
drunkenness. I know our President has or- 
dered us to be neutral. This is something I 
have never been able to be very long. If neu- 
trality means not aiding and abetting either 
side I am neutral. No enducement could make 
me enlist on either side. But if neutralitty 
means not having any feeling or convictions, 
and keeping from expressing yourself, I am 
not neutral. I can hardly see a dog fight and 
remain neutral. I tried to be neutral while I 
was in the war zone and in reach of German 
gun boats, but when I saw the American shore 
I shook my fist at the German Emperor and 
told him what I thought of him. All my blood 
and feeling went against him. He has been 
training his army for years for such an hour, 
and he had walked around Europe with a chip 
on his shoulder waiting for somebody to knock 
it off. He did not think England would enter 
the war but if she did he felt he could deal a 
quick blow against France, overpower her af- 
ter he had ground his iron heel in the blood 
of prostrate, bleeding Belgium to do it. This 
could be done before England could land her 
forces. If he once occupied Paris he could deal 
with the English and also meet Russia .as she 
cam,e down from the far north. He counted 
on a hard, quick blow, for that is his method. 
His dream was to annex France as he has an- 
nexed Belgium, then move on until he was Lord 
of Europe, and maybe later on, of the world. 
} do not forget that he refused England's de- 
mand to postpone hostilities until it could be 
settled by arbitration. What ever blame there 
is on others — and there is some — the Kaiser 
can not justify himself before the court of the 
world or the Bar of Almighty God for the 
part he has played in what his own son calls the 
silliest and most useless war the world has 
known. It does not lessen the condemnation 
because he goes forth calling upon God. His 
prayers are blasphemy in the sight of starving 
Belgium. Because he is the Kaiser he thinks 
he can manufacture a God to suit himself. No, 
I am not neutral. I don't want to see the Eng- 



January 14, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Five 



lish defeated and crushed by Germany. For if 
in this struggle Germany wins it will be the 
worst day that has dawned for English and 
American civilization. But I must stop. If 
this gets by the censor I shall mention some 
interesting facts about the German govern- 
ment later on. 

CHURCH EXTENSION AID 

W. F. McMurry 

The Annual Meeting of the Board of Church 
Extension will be held about May first. This 
is the meeting where applications for aid are 
considered. That those interested may know 
exactly how to proceed, the following is sub- 
mitted : 

1st. All applications must be made upon 
the printed form provided by the Board for 
that purpose. These application blanks may 
be had without cost by applying to this office. 

2nd. After the application has been prop- 
erly prepared, it should be sent at once to the 
Secretary of the Annual Conference Board as 
the following rule provides: 

"Every application for consideration at the 
hands of the General Board must first receive 
the approval of the Board of Church Exten 
sion of the Conference from which it comes, 
and said approval must be given at the regular 
meeting of said Board or of its Executive Com- 
mittee held in the month of March. Said 
Boards Or Committees shall consider all the 
applications from their respective Conferences 
and forward such as they approve so as to 
reach the Board's office at Louisville, Ky., by 
April 1st of each year. Each application so 
approved must have the action of the Con- 
ference Board written therein, certified by the 
President and Secretary, and all the applica- 
tions from a given Conference must be, by the 
Conference Board, graded and marked in the 
order of their relative importance, and the Sec- 
retary is hereby directed not to put on the 
Calendar any application not in conformity 
with this rule." 

3rd. The mid-year meetings of the Con- 
ference Boards or their Executive Committees 
are held in March. Do not fail to have your 
applications in the hands of your Conference 
Board Secretary by March 1st. 

4th. Personal representation in the interest 
of applications by other than members of the 
Board is not permitted, as the following rule 
declares : 

"The Board has not time to hear oral argu- 
ments or statements in behalf of applicants, 
and while considering applications for aid, its 
doors are closed. Representations other than 
those contained in the application can be made 
in writing or through members of the Board. 
A different rule would be obviously unfair to 
applicants too far away or too poor to send 
representatives." 

5th. It is well for building committees to 
remember that the general financial depres- 
sion which has embarrassed so many building 
operations, has also affected the Board of 
Church Extension, and particularly at the 
point of its receipts from out-standing loans. 
It is therefore not in position to take care of 
all the financial problems arising, many of 
which are due to the lack of fore-sight on the 
part of building committees. Some of our 
brethren seem to think that there is no end to 
the Board's resources. This is a mistake. 

6th. For further information, application 
blanks, etc., address W. F. McMurry, Corres- 
ponding Secretary, 1025 Brook Street, Louis- 
ville, Kentucky. 



GREETINGS FROM CALIFORNIA 

W. P. Andrews 

The Southern Methodists of California send 
greetings to their brethren and friends in oth- 
er States, and wish them, one and all, a very 
happy New Year. 

We (the Southern Methodists of California, 
for whom the undersigned speaks) are fully 
persuaded that you (our friends in other 
States) will realize this wish must fully, while 
contributing very largely to our happiness, by 



meeting us at the Panama-Pacific Exposition 
in San Francisco. 

Yes, the Exposition is to be held, and is to 
open on schedule time, February 20th. not- 
withstanding the European war. And it bids 
fair to be the greatest Exposition the world has 
ever known. The Exposition buildings prop- 
er, or magnificent proportions and architecture, 
on ideal grounds have about all been finished, 
while most of the state and foreign building* 
are well under way. 

"Are the nations at war included?" That 
they are: at any rate most of them. France 
has just cabled her building plans at a cost of 
$5,000 for the message, and ordered the work 
to proceed. -Japan's building and display will 
be unsurpassed by any. And so on. The ex- 
hibits are already arriving and being installed 
from every quarter of the globe. 

Arrangements are being made to provide 
headquarters for our Church, where our peo- 
ple can come and go, meet one another, etc. 
This will be a suite of rooms, most likely in 
the Pacific building, which is one of the larg- 
est office buildings in the city, in the center of 
the retail district. Definite information as to 
location will be given in due time. 

Come prepared to stay as long as possible. 
We want you not only to see the Exposition, 
San Francisco and the bay cities meanwhile 
enjoying our wonderful climate, but to see as 
much as possible of our great state and its 
many attractions. Those of you who have 
been in the habit of spending your vacations 
in Europe, we are sure will not regret having 
come this time to California, the combined 
Switzerland, Italy and France of your own 
country. 



THE MEETING OF THE FEDERAL COUN- 
CIL OF METHODISM 

On Wednesday of last week, the 16th inst., 
the Federal Council of Episcopal Methodism 
in this country met at the Georgian Terrace 
hotel in this city. The meeting was weel at- 
tended — nearly all of the members of the Coun- 
cil from each of the Churches were present. 
The session of the body took up two full days. 
The deliberations were in executive session 
and we can not therefore give out the full pro- 
ceedings. We only give now the substance 
of the most important acts, hoping later to give 
the exact text of the final resolution that was 
adopted. Interest throughout American Meth- 
odism centered in what has come to be known 
as "the Atlanta Situation,'" which in brief 
was: The Methodist Episcopal Church had 
purchased a lot on the north side of the city 
on which they proposed to move the present 
Egleston Memorial Church of this city. Act- 
ing under the agreements of the Federal Coun- 
cil concerning the overlapping of Churches by 
either the Methodist Episcopal, or the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, South, and believing 
that the Federal Council had full and final 
power to settle matters of this character the 
St. Mark's Quarterly Conference of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, South, in Atlanta, ap- 
pealed to the Federal Council to arrest this 
setting up of "altar against altar" here where 
Southern Methodism is meeting the needs of 
Methodism. 

It was generally agreed that this would be 
a test case, one by which future cases of a 
similar nature would be adjusted. 

When the matter came up the represents 
tives of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, on the Council withdrew the case the 
St. Mark's Quarterly Conference had brought 
against the Egleston Memorial Church of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. The members ol 
the Council from the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, based this withdrawal on the 
facts that the case on the part of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church had been pre-judged 
in that the press of that Church had discussed 
-both sides of the matter, and that only a few 
weeks before the meeting of the Council in this 
city the Board of Church Extension and Home 
Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
had appropriated $5,000 to aid the Egleston 
Memorial Church in building on the new site, 
thus ignoring the findings of the Council, not 



even waiting till that body passed on the case, 
thereby making any findings of the Council 
only a matter of opinion and not a verdict, so 
that whatever might be the decision of the 
case by the Council much harm would be done 
to each Church. Therefore, in the interests of 
American Methodism the case against the 
Egleston Memorial Church of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church was withdrawn. 

The representatives of our Church further 
agreed that since the conditions in Seattle, 
Washington, between the two churches show 
that the Methodist Episcopal Church is there 
very strong and ours weak, and that the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church can do for Methodism 
in that city what we as a Church can not do, 
recommended that the presiding bishop of our 
Church make no assignment of a preacher to 
that Church, and that our Board of Missions 
make no appropriation for the support of that 
congregation. We in short, withdraw from 
Seattle and leave it to the Metohdist Episcopal 
Church. 

Seeing that the Federal 'Council could not 
enforce the findings of the Council so far as 
the Methodist Episcopal Church is concerned, 
(their General Conference gave their repre- 
sentatives as did ours), plenary and final au- 
thority to settle all questions touching upon 
which the Council was to pass, a resolution 
was offered and adopted that the Federal Coun- 
cil will be called to meet again only after all 
the bishops and the boards shall have agreed 
to abide by the findings of the Council. With 
the adoption of that resolution the Council ad- 
journed. 

We reserve for fiiture comment some things 
which the late — and as we believe, the last — 
meeting of the Federal Council clearly dem- 
onstrate. In the light of what was done the 
representatives of Southern Methodism have 
once more done the magnanimous act, and put 
themselves and our entire Church beyond any 
justifiable criticism for any failure to make 
federation and fraternity real and not a sham. 
— Wesleyan Christian Advocate. 



A Prayer for Peace 

Almighty and Everlasting God, who hast 
made of one blood all nations of men for to 
dwell on all the face of the earth, and who 
hast taught us by the mouths of holy prophets, 
which have been since the woild began, that 
Thou art our Father and all men our brethren : 
Speak, we beseech Thee, amid the fear and sor- 
row of this hour, Thy rebuke of lust and hatred, 
violence and forec, lest w T e forget that all Thy 
laws are loving-kindness and all Thy paths are 
peace. Dispel the ignorance and blast the su- 
perstition which see in the drawn sword the se- 
curity of nations, that we may learn to trust, 
in quietness and confidence, the work of righ- 
teousness and love. Reveal to us our sins of 
prejudice and pride and passion, that we may 
see the sowing of the tares of misery now 
reaped in blood and tears and know Thy judg- 
ments still are true and righteous altogether. 
Comfort with Thy pity and shelter with Thy 
grace the unoffending women and helpless chil- 
dren who mourn their loved and lost, and flee 
in unfamiliar places the waste of fire and sword. 
Strengthen those who minister to the wounded 
and forsaken. Bless the peacemakers of every 
land who live in hope and work in faith. Stay 
the tide of slaughter now ravaging the world. 
And speed, oh, speed the happy day, foreseen 
of old, when all nations and races and peoples 
shall be one, and wars and rumors of wars be 
at last no more. Amen. — Rev. John Haynes 
Holmes, in New York Herald. 



Let us beware of losing our enthusiasm. Let 
us ever glory in something, and strive to retain 
our admiration for all that would ennoble, and 
our interest in all that would enrich and beau- 
tify our life. — Phillips Brooks. 



There are few signs in a soul's state more 
alarming than that of religious indifference; 
that is, the spirit of thinking all religions equal- 
ly true, the real meaning of which is, th°t 
all religions are equally false. — F. W. Rolsr- 
son. 



Page Six 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 14, 1915 



j INTERESTING NEWS FROM FIELD 



NOTES AND PERSONALS 

— The episcopal residence in Charlotte, which 
is to be occupied by Bishop John C. Kilgo and 
family, is nearing completion. 

—Rev. J. 0. Guthrie, of the North Caro- 
lina Conference, now occupying a supernumer- 
ary relation, was a visitor in Greensboro last 
Friday and made the Advocate a very pleas- 
ant call. 

— The senior class of Greensboro College for 
Women is greatly bereaved because of the 
death of Miss Mary Brown, one of their num- 
ber, which occurred at the home of her parents 
at Greenville, N. C, during the holidays. 

— Miss Lelia Tuttle has been spending a while 
with her brother, Rev. D. H. Tuttle, in Bur- 
lington, and the News speaks in high terms 
of a series of lectures which she has delivered 
to the congregation at Front Street church. 

— Swannanoa Methodist church held a mass 
meeting on Sunday, Jan. 10, in the interest of 
the Anti-Saloon League and elected Rev. P. C. 
Battle as a delegate to represent the communi- 
ty in the meeting at Raleigh, Jan. 13-14. 

— On the evening of Dec. 24th Miss Daisy 
Taylor and Mr. W. Leonard "Warner were unit- 
ed in marriage at the home of the bride's par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. L. Z. Taylor, in Salisbury. 
Rev. C. F. Sherrill, the bride's pastor, per- 
formed the ceremony. 

— Rev. J. H. Bennett, the new presiding eld- 
er of the North AVilkesboro District, is winning 
golden opinions among the people of that dis- 
trict. We are gratified to hear of the vigorous 
manner with which he has taken hold of the 
work. 

— Rev. D. H. Comann is now in the second 
week with Rev. A. R. Bell at Carraway Memo- 
rial. Large congregations are attending and 
manifesting a growing interest. Brother Co- 
mann is doing some very effective preaching 
and many are praying for large results. 

— Rev. T.J. Eskridge, of the Holston Con- 
ference and Presiding Elder of the Knoxville 
District, spent a few days visiting his parents 
and other relatives about Shelby last week. 
Brother Eskridge is one of the boys who went 
out from among us, of whose record we are 
proud. 

— Rev. and Mrs. B. A. York, of the Hickory 
circuit, were kindly remembered by the con- 
gregation at Rocky Mount just before Christ- 
mas. They gave the pastor and wife a nice 
pounding for which Brother and Sister York 
express their thanks through the local paper. 

— Rev. Dr. Thomas C. Darst, formerly of 
Richmond, was consecrated as Bishop of the 
Diocese of East Carolina on January 6th at 
Wilmington, N. C. He succeeds the late Bish- 
op Robert Strange as Bishop of the East Caro- 
lina Diocese. 

— Our readers will be interested to learn that 
Rev. R. C. Beaman, D. D., and Miss Mattie 
Clements, of Henderson, were married last 
Wednesday afternoon at the home of the bride's 
niece, Mrs. Lloyd Smith, at Farmville, N. C. 
Immediately after the marriage Rev. and Mrs. 
Beaman left for a bridal tour through Florida. 
— Raleigh Christian Advocate. 

— An elegant donation party was given Rev. 
and Mrs. C. F. Sherrill, of 'the South Main 
Street Methodist church, Salisbury, on New 
Year's night. The church host that gathered 
in the parsonage filled it with good cheer and 
left the larder well supplied. The year starts 
off auspiciously for the pastor and that no- 
ble people. 

— Rev. and Mrs. L. S. Massey, of Raleigh, 
were visitors in the city last Friday and made 
a pleasant call at the Advocate office. Brother 
Massey is making a splendid paper for the 
North Carolina Conference, and it is a great 
pleasure to have him tell of toils and trials 
of which we are in position to have a, very 
keen appreciation. The "Old Raleigh" was 
raver better than it is under the editorship of 
E mother Massey. 



Granite Falls — Rev. W. V. Honeycutt, pas- 
tor of our church at Granite Falls, reports the 
work starting off nicely for the year. Every- 
thing is hopeful. A large crowd came to the 
parsonage on Saturday night, January 9th, and 
gave the pastor and family a liberal pounding, 
leaving good cheer and gratitude behind them. 



Salisbury District — The presiding elder, Rev. 
W. R. Ware, requests us to publish the fol- 
lowing explanation : 

The appropriation from Board of Missions to 
Landis circuit at our recent Conference was in- 
tended for Kannapolis circuit. There is now 
no Landis circuit. Landis church was put with 
China Grove. The rest of the churches on 
the former Landis circuit with Rock's Grove 
form the Kannapolis circuit. This was done 
at Conference. 



Sulphur Springs — Rev. T. A. Groce, pastor of 
the Sulphur Springs circuit, reports his work 
starting off well. He is holding revival ser- 
vices at Mount Morenci this week, assisted by 
Rev. E. M. Hoyle, of Haywood Street, Ashe- 
ville. He requests the Advocate to thank Mess . 
J. J. Mackey and M. M. Sullivan, of Ashe- 
ville, for $5.00 each on the Pisgah church. We 
trust Sunday school superintendents will re- 
spond to his call for help to furnish this 
church. It is a worthy cause. 



South Main Street, Salisbury — The Sunday 
school is in a flourishing condition. Two hun- 
dred and fifty were present Sunday morning. 
The pastor and superintendent say they must 
now go to three hundred and fifty. The school 
has a large and growing Baraca class. Last 
Sunday being the first Sunday in the new year, 
was one of great interest. A large number of 
people heard a plain and practical new year's 
sermon by Rev. C. F. Sherrill. The one pleasant 
feature of this service was the neat speech made 
by the pastor in presenting Rev. Tubbs a purse 
of money in token of love of the people and 
Brother Tubbs' elegant and graceful reply. The 
church was packed and every available space 
was filled and chairs had to be brought in. 
The service was of great interest, four joined 
the church, and many said they never heard a 
better sermon. — Salisbury Post. 



From Newton — I wish to thank our friends 
for many nice things brought to the parsonage, 
last week. Newton people do not only ' ' pound ' ' 
the new preacher, but it is repeatel annually. In 
fact, good things are being brought to the par- 
sonage almost daily. I know of no charge in 
the Conference where the preacher and his 
family are more thoughtfully cared for than 
at Newton. 

Our Sunday school did unusually good 
work last year — not from a standpoint of en- 
rollment, which was only 484, but from the 
kind of work done. A large class of young 
people are just now completing the Teacher's 
Training Course. Most of these will have class- 
es in the regular school this year. Brother 
Bacon, who has been superintendent so long, 
does not grow old or stale in his work. He 
is the kind of Bacon that one likes to meet 
often, because he leaves you smiling. Miss 
Matt Cochran has recently been elected super- 
intendent of the Primary Department. She is 
r<^<rarded one of the best teachers in the state 
nnd our school is fortunate in having her at 
the head of this department. We had 328 pres- 
ent in Sundajr school last Sunday and it was 
not a special occasion. 

The raising of our pledge of $600.00 has been 
completed to continue our special missionary, 
E. W. Anderson, in Korea. 

The attendance at church as well as the 
"hnrch membership, has been steadily increas- 
ing. W. M. Biles. 



owing to some special work in behalf of the 
Southern Assembly, he would be unable to 
reach all the institutes as he had agreed. He 
has promised definitely to be at High Point and 
possibly at the remaining meetings. He will 
be present in Charlotte Sunday, January 31st, 
to preach, morning and evening, to the Confer- 
ence Woman's Missionary Society at the An- 
nual Meeting in Tryon Street church. 



To Sunday School Superintendents 

I am asking through the Advocate, all the 
superintendents who will to send me at once 
from their schools $1.00 for buying seats for 
the Pisgah church. We want to be ready to use 
the new church by March- 1st, where we lost 
our church last spring by fire. I want to 
ask the Sunday schools of Asheville District 
to lead out on this proposition. Can I depend 
on one hundred and twenty-five Sunday school 
superintendents to put this matter before their 
schools and only ask for $1.00 to help people 
that will appreciate it ? Yours fraternally, 

Candler, N. C. T. A. Groce. 



Notice 

The preachers, lay leaders and Sunday 
school superintendents of Shelby District will 
convene at Lincolnton at 10 o'clock a. m., Satur- 
day, Jan. 16th. Brother Siler will conduct 
the meeting. Dr. E. K. McLarty will speak 
at 10 o 'clock on Lay Activities and Evangelism. 
The afternoon will be taken up with live ques- 
tions pertaining to district work. Bishop 
James Atkins will deliver an address on Satur- 
day night. Let all come. 

J. R. Scroggs, P. E. 



Conference Brotherhood 

Assessment No. 12 — Since last report the fol- 
lowing have paid on this assessment : A. S. Ra- 
per, N. R. Richardson, W. H. Willis, James 
Willson, J. B. Tabor, P. E. Parker, W. S. 
Hales, B. F. Hargett, R. M. Taylor, W. W. 
Bays, F. L. Townsend, T. F. Marr, 
CM. Campbell, W. S. Cherry, O.J. Jones, 
R. L. Doggett, J. A. Wiggins, T. J. Ogbur'n, 
W. E. Poovey, O. P. Ader, W. F. Elliott, 
R. G. Tuttle, E. P. Stabler, A. L. Latham. 
The following honorary members have also paid 
this assessment since last report : J. A. Bell, D. 
H. Anderson, J. W. Gulledge, F. E. Durfee, 
E. E. Gray, C. W. Tillett, J. C. Watson, 
J. W. Earnhardt, A. S. Webb, B. L. Ownby; 
J. A. Claywell, A. G. Ford, P. G. Moore, 
Guy Weaver, J. W. Long, C. R. Hoey, J. B. 
Sherrill, G. F. Ivey, J. S. Carr, J. K. Norfleet, 
Mrs. J. S. Spencer, G. T. Roth, E. A. Cole, 
J. B. Ivey, W. T. Wilkinson, C. H. Ireland and 
W. H. Nicholson. 

The time for paying this assessment, for all 
who joined at Conference, will expire on the 
16th of January. Most of the brethren have 
paid, but a few have not. 

C. M. Pickens, Sec. and Treas. 

Spencer, N. C. 



Bishop Atkins' Appointments 

Rev. Frank Siler received word from Bishop 
Atkins too late for last week's Advocate, that, 



Rev. E. H. Bogle 

Rev. E. H. Bogle (my father) died at his 
home in Bristol, Tenn,, Dec. 26th. He had been 
a member of the Holston Conference for about 
45 years. He had been a superannuate for 
eight years. He was a classmate of Bishop 
E. E. Hoss, they having been close friends 
through life. He was a first cousin of Dr. 
W. E. Munsey. 

The funeral services were held in State Street 
Methodist church, Bristol, conducted by his old 
friend of boyhood days, Dr. Geo. D. Frnch, 
assisted by Rev. T. R. Handy and others. 
Some fifteen of the Holston preachers nearby 
acted as pallbearers. 

He had lived for four years in the city of 
Bristol, where he was the agent for the Ameri- 
can Bible Society. He was universally loved 
and honored in that city as well as in the other 
places where he had lived. He is survived by 
his widow and the children, Rev. L. P. Bo- 
He, Marion Bogle, of Los Angeles, CaE ; Mun- 
sey Bogle, of Columbus, O. : Mrs. OUie Hall, of 
Roanoke, Va. ; Mrs. Laura Turner, of Roanoke, 
Va. ; Mrs. Hattie Pavne, of Washington - City ; 
Bvrd Bogle, Texas City, Texas ; Barney Bogle, 
Phillipine Islands. 

My father had' been stationed at Murphy, 



» 



January 14, 1915 



NOETH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Waynesville and Franklin in this Conference, 
when the "Western section belonged to Holston 
Conference. L. P. Bogle. 



Missionary Notes from Field Secretary 

Jan. 2, First Church, Salisbury, Jno. W. 
Moore, P. C. — $43.00, cash and subscriptions 
l for Conference Mission Special. 

Jan. 3, Iredell Ct., P. H. Brittain, P. C — 
10 a. m., Olin; $8.40 pledged to Foreign Mis- 
sion Special; 11 a. m., church organized for 
every member canvass. 3 pm. Snow Creek; 
$9.00 pledged to Foreign Mission Special. 
Church organized for every member canvass. 
7 p. m., Turnersburg; $42.50 cash for Confer- 
ence Mission Special 

Jan. 7-10, Thomasville, D. M. Litaker, P . C . 
Brother Litaker had committees all appointed 
and things in Sreadiness for institute, with 
every member canvass Sunday afternoon for 
Conference assessments, and Rev. S. A. Stew- 
art, of Japan. Result : over $600.00 subscribed 
and others to hear from. His committee on 
evangelism is stressing the morning watch in 
congregations and personal, daily evangelism. 
The social service committee has over $200.00 
on hand for the poor. This church has some 
of the choice laymen of the Conference. Broth- 
er Charles Lambeth, brother to our pastor at 
Reidsville, superintends an up-to-date Sunday 
school which pays $200.00 annually to the 
Children's. Home. His father is chairman of 
the missionary committee of the church, and 
with the' entire Lambeth connection at Thomas- 
ville, liberally contributes time and money to 
the various interests of the church. 

I was guest part of the time of Prof, and 
Mrs. J. N. Hauss, whom I married while pas- 
tor in Asheville. Prof. Hauss has been for 
thirteen years superintendent of the graded 
schools of Thomasville. His cultured wife is 
the president of the Woman's Missionary Soci- 
ety. 

Dr. Chas. W. Byrd will take Bishop At- 
kins' place at institutes of the Morganton, 
Statesville and Charlotte districts, speaking at 
Forest City Thursday night, Jan. 14th ; States- 
ville, Friday night, Jan. 15th, and at Marsh- 
ville, Wednesday night, Jan. 20. Bishop At- 
kins will attend the Greensboro and Winston 
District Institutes at High Point and Lexing- 
ton. 



From Woodleaf to Winston-Salem 

Dear Advocate : — The passing of a Methodist 
Annual Conference is an occasion of changing 
and the moving of the preachers. It is like 
the revolution of the kaleidoscope — a shuffling 
of the Conference, and new and different scenes 
appear. And so I have moved again, and like 
a star in occultation, being in the superannuate 
relation, I have gone into "winter quarters," 
and cozily domicilled in the home of another. 
I have come all the way from Woodleaf, where 
I have been living for the past two years, to 
Winston-Salem, and feel that I am "on rising 
ground." And this, too, without sheading any 
tears over the move, like some preachers I have 
known to do in moving from one good paying 
station to another equally as good or better, al- 
though it was with reluctance and deep regret 
that we parted with our many warm friends 
in that community. 

For the past seven years I have been mostly 
serving charges embracing parts of three coun- 
ties, and sometimes it was difficult to tell 
exactly where I was. The sun would rise and 
set in the wrong place, and the trains come and 
go the wrong way. Here they both come and go 
the right way, but it is not so easy to tell 
exactly where I am. I came to live, for this 
year at least, in the Twin-City, but it seems 
that I have gotten past that and am living in 
Southside, which is in the country. But we 
are in close touch with the city and churches 
by means of the car line. There is a line of 
demarkation differentiating Winston from Sa- 
lem, but they are one city — two in unity. While 
the city has corporate limits, it is not easy 
to tell where either side of the dividing line 
stops, for they are not bound by corporate lim- 
its, and both are stretching out and spreading 
over the hills of Forsyth County at all the cardi- 



nal points. So, where am I? Some say I live 
in Winston-Salem-Southside ; others, in the 
country ; but a reporter caught me on the train, 
and when he found out I was living over here, 
the very next day he published me as "living 
in Salem." But now, Mr. Editor, if you will 
print one of the Advocate labels, Rev. James 
Willson, 304 Holly Road, Southside, Winston- 
Salem, N. C, and put it on a copy I will be sure 
and glad to get and read the paper. 

I have been living over here about a month 
and a half, embracing the Christmas season, 
but have seen comparatively little of the city 
and the churches. As you know, during this 
time, we have had exceedingly bad and disa- 
greeable weather, and the church services have 
not been so largely attended. I have attend- 
ed only four at the 11 o'clock hour, and can- 
not now venture anything for print, either of 
the city, the churches or the preachers. 

James Willson. 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Gleanings from the Conference Minutes 
W. H. Willis 

In membership the Charlotte District leads 
the Conference, the number of which being 12,- 
320. Statesville District had the primacy a 
year ago. 

Jackson Hill, Concord circuit, and Connelly 
Springs lead in number added on profession of 
faith. Nine charges are blank on this item, six 
of them being stations or half stations' and three 
of them being circuits. 

Statesville district leads in infant baptisms 
and in professios of faith. The infant bap- 
tisms of that distict being greater than those 
of the Asheville, Franklin, Mt. Airy, North 
Wilkesboro and Winston combined. Mt. Airy 
gets the booby. 

Centenary (Winston), West Market and 
Thomasville lead in Sunday school enrollment. 
This puts Thomasville in fast company. Lin- 
wood, Rock Springs and Troutman circuit 
run them close rolls. 

The five charges showing largest amounts 
for all purposes in order are Centenary (Win- 
ston, $21,647; West Market, $19,129; Trvon 
St., $17,021 ; High Point, $16,173 ; West End, 
$13,187. 

There are 176 charges with deficits on the 
Conference collections. Only nineteen of these 
are failure due to the assessment for Chil- 
dren's Home. 

Fifty-seven charges report missionary spe- 
cials. Of these twenty-three failed on the as- 
sessments for Conference collections. In but 
a few instances was the special large enough 
to equal the deficit in assessment. 

In total payments for Foreign, Home and 
Conference Missions, the Waynesville, North 
Wilkesboro and Morganton districts showed 
an increase over 1913. Aljl other districts 
showed a decrease. 

In per cent, of salaries paid Charlotte and 
Greensboro districts lead, with a percentage 
of 98 2-10 each. The records of the others 
in order are Salisbury, 97 ; Winston, 96 ; Shel- 
by, 95; Asheville, 94; Mt. Airy, 92; Waynes- 
ville. 92; Statesville- 91; North Wilkesboro, 
91 ; Morganton 90. 

In per cent of Conference collections paid 
(not including Children's Home), Winston dis- 
trict leads with 91 per cent. The record of 
the others are : Greensboro, 89 ; Charlotte, 81 ; 
Statesville, 78; Salisbury, 77; Charlotte, 74; 
North Wilkesboro, 74; Mt. Airy, 73, Waynes- 
ville, 72 ; Shelby, 65 ; Morganton, 60. 

In per capita paid for all purposes Greens- 
boro district is at the top with $9.19. The 
others follow : Charlotte, $7.01 ; Asheville. 7.00 ; 
Winston. $6.82 ; Salisbury, $6.03 ; North Wilkes- 
boro, $4.88; Statesville, $4.66; Shelby, $4.52; 
Waynesville, $4.44; Mt. Airy, $4.28; Morgan- 
ton, $3.95. 

The total reported for all sorts of missions, 
i. e., Foreign, Home, Conference, from both 
specials and assessments, including also the 
amount reported by the women, is $80,201. 
Some of that raised in Sunday schools is prob- 
ably not included in this, while that reported 
by the women is not all of a missionary char- 
acter. The figures in the Journal last year are 
$79,860 ; gain, $3.*1. 



Omnium Gatherum 

By Itinerant 

The resolution to hold the Conference later 
should have been passed The finances would 
have been many thousands of dollars better if 
the Conference had been held on the date first 
announced. Some people may be able to pay 
one time as well as another, but many cannot. 
The sympathy for "the poor mountain preacher 
moving in mid winter," is largely a "booga- 
boo. " 

The law in the Discipline requires that the 
assessment be made in weekly, monthly or quar- 
terly installments. The stewards are not al- 
lowed to assess any one by the year. The MetU- 
odist itinerant who has solemnly vowed to de- 
vote his whole time to the work of the ministry 
(and every member of the Conference has) 
and who faces a board of stewards who are his 
sole dependance for a support, for himself and 
family, and yet who do not provide this sup- 
port, and, who faces, on the other hand, the 
declaration of Scripture, that "He that provid- 
eth not for his own * * * hath denied the faith 
and is worse than an infidel," is between two 
fires that try his metal. 

We have stressed the importance of growth in 
numbers until many of our pastors have not the 
courage to get rid of a quantity of names on 
many registers, some of them dead, some lost 
sight of. some of them no manner of account to 
the church whatsoever, because of piire trifling- 
ness ; and yet some who are outbreaking sinners. 
Did you say get them saved? Yes, do so if 
you can, but if we have not thrown over- 
board free moral agency, we will have to admit 
that two are required to bind such a contract, 
and they may not consent to be saved. Then, but 
one honorable course is left us, and that is to 
expel them. 

# * # * 

I am a great lover of good looks. Perhaps 
very few' of our preachers get too many of the 
right kind. But it seems to me the time has 
come when some one ought to say that the 
voung preachers cannot afford to buy every book 
that some "leading divine," or human either 
for that matter, declares is indispensible. Get 
a reasonable number of the great masterpieces, 
thoroughly master them and make them your 
own. Study the Bible more than any other 
book. If you commence a book, and find that 
the author has more so-called reverance for 
the truth than he has for Jesus Christ and di- 
vine things, drop the book as quick as you 
would a hot iron. 

ft ft ft ft 

Perhaps the leading falacy of those who re- 
ject the law of the tithes is to assume that those 
who set apart one tenth of their net income as 
sa cred to the Lord 's cause, are determined to do 
what they please with the other nine-tenths. 
But it is far more likely that the one who sets 
apart a definite portion of his income to God's 
kingdom, will use the whole of it wisely, than 
one who says that it all belongs to God, yet does 
not give God any of it, except as he is prompted 
by impulse or geverned by haphazard. 

# # # # 

Few people seem to have any idea how much 
work a pastor has to do. All kinds of demands 
are made upon his time. I have some books in 
my library that I have been waiting years and 
■>^ears for a chance to study. They are of a kind 
that cannot be studied without plenty of time, 
and uninterrupted and undisturbed opportun- 
ity, and this does not come. I had a neighbor 
once who would ask me, every time he met me 
^ominjr in from the country in the week time, if 
I had had an appointment somewhere. 

# * # # 

There are so many of our people who know so 
Tittle about our church. They do not have the 
Discipline, and do not take the church paper. 
No wonder some of them are so easily led off 
iiito other churches. It is wonderful how some 
neople compass sea and land, especially the 
sea, to get one member from the Methodist 
f hurch. When they have gotten him, thev ™- 
.ioice more about it than if they get ninety and 
nine sinners from the world. 



Page Eight 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 14, 191f 



Depf 



>artment of Woman's Work 

Conducted by Mrs. W. R. Harris, Asheville, N. C. 
SUNSHINE 



A little gold amidst the gray, 

That's sunshine; 
A little brightness on the way, 

That's sunshine; 
A little glimpsing of the blue, 
A little widening of the view, 
A little heaven breaking through, 

That's sunshine. 

A little looking for the light, 

That's sunshine; 
A little patience through the night, 

That's sunshine; 
A little bowing of the will, 
A little resting on the hill, 
A little standing very still, 

That's sunshine. 

A little smiling through the tears, 

That's sunshine; 
A little faith behind the fears, 

That's sunshine; 
A little folding of the hand, 
A little yielding of demand, 
A little grace to understand, 

That's sunshine. 

— Stuart MacLean. 



REV. JOHN NELSON COLE 

Many hearts in North Carolina 
were saddened by the announcement 
of the death of Rev. John Nelson Cole 
father of Mrs. Plato Durham, our Con 
ference Second Vice-President, which 
occurred at Charlotte on Friday, Jan- 
uary 1st, 1915, following an illness ex 
tending over several weeks. Many of 
us were unaware of the critical con 
dition of his health and his passing 
came as a distinct surprise. 

Truly a great, good and useful man 
has fallen. As a pastor for many 
years, Dr. Cole was exceedingly (Pop- 
ular. Of a kind, gentle nature, big- 
hearted and sympathetic he was pe- 
culiarly fitted for the superintenden- 
cy of the orphanage, a position he 
had held most acceptably since 1904. 
As a friend has said of him, "the 
crowning glory of his beautiful life 
was his ten years of service at the 
head of this institution." 'Twas a 
most beautiful tribute paid him by 
Bishop Kilgo in his funeral service 
when he said so truly of him: "He 
has access to God, he walked with 
God and was a daily companion of his 
Heavenly Father. It was his posses- 
sion of the power of love that enabled 
him to see daylight in the darkest 
storm, the God in the flowers, eter- 
nity in the tick of a watch." 

"We would extend to the bereaved 
family our tenderest and most heart- 
felt sympathy in their sorrow, and 
pray God's blessings upon them. 

"Precious in the sight of the Lord 
is the death of His saints." 

"That they may rest from their la- 
bors and their works do follow them." 



On the morning of December 27th, 
in the stillness of a quiet abbath, the 
death angel visited the home of our 
Conference Third Vice-President, Miss 
Cora Earp, and claimed as its victim 
the devoted mother of the home, after 
an illness of ten weeks. 

"Truly God's hand touched her and 
she slept." So gentle was her going 
that is came "like the shadow of a 
passing cloud." 

She leaves behind her a patient, 
faithful record of a well-spent life as 
a heritage to her children. 

To the bereaved ones in their sor- 
row we extend our sincere sympathy 
and commend them to God who alone 
can give comfort in an hour of sor- 
row like theirs. 



officers and for the benefit of our Con- 
ference officers and District Secreta- 
ries we give them as we feel sure 
each conference officer is anxious to 
communicate with the new auxiliary 
officers in the planning of the work 
for 1915. We hope to have others re- 
ported to us. 

Asheville District 

Central Church, Asheville — Presi- 
dent, Mrs. V. L. Stone; 1st vice-presi- 
dent, Mrs. J. T. Sevier; 2nd vice-presi- 
dent, Mrs. W. R. Harris; superintend- 
ent of mission study and publicity, 
Mrs. T. C. Smith; superintendent of 
social service, Mrs. J. J. Yates; record- 
ing secretary, Mrs. W. H. Donnell, 
corresponding secretary, Mrs. W. B. 
Davis; treasurer, Mrs. J. W. Grimes; 
superintendent of supplies, Mrs. H. C. 
Johnson; agent of Voice, Mrs. W. 
Hunnicutt. 



spiration that only such a meeting as 
we hope to have can give. 

When? January 29th-Febuary 3rd, 
1915. 

Where? Tryon St. Church, Char- 
lotte, N. C. 

Send names of delegates to Mrs. E. 
N. Clemence, North Church Street, 
Charlotte, N. C. 



PLEDGE CARDS 



J. 



Charlotte District 



Morven — President, Miss Mamie 
Walsh; 1st vice-president, Mrs. M. H. 
Lowery; 2nd vice-president, Mrs. J. E. 
Wooseley; superintendent of mission 
study and publicity, Mrs. J. L. Little; 
recording secretary and treasurer, Mrs. 
M. H. Lowery; corresponding secreta- 
ry, Mrs. M. J. Dean; agent Voice, Mrs. 
J. L. Little. 

Mount Airy District 

Elkin — President, Mrs. Mason Lil- 
lard; 1st vice-president, Mrs. E. F. 
McNeer; 2nd vice-president, Mrs. A. 
M. Smith; superintendent of mission 
study and publicity, Mrs. H. D. Mc- 
Kaughan; superintendent of social 
service, Mrs. A. G. Click; superintend 
ent of supplies, Mrs. Alex. Chatham 
Sr.; recording secretary, Mrs. W. E 
Paul; corresponding secretary, Mrs. 
W. W. Whitaker; treasurer, Mrs 
G. T. Roth; agent for Voice, Mrs R. 
L Hubbard. 

Salisbury District 

Albemarle — President, Mrs. R. G. 
Tuttle; 1st vice-president, Mrs. L. F 
Magruder; 2nd vice-president, Mrs. J, 
N. Anderson; superintendent of mis- 
sion study and publicity, Mrs. J. M. 
Brown; superintendent of social ser- 
vice, Miss Lesca Freeman; superint- 
endent of supplies, Mrs. W. A. Smith; 
recording secretary, Mrs. J. F. Laton; 
corresponding secretary and treasurer, 
Mrs. G. P. Watkins; agent for Voice, 
Mrs. D. A. Shankle. 

Spencer — President, Mrs. C. M. Pick- 
ens; 1st vice-president, Mrs. B. F. Ste- 
venson; 2nd vice-president, Mrs. C. M. 
Bobbitt; superintendent of mission 
study, Mrs. G. L. Steele; superintend- 
ent of social service, Mrs. R. M. Holt; su- 
perintendent of publicity, Mrs. J. D. 
Carter; superintendent of supplies, 
Mrs. H. W. Holt; recording secretary, 
Mrs. C. M. Wiseman; corresponding 
secretary, Miss Lizzie Carrick; treas- 
urer, Mrs. J. A. Cook; agent Voice, 
Mrs. F. I. Devereux. 



NEW OFFICERS OF AUXILIARIES 

\ number of auxiliaries have sent 
US the names of their newly elected 



ANNUAL MEETING AGAIN 

We are so anxious to have a full 
representation at the coming Annual 
Meeting that we are going to call at- 
tention to it every issue so that there 
may not be a person in the W. N. C. 
Conference who is not familiar with 
the date and place of meeting. 

Then, too, we want to enlist the 
prayers of every missionary worker 
in the Conference for the meeting. 
The officers feel the rsponsibility of 
this, one of the most important meet- 
ings we have ever held, and they 
want the prayers of every worker in 
the Conference that God may bless our 
coming together to His glory. 

"On to Charlotte" should be our slo- 
gan for the next two weeks. We need 
the inspiration of the meeting — the In- 



Do yon use the Pledge Cards in 
your auxiliary? Have you held the 
pledge meeting and by this means 
found out what your society is will- 
ing to do for the cause of missions 
during the coming year? It is urged 
that every auxiliary hold a pledge 
meeting in January and use the cards 
that have been so successfully used 
during 1914. These cards have been 
seat to your district secretary and 
if you have not secured them for use 
in your auxiliary write her right 
away and it will be her pleasure to 
see that you are supplied. Hear what 
Mrs. J. W. Perry, our Council Supt. 
of Mission Study and Publicity, has 
to say in the following article, en- 
titled, 

The Use of the Pledge Cards 

The offering of our substance to 
God, next to the offering of our 
prayers, is the surest means of keep- 
ing alive a sense of dependence upon 
Him and of the filial relation we sus- 
tain to Him. The giving back at 
regular intervals of some definite por- 
tion of what God gives to us does in 
a visible, tangible, and most impress- 
ive way express the gratitude of the 
heart for mercies received, keeps 
alive the sense of gratitude, and is an 
acknowledgement- of our entire de- 
pendence upon His goodness and mer- 
cy. 

In the matter of giving, we depend 
too often upon some appeal to the 
emotions that excites our pity and to 
some impulse awakened by stories 
breathing pathos and tenderness. 
Gifts are made for the most part to 
something in which we are personally 
interested. Too much dependence 
has been placed upon sentiment rath- 
er than principle. 

The word of God, both in the Old 
and the New Testaments, teaches the 
necessity of system and method, as 
well as right motive, in the making of 
offerings to the Lord. The same au 
thority teaches that the financial obli 
gation rests upon every individual, not 
alone upon those who attend upon the 
public services, though that is most im 
portant also. "Upon the first day of 
the week let each of you lay by him 
in store as God hath prospered him" 
— 'this is the plan given by the apostle 
Paul to the Church at Corinth. And 
that plan has never been improved up- 
on. 

To help the members of our mission- 
ary societies to put into practice this 
Scriptural rule, it is asked that ait the 
beginning of the year each member will 
state just what amount the society may 
expect from her. January has been 
fixed as our pledge month, and it is 
asked that each auxiliary secure a def- 
inite pledge, from every member of the 
society and from others who, though 
not members, are interested and will- 
ing to make an offering for our wo- 
man's work. It would be a great work, 
but not too much to undertake, if the 
members in our society would give to 
every woman in the Southern Metho- 
dist Church an opportunity to make an 
offering to our woman s work for the 
year 1915. 

To aid in making possible such an 
appeal and to make easy and simple 
the registration of pledges, a card pro- 
vided for the purpose is most helpful — 
the pledge card. There are many ad- 
vantages in using this card. It makes 
the canvass much easier. It promotes 
more systematic giving, because each 
one is asked to state just how she 
wishes to make the payments. It helps 
to keep in mind what the obligation 
is and stimulates to promptness in 
meeting it. It enables the Board to 
know In advance what may be expect- 



ed, so that its expenditures may b 
governed accordingly. It is educativ 
in that it cultivates the habit of re 
ular, systematic giving and keeps th 
cause constantly before the mind an 
on the conscience. The use of th 
card emphasizes the importance of th 
small offering as well as the larg 
one, -and encourages those who do no 
feel able to give a large sum. It lead 
people to plan ahead for their offei 
ing. When we have no definite goa: 
no fixed plan, we are sure to do littl 
or nothing, except under the stimu 
lus of some great appeal. It encoui 
ages the habit of giving from a sens 
of duty, for the sake of Christ an< 
for the extension of His kingdom, 
helps us to recognize giving as a par 
of worship just as truly as the offer 
ing of prayers and praise. "Honor th 
Lord with thy substance, and with th 
firstfruits of all thine increase: so shal 
thy barns be filled with plenty, an< 
thy presses shall burst out with nev> 
wine." 



1915 



PRAYER CIRCLE FOR 
January 

Prayer for officers and members o 
our Council. 

Our Trust 

"Having an eternal gospel to pro 
claim unto them that dwell on th« 
earth and unto every nation and tribe 
and tongue and people." 

Our Prayer 
Our Father and our God, our hands, 
our hearts are lifted to thee. Hear 
thou and answer. Reveal thyself in us, 
thou who hast made us co-laborers 
with thy Son in saving thy world, co- 
redeemers with Jesus Christ in making 
known thy love to a world restling in 
selfishness and sin, We pray thee, give 
us the mind that was in Christ Jesus, 
that we may see men as he saw them, 
and seeing them as they are in thy 
sight, we may love them as he loved 
them. Give us thyself, that we may 
be willing so to represent thee in our 
lives that we may be in narrow spheres 
and in our larger works saviours be- 
cause we reflect thy image. Bless thou 
the work of our hands, establish thou 
is at it is according to thy will. 

Our Work 

We are working for all who mourn 
and need comfort, for all who are 
weary and need rest, for all who are 
friendless and want friendship, for all 
who are homeless and want sheltering 
love, for all who pray and for all who 
do not but ought, for all who sin and 
need a Saviour, and for whosoever 
will oome to Jesus Christ. 

January 1-8 
Pray for Miss Bennett, the President 
of the Council, that she may have 
health and strength and prolonged life; 
that she may have wisdom and love 
and power; that the grace of the Lord 
may be upon her. 

January 8-15 
Pray for Mrs. E. F. Stephens, First 
Vice-President of the Council, that she 
may have wisdom in planning and 
power in projecting the work for the 
young people of our church; for Mrs. 
W. A. Albright, Second Vice-President 
of the Council, that all children may 
catch a vision of love and service and 
life through the work in her depart- 
ment. 

January 15-22 

Pray for Miss Mabel Head, Secretary 
of the Foreign Department; Mrs. R. W. 
MacDonnell, Secretary of the Home De- 
partment; Mrs. F. H. E. Ross, Treasur. 
er; Mrs. H. R. Steele, Educational Sec- 
retary; Mrs. B. W. Lipscomb, Secre- 
tary of the Home Bass; that they may 
realize that service is ever the high- 
est expression of love — it is love in ac- 
tion—that they may be held by the 
power of love and so filled with the 
spirit of love that they may impart it 
unto others; that they may he brought 
into such a stale of calmness and trust 
and faith that they may catch the 
heavenly vision and see life in the 
light of Him who Is the Way, the 
Truth and the Life. 



January 14, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Nine 



| Epworth League Department 

T Conducted by Miss A. Stanly Hall, Hickory, N. O. 



DISTRICT SECRETARIES 

Asheville 

H. E. Walter Asheville 

Charlotte 

Miss Leola Hannon, Box 1056, Charlotte 
Winston 

F. T. Scarborough Winston-Salem 

Greensboro 

Miss Lillian Massey High Point 

Morganton 

Rev. J. F. Armstrong Henrietta 

North Wilkesboro 

Rev. J. M. Downum Boone 

Salisbury 

Miss Estelle Crowell Salisbury 

Statesville 

Herbert H. Lowry Ne-vrton 

Mount Airy 

Rev. A. L. Aycock Leaksville 

Shelby 

Miss Delia Nolen Gastonia 

Waynesville 

Miss Margaret Rogers Franklin 

Superintendent Junior Leagues 
Mrs. C. M. Pickens Cornelius 



League Study Clesses, January 17. 
(Duet. 11:18-21; Prov. 15:28; 1 Pet. 
3:15b.) 

Thousands of professing Christians 
have no particular aim in life. They 
drift along year by year, never reach- 
ing anything in particular. The only 
new thing they know is the gossip of 
the neighborhood, or some thought they 
just happen to receive. Everyone 
should secure a comprehensive knowl- 
edge of every nation in the world — its 
history, the manners and customs of 
the people, and particularly their reli- 
gion or religions. We have some of 
the views of these nations brought to 
our doors every morning. The news 
is up-to-date. But after all, how little 
we know about the nations! What 
about the religious condition of the 
millions of India, China, Japan, Africa? 
With what are they trying to satisfy 
the soul's deepest needs? What changes 
are now taking place among the peo- 
ple? Have we not something com- 
mitted to us which they need as much 
as they need daily bread? The ad- 
vantages of a mission study class in 
every League ought not to need any 
argument. The study will be found to 
be fascinating. For the foreign field, 
the book recommended to be studied 
at this time is "The Social Aspect of 
Foreign Missions," by W. H. P. Faunce. 
Home missions also are to be studied. 
"The New Home Missions," by H. Paul 
Douglas, is the book recommended. 
Both books will be studied with de- 
light. The purpose of the study is: 

1. "That the whole Church may be 
intelligent regarding the social appli- 
cation of Christianity throughout the 
v* orld." 

2. "That social aspiration and broth- 
erhood may be expressed in public and 
private worship." 

3. "That the Church may adequately 
support its work at home and abroad, 
and that the every-member canvass 
may become a permanent practice." 

4. That each church may become a 
community force for righteousness, it- 
self embodying its ideal for the world. 

There are three courses in Bible 
study: 

1. The Church of the First Apostles. 

2. The Earliest Portrait of Jesus. 

3. The Poets and Prophets of the 
Old Testament. 

The price of the books need not hold 
anyone back. Secure a leader thor- 
oughly competent to present the sub- 
ject. Let him tell what it will mean 
to the chapter intellectually and spir- 
itually. Aim difinitely at an organiza- 
tion. Decide which course shall be 
the first to be studied. Do things so 



that all may be prepared for a life of 
usefulness. 

By Rev. Samuel Warner, Ph.D. 



HOW TO LIVE 

Christ was only teaching us how to 
live when he said: "A new command- 
ment I give unto you, that ye love 
one another." He taught us that our 
willingness and readiness to forgive 
was an expression of our love. He 
taught his disciples to pray, "Forgive 
us our debts as we forgive our debt- 
ors." Suppose we do not forgive. 
Then we practically pray that we may 
remain unforgiven. For we pray that 
we may be forgiven as we forgive our 
debtors. As Christians we hope to be 
like Christ. Do we imagine we can 
be like him when we refuse to for- 
give? It is said that, when ,painting 
his famous picture, "The Last Sup- 
per," da Vinci gave to Judas the like- 
ness of a person against whom he 
had a grudge. Afterwards he miser- 
ably failed in every attempt to paint 
the likeness of Christ. One day he re- 
lented toward his enemy and wiped 
out the face of Judas. That night, 
tradition reports, he had a glorious 
vision of the Christ which he was able 
to transfer to the canvas. Let us also 
know that we get our truest vision of 
the Christ when we forgive the tres- 
passes of those who have trespassed 
against us. — Western Christian Advo- 
cate. 



THE GOAL OF LIFE 

The goal of life is the glory of God. 
it any purpose less worthy than this 
animates the life, the soul will fail 
to reach its highest development and 
to accomplish its noblest work. Mo- 
tives make the man; and when our 
supreme purpose in life is to do al- 
ways those things that will glorify 
God and advance the interests of his 
kingdom, we have put into life a con- 
trolling motive and purpose that will 
not fail us in the end. Only such a 
motive is worthy to be made the con- 
trolling and animating purpose of our 
life. — Christian Observer. 



LISTENING TIMES 

What we need above all things in 
these crowded days is the setting 
apart of many listening times — times 
of quiet in which we can hear the 
heavenly voices that call to us unre- 
garded in the busy day. 

God has something to say to us 
which, in the whirl of our earthly am- 
bitions, we can not hear; and he 
makes the noises of the outer world 
to cease that he may speak to the 
soul. 

Sometimes he "tries us in the night," 
sometimes he "giveth songs in the 
night," sometimes he gives us "a vis- 
ion in the night;" but all of these we 
shall utterly miss if there is no quiet 
time in which he can come near to 
us. There are many ways of prepar- 
ing to receive blessing from on high; 
but one of the most essential is this: 
"Commune with your own heart, and 
be still."— G. H. Knight. 



Standard Form 
Collection Envelopes 



GARTSIDE'S IRON RUST SOAP 
CO., 4054 Lancaster Ave., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. Gartsides Iron Rust Soap 
(U. S. registered patent No. 3477) re- 
moves iron rust, ink and all unwash- 
able stains from clothing, marble, 
etc., with magical effect. Good sell- 
er, big margins. House-to-house 
agents and store salesmen wanted. 
The original, 25c a tube. Beware of 
infringements and the penalty for 
making, selling and using an infring- 
ed article. Suitable for Church Fairs, 
etc, 



Western North Carolina Conference 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South 

HOLT'S C H A P E L 



FOR PASTOR'S SALARY 



AMOUNT 



tNjame 



Date 



79/.. 



Dollar* Cent* 



MISSIONS AND CONFERENCE COLLECTIONS 

Western North Carolina Conference 

Methodist Episcopal Church, South 

MOUNT ZION CHURCH 



Name- 
Dale .. 



Dolla 



Cents 



$1.90 for lOOO, delivered 

$1.40 for additional 1000, delivered 
FOR EITHER FORM 



This price is based on using the above forms, changing name of church 
only. The large envelope is manila, and of the quality regularly used for 
Pastor's Salary collections. The small envelope can be furnished in white, 
green or cherry. Its difference in color and size from the Pastor's Salary 
form makes it ideal for Missions and Conference Collections. 

If special form is desired the price will average $2.40 for the first 1 000, 
and $1 40 for additional 1000's, delivered. 

Special rates on large quantities. 

The Advocate Press, Greensboro, N. C. 



Carolina & Northwestern Rwy- Co. 

Schedule Effective October 18th, 1914 



Northbound 


NO. 10 
Passenger 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 8 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 6 
Passenger 
Sun. Only 


NO. 50 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 52 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


Chester Lv. 


7 50 a m 

8 36 

9 21! 
9 30 

10 23 

11 05 

12 05 p m 

1 08 

2 OOx 
4 09 
4 35 








4 15 pm 

6 38 
8 20 


Yorkville " 








Gastonia " 








Gastonia ." 


4 30 p m 

5 40 

6 44 

7 SO 

8 50 






Lineolnton ' ' 








Newton " 








Lenoir " 


12 05 p m 
1 08 


6 45 am 
8 07 




L»noir " 




Mortimer ' ' 










Edgemont Ar. 










Southbound 


NO. 9 
Passenger 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 7 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 5 
Passenger 
Sun. Only 


NO. 51 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 53 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


Edgemont It, 


9 00 a m 
9 10 
11 20! 

1 85 pm 

2 35 

3 05 

3 43 

4 30 

5 05x 

5 54 

6 40 










Mortimer " 










Lenoir " 










Lenoir " 

Hickorv " 

Newton .... ' ' 


7 00 a m 

8 15 

9 00 
9 51 

11 23 


8 15 a m 

9 12 


1 10 pm 
3 20 




LirK-'i'iiton " 








Gu>toiila " 








loisL'inin _ " 






11 50 a m 
1 24 

3 10 p m 


Vnrk villi! " 








i'h»*l«r_ Ar. 

















.\ l.odve 



CONNECTIONS 



Arrive 



CHESTER— Southern Railway, S. A. L. and L. & C. 
Y/OKK V1L T .E— Sou hern RHilwav Lf NGOLNTON— S. A. L. 

■ ".ASTON I A- Southern Railway Piedmont & Northern Railway 
NEWTON and HICKORY — Southern Railway 



E. F. RE1D. G. P, A s t. 



CHESTER, S. C. ♦ 



Page Ten 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 14, 1915 



Our Foreign Advertising is in Charge of 
Jacobs & Co., Clinton, S. C, 

SOLICITING OFFICES: 

New York— 118 E. 28th St E. L. Gould 

Chicago— 420 Advertising Bldg.._W. B. Porcher 

Detroit— Hotel Tuller C. L. Winn 

St. Louis— 1500 Central Natl. BankBldg., 

M. E. Gammon 

Nashville— 161 8th Ave. N J. M. Riddle, Jr. 

Atlanta— Wesley Memorial Bldg... J. B. Keough 

Asheville, N. C— 421 S. Main St G. H. Ligon 

Philadelphia— 1421 Arch St A. O'Daniel 

Richmond, Va.— Murphy Hotel— _J. W. Ligon 



REVIVAL AMONG BRITISH 
SOLDIERS 

Remarkable Scenes Among the Troops 
in Training on Salisbury Plain. Ten 
Thousand Soldiers Join Pocket 
Testament League. Mor- 
als of Soldiers Im- 
proved 

By George T. B. Davis 

A remarkable Bible revival is in 
progress among the British soldiers 
quartered on Salisbury Plain and else- 
where in England. Already more than 
10,000 of the troops on Salisbury 
Plain alone have joined the Pocket 
Testament League, and have agreed 
to carry a Testament with them and 
read a chapter daily, and over 3,000 
have declared their acceptance of 
Christ and enlisted under the banner 
of the King of Kings. 

The movement began some time ago 
when Charles M. Alexander, the well- 
known Gospel song leader, accompa- 
nied by two soloists, a pianist, and a 
representative of the Pocket Testa- 
ment League, spent five days travel- 
ing from oneY. M. C. A. marquee to 
another on the Plain, holding Gospel 
meetings. From the beginning the 
meetings were a great success. The 
soldiers crowded into the marquees, 
and when the tents were filled, they 
let down the sides and the men stood 
outside during the service. 

Gospels as Hymn Books 

The meetings began with the pre- 
sentation to each soldier of the Pock- 
et Testament League editions of the 
Gospel of Sf. John, containing hymns, 
pictures and stories. Using the gos- 
pel as a hymn book, Mr. Alexander 
led the men in singing appropriate 
hymns. The men quickly caught up 
the new choruses, such as "I am In- 
cluded" and "Good-by, God Bless You," 
while they rang out lustily the famil- 
iar strains of the "Glory Song" and 
"Tell Mother I'll be There." Now and 
then the famous song-leader called 
upon one of the soloists to sing a 
hymn such as "My Mother's Prayer," 
or "Will the Circle be Unbroken?" 
Again Mr. Alexander would stop the 
soldiers in the midst of a hymn and 
give them a straight talk on the man- 
liness of living a clean Christian life. 

At the opportune moment the idea 
of the Pocket Testament League was 
explained, and the men were told how 
during the last six years the move- 
ment had swept round the world, and 
hundreds of thousands of all classes 
from one end of the world to the oth- 
er had been enrolled in the League 
by making it the rule of their lives 
to carry a Testament with them and 
read at least one chapter daily. Spe- 
cial Testaments with waterproofs cov- 
ers, weighing only 2% ounces, publish- 
ed by the Pocket Testament League 
Headquarters, 47 Paternoster Row, 
London, were offered to any soldier 
who wished to join. It was clearly 
stated, however, that in order to se- 
a league membership card, and then 
sign the pledge in the Testament he re- 
ceived. 

A Rush For Testaments 

The eagerness of the men to make 
the promise and join the movement 
was astonishing. At one tent, when 
those who wished to become members 
were asked to come forward, the sol- 
diers literally stormed the platform in 
their eagerness to join. At another 
U;nt over 300 soldiers were enrolled in 



a few minutes. At still another there 
was not time to give out the Testa- 
ments that night, so the men were 
asked to present their membership 
cards, and secure the books at the 
marquee counter the next day. Early 
the following morning a stream of sol- 
diers asking for Testaments began, 
and continued until thousands of men 
had been enrolled in that marquee. 

A Remarkable Scene 

During the closing days of the meet- 
ings conducted by Mr. Alexander thrill- 
ing scenes were witnessed as the sol- 
diers were asked not only to join the 
League, but to yield their lives to God. 
One night over a thousand men were 
crowded into a tent. Over 300 joined 
the Pocket Testament League, and at 
the close of the service 192 soldiers 
in the presence of their comrades, 
rang out after song leader the words, 
"I accept Christ as my Saviour, my 
Lord and my King." The editor of a 
London journal who was present de- 
clared it was a sight he had rarely 
seen equalled. 

Bishop Taylor-Smith, the Chaplain 
General of the Forces, when asked for 
a word of encouragement to the men 
whose lives had been influenced, 
wrote: "My dear Mr. Alexander, I 
rejoice to hear of the blessing receiv- 
ed on the Plain. May you see greater 
things than these because of Christ's 
position and power. Give to the breth- 
ren from me Hebrews xiii:20, 21. Be- 
lieve me, yours always, J. Taylor- 
Smith, Bp. C. G." 

Later Dr. J. Wilbur Chapman arriv- 
ed in England from America, and he 
and Mr. Alexander conducted two 
brief but notable missions in London. 
At their conclusion, at the urgent re- 
quest of the National Council of the 
Y. M. C. A., the evangelists held three 
thrilling services for soldiers at the 
Crystal Palace and Wendover, when 
as the result of the inspiring messages 
in sermon and song hundreds of the 
troops stood up and openly confessed 
Christ as their Saviour. 

Bible Revival Spreads 

The Bible revival on Salisbury Plain 
did not end with the visit of Mr. Alex- 
ander and his party. The movement 
continued to spread among the men 
from tent to tent, and the demand for 
Testaments increased. 

Mr. Henry J. Lane, a business man 
who has worked day and night in one 
of the Y. M. C. A. marquees on the 
Plain as an honorary worker enroll- 
ing soldiers in the League, and leading 
them to a decision for God, sent to the 
League Headquarters in London a let- 
ter giving a graphic account of the 
Bible revival among the troops. He 
wrote : 

"After a visit from Mr. Alexander 
and his party, the Lord manifested His 
presence in a remarkable way. Until 
then there had been few decisions for 
Christ, sometimes one and never more 
than two a day. After the above men- 
tioned visit and the introduction of 
the Pocket Testament League, there 
came upon the soldiers a great desire 
to hear the Word of God. As it was 
told out men were gripped by the pow- 
er of the Holy Ghost and hour after 
hour they came to the counter and 
with bowed heads confessed Christ. On 
one occasion a group of 30 were lis- 
tening to the Gospel when the speak- 
er asked who would volunteer for the 
service of Christ. Immediately a non- 
commissioned officer, about six feet 
in height, who was on the outside, put 
up his hand and said: 'I will, sir,' at 
the same time pushing his way to the 
front. Within a few seconds 12 oth- 
ers joined him. No sooner had these 
been dealth with, and prayers offered, 
than another group came forward. 
Thus it continued until the 'last post' 
sounded and the soldiers hurried away 
to their lines." 

Moveme-nt Interests London Editors 

A few weeks later the Bible work 
among the soldiers had aroused such 



widespread interest that Mr. Lane and 
Mr. A. J. C. Thomas — who has witness- 
ed an almost equally wonderful work 
in a neighboring Y. M. C. A. marquee — 
were invited to London to tell about 
the spiritual movement among the 
troops. 

To a group of editors of London 
journals who had gathered to hear 
the story, Mr. Lane told how the work 
began, and of its remarkable influence 
on the morale of the troops. He said: 

"For weeks we have had a stream 
of men coming to join the Pocket Tes- 
tament League, and at the same time 
accepting Christ so rapidly, that 
could not deal with them in ones or 
twos, but I had groups of eight and 
ten and more. This has been done in 
the tent while the latest comic song 
was being sung. These men listened 
as intently as if there was no other 
sound or voice to be heard. 

"A merchant of Exeter was there in 
the marquee one day, also the Wes- 
leyan chaplain. They purposely stood 
at the back where I could not see 
them just to see what was taking 
place. The merchant said this: 'If I 
had read it in a book, or heard it 
from the lips of anyone, I would have 
discounted 50 per cent., and would not 
have believed the rest.' The chaplain 
said that he had never hoped to wit- 
ness such scenes or feel the power of 
God as he did then. Directly the lit- 
tle book was opened and the Word of 
God was read, the whole expression on 
the men's faces was changed, and they 
became deeply concerned, and the re- 
sult was that applications for the Tes- 
taments became so numerous that we 
could not supply them all. Men were 
bringing their chums all day in dozens. 
One man would get a Testament, and 
I said, 'Let the others know you have 
a good thing,' and the next day, time 
and again, the remaining number in 
that tent would come and join, and 
the demand was so great that at no 
time have we had sufficient Testa- 
ments, though I thank God we had a 
grand supply, but we have never had 
sufficient to meet the demand. The 
soul winning has coincided with the 
supply of Testaments. It is an extra- 
ordinary thing. I have tried to intro- 
duce another line of things, but that 
has failed. In no cases have we had 
any difficulty in leading souls to Christ 
from morning to night when we have 
had the League Testaments behind us. 

Swearing Changed to Bible Reading 

"An officer came in who was not a 
Christian man nor had he very much 
sympathy with Christian work. He 
said: 'What are you doing here? Ex- 
traordinary things are happening in 
the lines. Men who used to curse and 
swear, I hear reading and praying. 
What is it you have got?' We showed 
him the Testament; he did not take it, 
but still we had his testimony. One 
is struck by the fact that non-commis- 
sioned officers have been influenced by 
their men. One came to me and said, 
'When I came here the tent was a hell 
upon earth. Language was so dread- 
ful and behaviour so wretched that 
we could not get to sleep. When 
some of fchem came in we got out of 
their way. Everyone has joined the 
Pocket Testament League, and now 
there are hymns and Bible readings. 
The attitude of the rank and file has 
changed.' 

"A sergeant came to me and said: 
'I'll tell you what has brought me here. 
I have about the roughest section in 
our battalion, a tough lot of men. 
They have had to be carried from the 
canteens drunk and have given the 
non-commissioned officers untold troub- 
le. Now they have all joined the 
Pocket Testament League and they 
came to me this morning and said: 
"Sergeant, you see what we done, and 
isn't it time you did the same?" Well, 
I couldn't stand that, so before I went 
to drill I had to come here.' He ac- 
cepted Christ. 



Recruiting for Christ 

■ "Some of these men have done a 
thing that some of us would hesitate 
about doing. They have gone straight 
back to their ungodly campanions and 
have besought them to turn from their 
evil ways and come down and get a 
Testament and start right; and in tent 
after tent all the men take it in turns 
to read a portion every day, and some- 
times they sing a hymn. I have had 
three or four of these men bring a 
chum up to the counter and they are 
asked if they have given their hearts 
to the Lord. Then they stand with 
bowed heads while I offer a prayer so 
that every one within the sound of 
my voice knows what is going on. I 
have seen a group of men who were 
at first disinterested become attracted 
by the sound of praying. When the 
first group have been attended to 
there is another waiting. This has 
gone on until one has been absolutely 
exhausted in pointing men to Christ. 
It is such a blessed thing. What is 
being done in these two marquees can 
be done in every marquee in this 
country by the agency of the Pocket 
Testament League. I want to thank 
God for the Pocket Testament League. 
This was His purpose and way of work- 
ing. I would not be true to our God 
and Father if I did not say that the 
Pocket Testament League in His 
Hands has already brought 1,200 men 
to Christ and 4,200 to promise to read 
a portion of God's word every day. 

To Evangelize the British Army 

"Last Saturday there was a line 
waiting just like a theatre. They wait- 
ed patiently for their turn to come to 
yield themselves to Christ. I was 
forced to adopt the plan of dealing 
with them in groups, but the work 
amongst these men has just ebbed 
and flowed with the supply of Testa- 
ments. I have never dreamed of see- 
ing such marvellous things in my life. 
I believe that the Pocket Testament 
League work would evangelise the 
British army both at the front and at 
home if men would go out trusting 
God to use it." 

Mr. Thomas, in describing his work 
told how he takes the soldiers who 
apply for Testament into a quiet cor- 
ner of the tent, one or two at a time. 
They sit down at a table and sign 
their names in the Testament agreeing 
to join the League. Then he shows 
them how to become a Christian, has 
prayer with them, and sends them out 
openly to confess Christ. In a few 
weeks he and his workers have en- 
rolled over 1,400 men in the Pocket 
Testament League, and over 600 sol- 
diers have yielded their lives to God. 
Mr. Thomas verified Mr. Lane's state- 
ment that the tide of revival ebbed 
and flowed with the supply of Testa- 
ments. 

If this story interests you pray that 
the Bible revival may continue to 
grow and increase among the soldiers 
on Salisbury Plain, and that it may 
spread throughout the British army 
and navy. 



FREE — "SIMPLE PLANTINGS FOR 
SOUTHERN HOMES" 

This beautiful book will give you 
many good ideas on arrangement of 
trees, plants, shrubbery, vines, etc., 
around the home. A number of sim- 
ple plans that have been used with 
great success by Southern home own- 
ers are fully described and illustrated 
with photographs. This book tells 
what plants to set out and where to 
put them, and outlines the fundamen- 
tal principles of landscape gardening. 
It shows how you can increase the 
beauty of your ,place a hundred per 
cent, by a little judicious planting. The 
book has just been published by the 
J. Van Lindley Nursery Co., Box 203, 
Pomona, N. C. Write them today for 
a free copy. Ask also for their cata- 
logue, which contains full information 
on the care of trees and plants of all 
kinds. 



January 14, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Eleven 



*: Our Dead | 
+ * 

HENSLEY — Miss Nora H. Hensley 
was born Nov. 8, 1888, and died in 
Chestnut Hill Hospital, Philadelphia, 
Pa., Dec. 31, 1914, her age being 26 
years, 1 month and 23 days. Miss 
Hensley was the daughter of C. A. 
and Myra Alice Hensley. In early 
childhood she was converted and unit- 
ed with the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, at Nebo, North Caro- 
lina, and was during her life a most 
devoted member of ber church. For 
several years she was a trained nurse 
in Philadelphia, making her home with 
her unccle, F. B. Hensley, of 418 Maw- 
heim St., who accompanied her re- 
mains to Nebo, N. C, wbere she was 
laid to rest Jan. 1, 1915. 

For some time Miss Hensley had 
been a constant sufferer from turber- 
culosis, but through all her illness she 
bore up well and was ever patient and 
cheerful to the end, her last words be- 
ing: "Yea, though I walk through the 
valley and shadow of death, I will 
fear no evil, for Thou are with me 
Thy rod and Thy staff they comfort 
me." 

Our heartful sympathy goes out to 
the bereaved ones, especially to the 
father who has laid away a wife and 
four daughters. 

May God's richest blessings com- 
fort those who mourn their loss. 

M. W. Mann, P. C. 



HENSLEY— On Dec. 31, 1914, Miss 
Nora Hensley, daughter of C. A. Hens- 
ley, of McDowell County, N. C, died 
in Philadelphia, Pa., and was brought 
by her uncle, Fred Hensley, of said 
city and State, to Nebo, N. C, and 
laid to rest in the grave yard at Nebo 
M. E. C, South. Services were con- 
ducted by the pastor, Rev. Mr. Mann. 

Nora was good woman. Her uncle 
says that she was perfectly resigned 
and willing to go. 

"Blessed are the dead who die in 
the Lord." 

By her uncle, 

W. G. Hunter. 



COLE — William Webster Cole was 
born in Moore County, N. C, July 3rd, 
1856, and departed this life Dec. 20, 
1914, age 58 years, five months, and 17 
days. He was a son of Jas. M. and 
Mary Tillman Cole, of Moore County, 
N. C. 

On August 22, 1877, he was united in 
wedlock to Miss Elvira A. Buroughs. 
They were most congenial and faith- 
ful companions until his decease. Be- 
sides his good wife he leaves two 
brothers, a number of more distant 
relatives and a host of friends who 
must bear great loss for a season; 
yes, just for a while. 

Brother Cole was for many years a 
most devoted and loyal member of the 
Methodist Church and as Sunday 
school superintendent, chairman of the 
Board of Stewards, Sunday school 
teacher and private member he faith- 
fully and joyfully performed his task, 
and counted it a joy to do his Mas- 
ter's will until He called him home. 
He was faithful unto the end. Even 
when unable to walk to church he 
went supported by the arm of his faith- 
ful wife. 

Brother Cole was an example to 
the believers in every Christian walk, 
especially in his liberality. He was a 
strict tither, so if he only made $1.00 
a day or in a week he put one-tenth 
in God's Church. Rev. J. A. Baldwin, 
once his pastor, tells of an act sig- 
nificant and beautiful in his life. Dur- 
ing the famine in India some years 
ago, Brother Cole came to him with 
$25.00 for India. His pastor remarked, j 
"Brother Cole, that is too much for j 
you." "Well," said the good man, "I 
have it and I want to send it." And so 



he did. He was not rich in material 
J tilings, but full of faith and good 
works, rich toward God. During his 
last illness, he said to his pastor, as 
he read a placard on the wall of his 
bedroom: "There is my motto, 'Kept 
by the power of God through faith 
unto salvation.' " His pastor, 

J. O. Ervin. 



DR. J. T. JOHNSON 

Whereas God in His infinite wisdom 
has taken from us our brother, Dr. J. 
T. Johnson, a former Chairman of this 
Board; and 

Whereas we the Board of Stewards 
of the First Methodist Church, Hick- 
ory, N. C, desire to record our appre 
ciation of his long and efficient serv- 
ice as a member of this Board, there- 
fore, be it 

Resolved, That in the death of Dr. 
Johnson we realize that the Church 
not only lost its oldest member but 
one whose devotion to its every inter- 
est has been a great factor in its up- 
building under the providence of God. 

That we extend to the family our 
deepest sympathy and commend them 
for comfort to the God whom he so 
long and faithfully served. 

W. H. Nicholson, Chairman. 
W. A. Rudasill, Secretary. 



\ GREAT OPPORTUNITY AND A 
WEIGHTY OBLIGATION. WHAT 
WILL WE DO WITH IT? 

By Bishop Warren A. Candler, D. D. 

The greatest war recorded in history 
is now raging in Europe, and what- 
ever may be its issue, the world will 
be all changed at its close. If Ger- 
many should be victorious, moral con- 
sequences will follow which will affect 
the destiny of mankind; and if Eng- 
land and the allies should triumph the 
results can not be less enduring and 
far-reaching. In any event the wel- 
fare of the race is involved. 

The part the United States must 
bear in the future work of the world 
must henceforth be greater than ever, 
and especially in the missionary and 
educational enterprises, whereby the 
race of man must be evangelized and 
enlightened. 

The missionary responsibility for 
the world must rest upon our people 
more heavily than ever. The Nations, 
of Continental Europe have not bourne 
any great part in the work of mod- 
ern missions to the heathen world. 
Germany, which has done more than 
all the rest, has fallen behind the 
missionary efforts of Great Britain 
and the United States. The English- 
speaking Nations have for the last 
hundred years been the evangelical 
and evangelistic powers of the world. 
But the war is wasting the resources 
of Great Britain, and the Churches in 
the United States must increase their 
offerings and intensify their zeal to 
make up for the loss which the mis- 
sionary cause must sustain on ac- 
count of the diminished power of the 
Churches of Great Britain to serve it. 
Hence our missionary obligation is 
loubled, and it must be met, bow- 
ever hard the times may be. The 
work of missions in pagan lands must 
not suffer. It were better to deny 
ourselves some of the necessaries of 
life, to say nothing of luxuries, than 
f hat Christian Churches in pagan 
lands should suffer want. Our peo- 
ple are more able than any other peo- 
ple in the world to bear this burden 
at this time. Our harvests have been 
plentiful and our barns are filled to 
overflowing. God has blessed us with 
peace and penty in order that we 
may bless the world in this hour of 
its sore need. 

In like manner we have an increas- 
ed educational abligation. The Ger- 
man and Belgian universities a T e 
closed. The British universities are 
suffering very much. The French 
schools have not yet recovered from j 
the war of 1870, and now they sus- 1 
tain further impairment. It is evi- 



dent that the educational center of 
the world must henceforth be in the 
United States. What is our duty in 
view of this undeniable fact? 

1. The colleges and universities of 
the Churches must be made far 
stronger than they have ever been ; 
and for the increased resources which 
they require they must look to the 
Churches alone. It would be worse 
than idle to look to secular sources 
to meet these needs — it would be 
positively disgraceful and injurious. 

It must be frankly confessed that 
the richest institutions in America 
are not evangelical in spirit — they are 
scarecly Christian in character. From 
the beginning of the alienation of 
Harvard College from the Church, a 
century ago, there has been a steady 
movement in the direction of alien- 
ating the strongest instituions from 
the Churches. Secularists, by their 
gifts, have promoted this process of 
alienation. There are forces now at 
work which are aimed at accelerating 
this denaturing process by dominat- 
ing the stronger schools through do- 
nations and destroying the weaker 
institutions by over-mastering com- 
petition. 

The Churches i must meet this move- 
ment by enriching their own insti- 
tutions and making them as strong as 
the strongest of the secular, institu- 
tions. They are well able to do this, 
and the Christianity of our own and 
other lands must suffer if it is not 
done speedily. 

It is not altogether a misfortune to 
mankind that the German universi- 
ties are closed. Those institutions 
have propagated a rationalistic type 
of religion far too long for the good 
of the race. But if, with the shift- 
ing of the educational center of the 
world from Europe to America, the 
propagation of the same sort of ra- 
tionalism is" continued, what will be 
the profit? What man or nation ever 
increased the sum of human good by 
"swapping the devil for a witch?" 

If Chinese and Japanese students 
are corrupted by the rationalism of 
Harvard and the materialism of Chi- 
cago, how much better will be their 
case than it would have been if they 
had suffered the same injury at Ber- 
lin or Heidleberg? 

In this connection let it be remark- 
ed that thousands of students from 
pagan lands are now in American in- 
stitutions of learning, and that most 
of them are in institutions, the at- 
mosphere of which is distinctly un- 
friendly to evangelical Christianity. 
When they have returned to their 
own lands they will be obstacles in 
the way of our missionaries. The 
power of our investments in missions 
will be greatly reduced unless more 
of these foreign students are drawn 
into evangelical institutions, and this 
can not be done if the colleges and 
universities of the evangelical Church- 
es are not speedily made as strong 
as the strongest of secular institu- 
tions. 

2. The colleges and universities 
of the Churches must be held firmly 
to the evangelical principles and pur- 
poses for which they were founded. 
Institutions of learning are as prone 
to backslide as are individuals; and 
the schools of the Churches must be 
jealously guarded against false teach- 
ings and worldly tendencies. This 
can not be done in institutions which \ 
are not owned and controlled by the , 
Churches. 

Some talk of the Churchces doing a ; 
work of "co-operation" rather than ' 
of "operation" in schools and colleges, j 
This is something worse than non- 
serse. Tt is really a proposi.l of edu- 
ral;' hal simony. Men who talk this 
s'eary stuff wish to get the patvorn---; 
of the Ch'irch without being s'ib. 1 '? t 
to its authority. They wish to 
the Church rather than serve it. They 
desire to get its money and its stu- 
dents while resenting its government 



and repudiating its teachings. 

Why do not these advocates of "co- 
operation" versus "operation" apply 
their doctrine to the universities of 
the States? Will they dare to say a 
States should not own and control the 
university which receives annual ap- 
propriations from its treasury? Will 
they insist that an American com- 
monwealth may "co-operate" with an 
institution of learning, but not "oper- 
ate" it, although it taxes the people 
for money to support such a school 
and grants to it the power to confer 
degrees? 

It is clear that these doctrinaires of 
"co-operation" are at heart opposed 
to an institution of learning being 
genuinely Christian in character. 
They are willing for any secular au- 
thority, whether it be a State or a 
self - perpetuating board of trustees, 
to own and control a college or uni- 
versity; but they are unwilling for 
any Church except the Roman Catho- 
lic to do so. Their motive is as mani- 
fest as it is unworthy. 

It is impossible to have institutions 
that will serve the ends of evangeli- 
cal Christianity unless the Churches 
erect, endow, own and control such 
institutions. SUtes can not make such 
institutions and irresponsible boards 
(miscalled independent) will not. 
Only the Churches can and will. 

In this matter Southern Churches 
have peculiar obligations. The South 
is pre-eminently the home of evan- 
gelical Christianity. The degenerate 
forms of rationalistic religion have 
never been able to take root and 
flourish in our section. Southern 
Churches, therefore, can make evan- 
gelical institutions of learning more 
easily than can the Churches of other 
sections. The Southern atmosphere is 
friendly to the growth of such es- 
tablishments. 

And the Methodist Episcopal Church 
South, ought to take the lead in this 
high matter. Our numbers, resources 
and prestige enable us to do it. We 
may do a work in our colleges and 
universities now which will promote 
evangelical Christianity to the ends 
of the eath. 

In Latin-America especially we may 
do a great work. If> we will make 
our two universities, one at Dallas, 
Texas, and the other at Aalanta, Ga., 
what they ought to be, and what we are 
able to make them, we may propa- 
gate Methodism throughout all the 
countries south of us. Students from 
Mexico, Central America, the West In- 
dies and the Northern parts of South 
America would prefer to attend uni- 
versities in the mild climate of the 
South than institutions in the colder 
regions of the North, provided they 
can find equal advantages in our sec- 
tion. Herein is a great missionary op- 
portunity and obligation. What will 
wo do with it? 

There is much talk of the securing to 
our country the trade of Latin-Ameri- 
ca, and that is a most important 
matter. But it is far more important 
to become the educator of Latin- 
America. The North American and 
South American Continents can not be 
bound together firmly by ties of com- 
merce alone. They will become fast 
friends when they think and feel 
alike. Our two Methodist Universi- 
ties, if they are richly endowed and 
adequately equipped, will serve this 
end more effectually than all the con- 
suls and commercial agents who have 
been or can be engaged to accomplish 
it. In this matter our commercial 
interest and our religious duty coin- 
cide. 

Atlanta, Ga. 

^each and Apple 
Trees 2c and up 

Pear, Cherry, Plum, Grapes, Strawber- 
ry, etc. Catalog Free. TENN. NUR- 
SERY CO., Box 60, Cleveland, Tenn. 



Page Twelve 



NOETH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 14, 191 



The Sunday School Lesson 



LESSON III— JANUARY 17 

THE CALL OF GIDEON 

Judges 6. 11-40; (Memorize verses 
14-16) 



Golden Text — Blessed is the man 
whom thou choosest. Psa. 65. 4. 



Notes by Dr. and Mrs. Camden M. 
Cobern. Old Testament versus 
New Testament Records 

The text of the New Testament is 
fixed more certainly than that of any 
other ancient book. Some of the new 
MSS. were written by copyists who 
were nearer to St. John than we are 
to Shakespeare or to John Alden, 
whose old Bible may now be examin- 
ed at Plymouth. But this is not true 
of the Old Testament. Our oldest 
Hebrew MSS. are only a thousand 
years old, and while we have ancient 
versions, one of which reaches back 
to about 200 B. C, we can never be 
as certain of the exact text as in the 
case of the New Testament. Neither 
were the historians who tried to tell 
the story of their national life, 1000 — 
600 years B. C, as good at that work 
as the New Testament historians. 
While these ancient writers have 
been proved by modern discoveries 
to be more accurate and reliable 
than any contemporary historians, 
yet the ancient rules of history- 
writing and the methods of using 
preexisting materials, and the hom- 
iletic purpose which governed the 
choice of materials, and the Orien- 
tal indifference to minutiae in re- 
porting events, as well as the picto- 
rial nature of the languages used and 
the universal custom of picturing na- 
tional or tribal movements by some 
individual whose life was considered 
typical of others — all these and many 
other considerations make it very dil- 
ficult to be certain of dates, events 
and the succession of events as these 
are stated in the Old Testament re- 
cords. This is the reason we find dif- 
ferent scholars giving a different ex- 
planation of these primitive docu- 
ments, which have fortunately been 
preserved to us from the libraries of 
the kings of Israel and Judah, and 
were edited with noble devotion by 
the prophets. 

Old Testament versus New Testament 
Heroes 

One of the things for which we 
should be most grateful is the fact 
that God has actually succeeded in 
bringing the race from century to 
century up to higher ideals. To start 
with, the Hebrew people were no bet- 
ter than other races or tribes; but 
because they listened to the in- 
ward voice of the soul, and were 
willing to be taught by men of the 
Spirit, they gradually advanced to a 
place where they were fitted to give 
to the world the perfect expression of 
the principles of morality and relig- 
ion, as the Greeks gave to the world 
the perfect expression of the princi- 
ples of beauty. The story of this 
advance from the low ideals common 
to the race, to the higher ideals grasp- 
ed and announced from time to time 
by prophets of God— that is the story 
of the Old Testament. Even good 
men are not unaffected by the ideals 
of the age in which they live. If the 
ideals of the Old Testament had been 
perfect there would have been no 
need for a New Testament to take its 
place. The "Law of Moses" was the 
best expression of the highest relig- 
ious ideal and hope which the world 
up to that time had been able to 
grasp; but the Golden Rule and the 
Sermon on the Mount were infinitely 
! -rher. The later ideal of love could 
not be presented until men had learn- 



ed the earlier law of justice and 
equity. So we find that the heroes of 
the earlier periods are very different 
from the heroes of the era of tine 
prophets or apostles. Barak and Gid- 
eon and Samson are ignoble and bar- 
barous men compared with Isaiah or 
Jeremiah or St. John. But in their 
day and generation they were "lead- 
ers," and in some special way, nar- 
rated in the Bible, they helped the 
nation to an advanced plane. Low as 
their ideals were in some respects, 
they were higher than those of other 
men living at the same period. 

The Times of the Judges 

Joshua and the united tribes had 
not conquered much of Canaan before 
the tribes began to disintegrate. Some 
of these tribes or clans conquered 
certain districts and settled down 
there to live, mixing, too, with the 
Canaanites. Some tribes were defeat- 
ed in their attempt to seize and hold 
the territory that had been given to 
them to conquer, and these were put 
into slavery. Some tribes almost dis- 
appeared altogether. Out of these 
centuries between the migration of Is- 
rael to Canaan and its final conquest 
by them lie these unsatisfactory and 
obscure campaigns by which differ- 
ent sections of the Hebrews in dif- 
ferent parts of Canaan attempted to 
make themselves dominant. The acts 
of these times "can not bear to be 
tried by the standard of an enlighten 
ed humanity, or the ideal of evangel- 
ical Christianity" (Konig). We shud 
der at the cutting off of thumbs and 
great toes (Judges 1:6), and the sac- 
rifice of a daughter by one of these 
judges as a burnt-offering to God be- 
cause of a victory (1:31), and almost 
equally at their reverence for "eph- 
ods" (8:27), and their superstitious 
belief that the test of a man's good- 
ness or a nation's piety was to be 
found in martial or financial success 
(6:13). But it must be remembe 
that even the Athenians treated pris- 
oners in exactly the same way, that 
some modern "Christians" reverence 
the crucifix in an equally supersti- 
tious way, and that even now the He- 
brew idea that the nation whose God 
is the Lord is bound to prosper is 
a philosophical judgment which, on 
the whole, has been confirmed by his- 
tory. The Hebrews were the first 
nation to get this religious view of 
history. During the period of the 
Judges the nation was working out 
this faith in God as a moral deity who 
controlled even in politics. It was a 
critical time of spiritual self-assert- 
ion and struggle of ideas against the 
Canaanites (D. B. 2. 820), during 
which they resisted the strongest 
possible temptation to lose all their 
unique moral ideas. 

Gideon, the Farmer-Warrior 

This Hebrew Cincinnatus was brave, 
prudent, practical, modest, indepen- 
dent, religious, energetic and prompt- 
ly obedient. He was "called" while 
doing humble work in a stalwart way; 
yet in a hidden spot ("Wine-press") 
where he would not be exposed to the 
enemy. Health and strength and re- 
ligious training were already his; but 
he needed to meet God in order to be- 
come a leader. He was superstitious, 
for he wanted a miracle in order to 
know God was behind his "call" — not 
realizing that the "natural" is as di- 
vine as the "supernatural" — and he 
was ignorant, for he thought that God 
had forsaken Israel, merely because 
their army had not been victorious. 
But he was willing to be led. God 
did not think it worth while to cor- 
rect his false philosophy of history 
and false views of miracles. False 



intellectual positions are not often ru- 
inous, if the heart is right. He put 
Gideon to work. He built u,p his faith. 
He gave him something to do which 
took courage and practical wit and 
energy, and put him in a position of 
mastery (6:25-37). The best cure for 
doubt or disbelief is to act up to all 
that one does believe in a positive, 
public, independent way. Then he 
"blew the trumpet," which was the 
call for battle (6:34); and when only 
his own father's household respond- 
ed (verse 34), he proved his fitness 
(Joshua 6:20) for leadership by en- 
thusing these few and sending them 
out after the other neighbors in the 
same tribe (verse 35), and when these 
did thier work well, he sent out the 
new recruits after other tribes (verse 
35). 

Did God Interfere with Natural Law 
to Encourage Gideon? 
r t is more likely that he used natural 
law. The law of the natural is as 
divine as the law of the miraculous. 
God is equally behind both. But God 
does not ask the impossible. He took 
Gideon on the plane of civilization 
where he found him. Even the super- 
stitious man can get to God. The 
early Christians, as we now know, 
were tiny copies of the New Testa- 
ment as charms around their necks, 
and the early Methodists, like Gideon, 
believed in casting lots and in super- 
natural tokens — -but, while this is bad 
enough, it is not half so bad as to fail 
to open the Bible in a time of busi- 
ness or social emergency, or to doubt 
whether God can be present in natural 
law, and in so-called matters of 
"chance." — Pittsburgh Christian Advo- 
cate. 



BIBLE LOVERS AND CHRISTIAN 
WORKERS 

Will be interested in the six weeks' 
course to be given at the Methodist 
Training School, February 4th to 
March 20th, 1915. 

Object: To present principles and 
methods of study in Bible, Missions, 
Sociology, Sunday school and League 
work, story telling and practical serv- 
ice. 

For Whom: For all Bible students 
and Christian workers who feel that 
they cannot take a full course but 
who desire a short course for self- 
culture and increased efficiency. Pas- 
tors, Sunday school teachers, League 
officers, workers in Woman's Mission- 
ary societies will find the course very 
helpful. 

Special Lectures: On pertinent sub- 
jects will be delivered by men emi- 
nent in our church life. The great 
Bible Conference will bring to us dur- 
ing this period such leaders as Jowett, 
Coburn, S. D. Gordon and others. 

Cost: Thirty-six dollars will cover 
all the expense for board, laundry, 
lights and Bible Conference. 

Plan for it — Come. 

For further information address 
William F. Quillian, Methodist Train- 
ing School, Nashville, Tenn. 

RECIPE FOR GRAY HAIR 

To half pint of water add 1 oz. Bay 
Rum, a small box of Barbo Compound, 
and % oz. of glycerine. Apply to tne 
hair twice a week until it becomes the 
desired shade. Any druggist can put 
this up or you can mix it at home at 
very little cost. Full directions tor 
making and use come in each box of 
Barbo Compound. It will gradually 
darken streaked, faded gray hair, and 
removes dandruff, ft is excellent for 
(ailing hair and will make harsh hair 
soft and glossy. It will not color the 
scalp, is not sticky or greasy, and does 
not rub off. 



SAVE YOUR MEAT 
— From Skippers — ■ 

USE CHAMBERS ANTI-SKITPEH COHl'OUND 

One package is Guaranteed to keep skippers 
and other insects from Five Hundred Pounds 
of Cured Meat. Koops meatcloan find sweet. 
Price 50c. pur package, by mail, postpaid. 

c::A::s".?,5-coDm:Y mfg. co. w^t; n Tem. 



BEAUTIFUL 
FLORAL 
DESIGNS 

Furnished on short notice 




Summit Avenue Greenhouses 
HOWARD GARDNER 

Proprietor 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Office Phone 511 Res. Phone 1345 



DR. C. W. MOSELEY 

DISEASES OP 
STOMACH AND INTESTINES 



121% So. Elm St., Greensboro, N. C. 



The Newest Styles of Jewelr 

WATCHES, STERLING SILVER 
AND PLATE WARE 

Clocks that will run and a large assnr 
uent of Fine Pocket Books, Cut Glass 
ware and Ornaments. We are the oldei 
leading firm In the city. Everything guai 
anteed. 

SCHIFFMAN JEWELRY CO, 

LEADING JEWELERS 




8* 



v •'*>"•< 

it 

Km 



PAINT 
STRENGTH 

Strength is what 
paint is for. The 
stronger it is, the 
less gallons and 
money it takes, 
and the longer it 
wears. The strong- 
, est paint-word is . 
DEVOE. 

ODELL 

Hardware Co. 



r.Y ■' 

v: • 



January 14, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Thirteen 



Our Little Folks' Department | 



THE CZAR AND THE TAILOR 

An amusing account of the circum- 
stances that attended the ordering o£ 
a military uniform by the Czar ot 
Russia from a little Jewish tailor in 
the Crimea is given in the Argus. The 
Czar wished to wear the uniform oi 
the Crimean Dragoons at a fete, bu 
did not have one with him. He no 
ticed, however, that the colonel of the 
regiment wore a uniform that fitter 
beautifully, and learned that the name 
of his tailor was Khaim Kurichkess. 

'There was still time to have a uni- 
form made, and the Czar commanded 
that the tailor be brought to him, 
When a handsome motor car stopped 
outside the Kurichkess door, there was 
surprise and alarm in the houshold, 
which consisted of father and mother 
and nine children. A cloaked officer 
descended, and said in staccato sen- 
tences to the dumbfounded tailor: 

"You must come with me! Don't be 
frightened! You'll know later where 
I am taking you! You'll be away for 
several days! I can't leave without 
you; we've lost so much time already! 
Get dressed quickly!" 

Kurichkess obeyed. He was driven 
to a house where a general of gend- 
armerie, who showed a surprising 
knowledge of his antecedents, cross- 
examined him as to his identity. He 
was assured that he need not be alarm- 
ed; he would be provided with a lodg- 
ing, and the next day he would be told 
what he had to do. He must not try 
to escape, for he would.be watched. 

The following morning a colonel en- 
tered his room and addressed him 
thus: 

"Great good fortune has fallen upon 
you! His Majesty, the Emperor, wishes 
you to make for him a uniform of the 
Crimean Dragoons. I hope you won't 
make a mess of it. I will take you at 
once to the palace, where you will be 
admitted to the Czar's study to see His 
Majesty's figure." 

When the excited tailor was ushered 
into the royal study, the Czar looked 
up from a document he was reading, 
and said: 

"Oh, you are here already! You 
are Khaim Kurishkess, the tailor, I 
want you to make me a uniform of 
the Crimean Dragoons. Do your best, 
and see that it is a good fit." 

When his work was finished and the 
Czar was pleased with the fit, Kurich- 
kess refused to accept any thing in 
payment, but the colonel insisted that, 
according to law, he was obliged to re- 
ceive fifty rubles for his expenses. 
Moreover, the minister of the court 
was aware that Kurichkess was in 
debt, and had ordered the officer to 
give the tailor an envelope containing 
three hundred rubles. 

Kurichkess was driven home in a 
motor, and some days later an imperial 
messenger brought to his shop a case 
containing a gold watch and chain. 
The double eagle was engraved on the 
watch, which also bore the inscrip- 
tion, "To Khaim Kurichkess, for zeal." 
— Youth's Companion. 



WHEN ALICE WENT TO PRAYER 

MEETING 
I 

Alice thought her papa was the 
greatest person in the world. She 
found only one fault with him. He 
didn't stay at home enough. He left 
for his office so early that sometimes 
she did not even get to give him his 
good-morning kiss; and he came home 
so late some evenings that she barely 
had time to kiss him good night. 

One night as he started off to prayer 
meeting Alice clung about his neck and 
begged him so hard not to go that he 
laughed and said: "Ask mamma if 
you may go with me." 

Mamma said: "O, my baby would 



go to sleep!" 

And papa answered: "What if she 
does? The cushions are soft, and she 
ivould be very comfortable." 

So mother got her little cloak and 
hat, and she trudged off very happily 
by the side of her big, handsome 
father. 

What a lovely walk that was! Papa 
calked to her about the stars and the 
;ood Heavenly Father, who holds each 
one in its place. When they reached 
the church door, she pressed her fath- 
er's hand and whispered: "I'm so 
glad you brought me. I'm not going 
to sleep; I'm just as wide awake!" 

How bright the lights were! And 
how sweet the singing! They sang 
"What a Friend We Have in Jesus!" 
and "Revive Us Again." Alice knew 
both of these, and several people turn- 
ed to smile at the sound of the sweet, 
childish voice. 

The pastor asked some one to select 
the next song, and Alice said: "The 
Way of the Cross Leads Home." Every- 
body sang, and somehow the music 
sounded unusually sweet. 

Alice kept awake through the next 
prayer; but when Brother Lane began 
to talk she could not stay awake anoth- 
er minute, though he was telling a 
beautiful story of the Good Shepherd, 
who loves his sheep and knows them 
all by name. Papa laid her down on 
the cushion and covered her with her 
little cloak. 

After the service the members of the 
board of trustees were asked to stay 
for a few minutes' conference, and 
Alice's father picked up his hat and 
went to join them. When the business 
was over, the men all walked off to- 
gether, and the janitor put out the 
lights and went home. 

When Mr. Pace entered the bright- 
ly lighted library, his wife asked: 
"Where's Alice?" 

He paused a minutes in surprise 
and then started off in a run toward 
the church. 

Poor little Alice, all alone in that 
big, dark church! When he reached 
the door, he found it locked; but the 
preacher had a key to his office, and 
he went with Mr. Pace into the church. 
He reached up his hand to turn on the 
light, but Mr. Pace stopped him for 
fear the sudden light might waken his 
little girl and frighten her before he 
could reach her. He felt his way in 
the dark and lifted the sleeping figure. 

She did not wake at all; and when 
mamma had undressed her and put her 
in her own little bed, she smiled and 
murmured in her sleep : "I like prayer 
meeting, and the stars, and the Good 
Shepherd, and 'The Way of the Cross 
Leads Home.' " — Mrs. A. F. Watkins. 



There is only one sure way of mak- 
ing a thing come right, boys and girls: 
by starting right, by keeping right, and 
by making sure that the thing itself is 
right all through. Then you are on the 
way to true success/ — Jewels. 



WHEN BARBARA WALKED TO THE 
PARTY 

The telephone rang while Barbara 
was wiping the dinner dishes. Noon 
is dinner time in the country, and elev- 
en-year-old Barbara lived in the coun- 
try. The little girl hoped that mother 
or grandmother would hear the tele- 
phone and answer it, because she was 
in a great hurry and did not like to 
leave her work. 

A mile away Barbara's young cousin 
Maud was probably getting her dinner 
dishes washed and put away as rapidly 
as possible, that she might be ready to 
receive her guests. Maud gave a par- 
ty that afternon. Her father was a 
farmer too. 



The telephone rang again. This time 
Barbara answered it. "Yes, this is 
Barbara," she said; and after an inter- 
val of silence, "All right;" and after 
another interval of silence, "All right" 
and "Good-by." 

"What is all right?" asked grandma, 
just then entering the room. 

"Nothing is all right," was Barbara's 
reply. "It's all wrong. L shall have to 
walk alone all that long, dusty mile to 
Maud's house." 

"What is the matter with Helen?" 

"O, Helen says that she has a chance 
to ride in an automobile. Her uncle is 
at their house with his family, on their 
way to somewhere, and her aunt says 
that Helen can sit on her lap and be 
there in three minutes, all rested and 
fresh." 

"I am glad you did not object," said 
grandma. 

"But I really do object," continued 
Barbara. "I don't want to go alone. 
It is fun when you have some one to 
talk and laugh with; but to go poking 
along alone on a gray day like this — 
I wouldn't have played such a trick on 
Helen; I know that." 

By the time Barbara was dressed for 
the party she was hap,py and good-na- 
tured, thanks to wise and cheerful 
counsel. She even waved her hand 
and smiled when passing Helen's home 
before whose gate waited Uncle Tom's 
touring car. 

Slowly Barbara walked on. She had 
promised to think happy thoughts and 
take her time. As if determined to 
help make the journey pleasant, the 
sun came out from behind a cloud and 
shone brightly until the little girl 
reached her cousin's house. 

"Why, where is Helen?" inquired 
Maud. 

"Coming in her Uncle Tom's auto,' 
was Barbara's brief account of her 
nearest and dearest neighbor. 

"We are going to have pink ice 
cream," was Maud's next remark. "And 
do come and see the decorations! Our 
house smells like a rose garden. We 
have picked bushels of pink roses; and 
I am glad you are the first to get here, 
because I want to show you how beau- 
tiful the rooms look. I am so glad you 
got here early. I like Helen, of course; 
but she isn't my own cousin, and she 
might think I am bragging. But hon- 
estly, Barbara, our pink and green dec- 
oratoins are beautiful, and we are go- 
ing to have a story-teller from the city. 
My sakes, Barbara, suppose you had 
the whooping cough or something and 
couldn't have come!" 

The girls laughed merrily at so ab- 
surd suggestion and were soon busy re- 
ceiving guests. When every little girl 
who had been invited to the party ex- 
cept Helen arrived and had begun play- 
ing games, Barbara wondered anxious- 
ly why her particular friend failed to 
appear. 

"Let's telephone to her home," sug- 
gested Maud. "I wouldn't have her 
miss the story-telling for anything." 

Just at that moment in came the lit- 
tle girl, flushed and breathless. 

"Why, what is the trouble?" inquired 
Barbara, running to meet her. "Your 
face is as red as a — as a firecracker." 

"I feel about like a firecracker, if 
they feel as they act," confessed Helen 
with a good-natured laugh. "I thought 
I'd never get here. I think I must have 
run half a mile without stopping. Am 
I late for everything, Maud?" 

"Why, no; the rest of the girls 
haven't been here more than half an 
hour. What kept you?" 

"Punctured tire, and something hap- 
pened to the engine. Uncle Tom's 
watch had stopped, so we did not know 
what time it was; and after it seemed 
to me we had waited two hours, any- 
way, I thought I'd walk the rest of the 
way. It isn't. much fun to walk alone, 
either. I" — 

Just then Helen remembered some- 
thing that made her flushed face 
brighter stilL 



"It is fun after you get here, 
though," added Barbara quickly; "and 
I don't care if I am talking about my 
own cousin, which is about the same 
thing as praising yourself, this is the 
most beautiful party I ever went to. 
Come in and see the roses." 

At home-going time Uncle Tom call- 
ed for Helen. "We are on our way 
home again ourselves," he explained, 
"and Aunt Carolyn says she will hold 
you on her lap, Helen, and this time 
we promise not to have a breakdown." 

"I thank you, Uncle Tome," Helen 
answered most politely, "but I would 
rather walk home with Barbara. It 
is lovely now, and we have a great 
deal to talk about." — Frances M. Fox. 



WHO WAKED HAROLD? 

"You needn't get up for breakfast 
in the morning, Harold," said Aunt 
Agnes as she tucked Harold in and 
kissed him good night. 

"But I want to get up early, early," 
said Harold, "and see the farm and 
the pigs and the chickens and things." 

Aunt Agnes laughed. "But you'll be 
sleepy after your long trip, and the 
farm will keep till another day." 

Harold said nothing, but hoped that 
some one would wake him up early 
the next morning. It was so stupid 
getting up late and eating your break- 
fast all alone. For a minute he 
thought perhaps he wouldn't go to 
sleep at all. He felt so strange and 
far away and all alone out in the coun- 
try, away from all his family. He was 
sleeping outside on a wide porch, 
where the branches of great trees 
leaned over and almost touched him, 
and the stars peeped through the tree 
tops and winked their bright, shining 
eyes at him. These thoughts didn't 
last long, though, and he fell asleep 
beore he was half through thinking 
and long before he had thought of any 
plan to wake himself in the morning. 

Pretty soon he was dreaming that 
he was riding on the train again, and 
the dream was so real that he could 
almost hear the great engine puffiing 
and the wheels of the cars whirring 
as they flew around and around on 
the smooth steel rails. Then he 
dreamed that the train had changed 
into a boat with a great wheel at the 
back that buzzed and splashed the wa- 
ter as it turned. He was busy watch- 
ing it in his dreams when all at once 
it changed to a big black automobile 
exactly like his father's, and he was 
riding in it with his father and mother 
and his little sister and baby broth- 
er. That was a good dream, and he 
was enjoying it like everything. The 
chug-chug and whir of the engine 
and the wheels was almost like music 
to him, and he was about to fall deep- 
er and deeper asleep and quit dream- 
ing at all when suddenly the big au- 
tomobile changed to an airship, and 
then instead of falling deeper asleep 
he was about to wake up and see how 
things looked down below where the 
world was. The airship made such a 
lot of noise that even a healthy boy 
like Harold couldn't sleep very sound- 
ly. He turned over in bed and open- 
ed his eyes wide, and instead of be- 
ing in an airship he was right in his 
own bed on the wide front porch at 
Aunt Agnes's house. The sun was just 
peeping up over the blue mountain 
tops, and it was quite light; and there, 
almost at the head of his bed, whirr- 
ing and buzzing, with its shining green- 
and-gold wings spread out in the light 
and its tiny body poised in the air 
rigt over the open blue cup of a beau- 
tiful morning-glory that grew up on 
the porch, was a beautiful little hum- 
ming bird, getting its breakfast of hon- 
ey out of the flower cups. And Har- 
old had dreamed it was an airship? 
The little boy got ready for breakfast 
on time and Aunt Agnes laughed when 
he told her of the wonderful airship 
that waked him. — Francis McKinnon 
Morton. 



Page Fourteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 14, 1915 



4. v 
-Our Children's Home t 

a . Conducted by Walter Thompson, Supt. X 

The donations sent by Mooresville 
were credited in last week's Advocate 
to the saints of another field. Be it 
known that it was Mooresville send 
ing such liberal gifts during the 
Christmas season. 



Hon. C. B. Watson sent us two tur- 
keys the past Christmas a year. 
We had enough and kept his with one 
or two others and raised enough foi 
the past Thanksgiving. Mr. Watson 
sent us another turkey. We did no. 
eat it, because this time we had onlj 
one to go with it. We shall keep this 
one over for another year and try tc 
raise another bunch from it and one 
or two others. 



Don't forget January 31 is the 5th 
Sunday. The 5th sunday in Novem- 
ber was a bad Sunday and the returns 
were less than usual. 



BUILDING FUND 

A Friend, Salisbury, N. C, $1.00; A 
Friend, Salisbury, N. C, $1.00. Total, 
$2.00. 



FIFTH SUNDAY COLLECTIONS 

Burkhead M. E. S. S., Winston, J. A. 
Magee, $4.61; Bethel S. S., Asheville, 
C. R. Perry, $1.64; Bbenezer S. S., High- 
Point, J. E. Taylor, 65c; Bethlehem 
S. S., Reidsville, Miss Lottie Burton, 
$2.50; Taylorsville S. S., Alexander Ct, 
Taylorsville, R. L. Snow, $6.27; Hick- 
ory S. S., Hickory, G. F. Ivey, $11.51. 
Total, $27.18. \ 



RECEIVED ON SPECIAL, GENERAL 
AND TEN PER CENT. COL- 
LECTIONS 

Davidson Church, Davidson, D. F. 
Carver, $6.00; Biltmore Methodist 
Church, Biltmore, Miss Julia Brook- 
shire, $8.67; W. H. M. Society, Bilt- 
more, Mrs. D. K. Lipe, $1.50; C. M. 
Edwards, High Point, $15.00; Friends 
in Winston, $28.75; Triplett, Moores- 
ville, J. T. Ratledge, $3.50; Centenary 
Church, Mooresville, J. T. Ratledge, 
$1.15; McKendree, Mooresville, J. T. 
Ratledge, 65c; Williamsons, Moores- 
ville, J. T. Ratledge, $1.70; Epworth 
Church, Concord, A. S. Raper, $3.85; 
McAdenville Church, McAdenville, Rev. 
Dwight W. Brown, $1.60; Creston 
Creston, W. P. Moody, $2.00; Creston 
Charge, Creston, W. H. Worth, $1.00; 
Creston Charge, Creston, R. A. Thom- 
as, $2.50. Total, $77.87. 



DONATIONS IN KIND 

Mrs. Peter Field, Climax, N. C, 3 
coats; Madison S. S., Geo. W. Martin, 
Madison, N. C, Towelling, hose, hand- 
kerchiefs, doll, etc.; Mooresville S. S. 
class No. 4, Mrs. Frank Starrette, 
Mooresville, N. C, suit case full of 
clothes for small girls and boys, one 
and one-half dozen jara of fruit; W. 
H. M. S., Biltmore, N. C, 6 boxes of 
canned fruit; W. R. Alexander, Swan- 
nanoa, N. C, 1 barrel of apples; Spring 
Garden S. S., Greensboro, N. C, 3 
boxes containing canned fruit and veg- 
etables, oranges, articles of clothing, 
etc. 




Standard 

Memorial 

Windows 

Made in High Point 

Beautiful In design — 
Strong In construction. 
Largest and oldest glass 
plantin the South. Capac- 
ity for any and all orders 
and promptdelivery. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. Refer- 
ences—any of our old 
customers or any bank or 
banker In liliih Point. 
. Write for catalog. 
^ Standard M'.rror Co. 
\. High Point, N. C. 



CAN BLINDNESS BE PREVENTED? 

To answer the above question intelli- 
gently one must know something of 
the causes of blindness. It is easy 
enough to theorize about almost any 
abstract question but not always so 
easy to bring forth facts to substan- 
tiate a position. During the past two 
years 388 blind children have been 
enrolled in the State School for the 
Blind. Of these cases 87 are said to 
be congenital; the causes of 80 are 
not assigned or are unknown; Oph- 
thalmia neonatorum is credited with 
.9; accident with 33; fever with 10; 
aid to various other diseases smaller 
numbers are attributed. From the 
ibove it is to be seen that 2S9 of 
hese cases are credited to the above 
Ave named causes — nearly 75 per cent. 

In addition to the above statement 
lie facts go to show that out of 274 
of these children 47 are offspring of 
consanguineous marriages — more than 
17 per cent. Specialists are not all 
clear that the marriage of relations is 
the cause of blindness and other de- 
fects. Suffice it to say, however, that 
these figures cause one to "Sit up and 
take notice." 

The question again recurs: Can 
Blindness be Prevented? In view of 
the statistics given herewith it is clear 
to my mind that a large proportion of 
blindness is preventable. Statistics go 
to show that the marriage of persons 
congenitally blind or with serious de- 
fective vision is often followed by the 
birth of children themselves blind or 
partially blind. It is safe then to sug- 
gest that no two persons who have in 
their veins the blood of congenitally 
blind parents out ever to marry per- 
sons in like circumstances. Statistics 
go further to show that blindness is 
more likely to occur along collateral 
lines than in direct lines. 

It is mere speculation to say what 
might have been the conditions accom- 
panying the "80 cases of unknown." I 
am led to fear, however, that this may 
possibly be a hiding place made use of 
by the parents of some children. 

I am fully convinced that the 79 at- 
tributed to Ophthalmia neonatorum 
might have been prevented if proper 
medical attention had been given the 
eyes of these children immediately af- 
ter birth. And when one reflects that 
this is more than 23 per cent, of the 
whole number enrolled one can readily 
answer the question at least partially 
— Can Blindness be Prevented? And 
when we add to these figures 33 others 
whose blindness was caused by acci- 
dent the number of cases of prevent- 
able blindness is considerably enlarged 
— making nearly 30 per cent, of the 
whole number. Are not these facts 
sufficiently startling to cause our law 
makers; our physicians; our health 
officers and our parents to think se- 
riously? 

Another question naturally arises: 
What shall we do with the children of 
our State who are already blind? 
There have been nearly 400 in the 
State School for the Blind at various 
times during the past two years and 
yet I have the names of more than 100 
others who have never attended the 
School and who can not be admitted 
for lack of funds and room. The fact 
of the business is that the school is 
now so overcrowded as to cause serious 
apprehension as to the health and 
safety of those already enrolled. The 
maintenance fund of the school is less 
pro rata than it was 18 years ago. 
Because of these conditions the num- 
ber of admissions at the close of the 
past fiscal year was 46 less than it 
was two years ago and it has been 
found necessary to reduce the number 
of teachers and to shorten each ses- 
sion in order to live within the in- 
come. With all these handicaps, more 
than 80 per cent, of the graduates of 
the school — blind persons — are self- 
supporting, self-respecting citizens of 
their respective communities, bread 
winners in the race of life. With these 



facts staring us in the face will not our 
Legislators take some steps to remove 
the crippled condition of the school 
and place it where the afflicted chil- 
dren of the State may have at least an 
equal chance with the normal children 
in their efforts to secure an education 
and thus fit themselves for usefulness 
and productive citizenship? 

John E. Ray, 

Principal State School for the Blind. 

Raleigh, N. C, January 9, 1915. 



ON ENTERING THE NEW YEAR 

Let us begin the race of the New 
Year in happy confidence in God. Let 
us strip ourselves of all superfluous 
weights. Let us get rid of the para- 
lyzing influence that hides in doubt. 
Let us begin as those who are assured 
oi victory. 

"Come, let us anew our journey pur- 
sue, 

With vigor arise, 
And press to our home with the Lord 
in the skies." 

* * * * 

"Let us determine at the beginning 
of the New Year that we will possess 
ourselves of the courage which comes 
by faith. Let us be strong in the de- 
sire to do good, fearless in our opposi- 
tion to evil, brave in our conquest of 
sin. If we are, we have nothing to 
fear. All the issues are known to God, 
and God and one make a majority. 
'Only be thou strong and very cour- 
ageous.' " — Rev. R. J. Campbell. 

it 

"A new year is upon us, with new 
duties, new conflicts, new trials and 
new opportunities. Start on the jour- 
ney with Jesus — to walk with him, to 
work for him, and to win souls to 
him. It may be the last year of our 
lives! A happy year will it be to 
those who, through every path of trial 
or up every hill of difficulty, or over 
every sunny height, march on in clos- 
est fellowship with Jesus, and who de- 
termine that, come what may, they 
will have Christ every day!" — Dr. The- 
odore Cuyler. 

# * # # 

"The new year will be a happy one 
if God's presence goes with us all 
through its experiences. Some one 
once asked Miss Havergal haw to real- 
ize the Divine Presnce. Her senten- 
tious answer was: 'First, believe it; 
second, recollect it!' It would seem 
impossible to forget so big and blessed 
a being as God. Yet thousands ac- 
complish that feat of folly each day. 
If we want to have God bless us, we 
must first of all recollect that there is 
such a being in the universe. We must 
believe, as is said in Hebrew, that 
GOD IS." — Zion's Herald. 



A STORY OF JENNY LIND 

Jenny Lind and Grisi were rivals 
for popular favor in London. Both 
were invited to sing the same night 
at a court concert. Jenny Lind, be- 
ing the younger, sang first, and was so 
disturbed by the fierce, scornful look 
of Grisi that she was at the point of 
failure, when suddenly an inspiration 
came to her. The accompanist was 
striking his final chords. She asked 
him to rise and took the vacant seat. 
Her fingers wandered over the keys 
in a loving prelude, then she sang a 
little prayer which she had loved as a 
child. She hadn't sung it for years. 
As she sang she. was no longer in the 
presence of royalty, but was singing 
to loving friends in her fatherland. 

Softly at first the plaintive notes 
floated on the air- swelling louder and 
richer every moment. The singer 
seemed to throw her whole soul into 
the weird, thrilling, plaintive prayer. 
Gradually the song died away and end- 
ed in a sob. There was silence — the 
silence of admiring wonder. The au- 
dience sat spellbound. Jenny Lind 
lifted her sweet eyes to look into the 
scornful face that had so disconcerted 
her. There was no fierce expression 
now; instead, a teardrop glistened on 
the long black lashes, and after a mo- 
ment with the impulsiveness of a child 
of the tropics, Grisi crossed to Jenny 
Lind's side, placed her arm about her 
and kissed her utterly regardless of 
the audience. — Exchange. 



is the Answrfla 




STOPS TOBACCO HABIT 

Elders Sanitarium, located at 513 
Main St., St. Joseph, Mo., has publish- 
ed a book showing the deadly effect of 
the tobacco habit, and how it can be 
stopped in three to five days. 

As they are distributing this book 
free, anyone wanting a copy should 
send their name and address at once. 

Fruit All the Year 

Get a few early Peaches, some mid- 
season Apples, Pears, Peaches, Plums, 
Grapes, then some winter Apples and 
Pecans, and you can have fresh fruit 
the year round. "Eat all you can, and 
can all you can't." 

Our catalog gives full .information as 
to varieties. Prices always reasonable. 

Tell us your tree wants. We havo 
them ready for you. Also Roses, 
Flowering Shrubs and other ornamen- 
tals. Immediate shipment if desired. 
Place order promptly. 

HOWARD NURSERY CO., 
Box J210 Stovall, N. C. 



I Tsie Merriam Webster 

= Every day in your talk and reading, at || 
= home, on the street car, in the office, shop = 
= and school you likely question the mean- — 
= ing of some new word. A friend asks: 
= "Wha>t makes mortar harden?" Yon seek 
g the location of Loch Katrine or the pronun- 
■= cialion of jujutsu. What is uhite coal? 
= This New Creation answers all kinds of 
= questions in Language, History, Biography, 
= Fiction, Foreign Words, Trades, Arts and 
3 Sciences, with final authority. 
= 400,009 Words. 
j| 6000 Illustrations, 
g Coet $400,000* 
§§ 2700 Pases. 
H The only dictionary with 
= the new divided page, — char. 
s acterized as "A Stroke oi / 
£ Genius." 
g India Paper Edition; 
s On thin, opaque, strong, 
= India paper. What a satis- 
= faction toown theMeniam 
s Webster in a form so light 
s and so convenient to use I 
= One half the thickness and 
= weight of Regular Edition. 
s Regular Edition : 
= On strong book paper. Wt, 
§ 14% lbs. Size 12% x 9% x 
= 5 inches. 

= Write for specimen j>age«, 

:H illustration)!, etc, 
== Mention this 
publication 

- - and receive) 

= FREE a. set 

= of pocket) 

H maps. 

I G.&C. 
I MERRtAnf 

1 Springfield, Mass^§|l 




pllljilll! 

HELP WANTED LADIES 

Ladies of character may earn nice in- 
come at home every month taking orders 
from friends for REIP'S high class Toilet 
Articles, Fairy Creme, Perfume, Food Fla- 
voring Extracts and full line. Liberal 
commission paid. This is for married or 
single women, young or old. References 
required. Get our free Instruction book. 
We teach you how to succeed from the 
start. Honorable, dignified work. Write 
now and get territory and beautiful sam- 
ple case. 

United Stores Drug Co., 813 Cherry Street, 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Positive proof from oldest Records 
that John baptized by Sprinkling. 68- 
page book, only 16 cents in stamps. 
Mahaffey Co., Box 12, Batesburg, S. C. 




Bl VMVETD TOLUE OTHEB BELLS 

!_ I IVl ¥ S.T\ ifrgjSiVSWEETES, HOSE EUB- 
ruiinru ABLE, LOWER PBICE. 

tnUril/ri ^^onsFBEECATALoaDE 
U Hi Sj JS. ^ TELLS WHY. 
to Cincinnati Bell Foundry Co., Cincinnati, 0. 



Christian Finance Association, 8oMacdcn Lor\e, New York. 



WE PAY $80 A MONTH SALARY 

and furnish rig and all expenses to Introduce our 
guaranteed poultfy and otock powders. Address 
BUGLER COMPANY, X708 v SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



January 14, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Fifteen 



Quarterly Meetings J 



ASHEVILLE DISTRICT— C. A. Wood, 
Presiding Elder, Weavervllle, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Mills River, Shaw's Creek 9-10 

Central, night 10 

Flat Rock, Flat Rock 16-17 

Tryon and Saluda, Tryon 17-18 

Fairview, Tweeds 23-24 

North Asheville, night 24 

Walnut, Jewel Hill 30-31 

Hot Sp'gs and Marshall, Marshall, night 31 

February 

Sulphur Springs, Laurel Hill 6-7 

West Asheville, night 7 

Swannanoa, Swannanoa 13-14 

Black Mountain, night 14 

Weavervllle Ct., Flint Hill 20-21 

Bethel, night 21 

There will be a meeting of the preach- 
ers ol the district at Haywood Street 
church, Thursday, Dec. 10th, at 2 p. m., 
and at night. All preachers urged to be 
present. 

District stewards meeting at Central 
church, Friday, Dec. 11th, at 10 a. m. 



CHARLOTTE DISTRICT— J. C. Rowe, 
Presiding Elder, Charlotte, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Thrift, Thrift 2-3 

Dilworth, Dilworth, night 3 

Marshville, Center 9 

Monroe, Central 10 

Monroe, North Monroe, night 10 

Prospect, Carmel 16-17 

Unionville, Grace, p. m 17-18 

Mprven, Bethel 24-25 

Wadesboro, Wadesboro, night 25 

Polkton, Peachland 30 

Lilesville, Lilesville 31 

February 

Ansonville, Ansonville 6-7 

Waxhaw, Waxhaw 13-14 

Spencer Memorial 21 

GREENSBORO DISTRICT— J. H. Weav- 
er, Presiding Elder, Greensboro, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Randolph Ct., Mt. Vernon 2-3 

Spring Garden, p. m 3 

Coleridge Ct., Coleridge 9-10 

Ramseur and F'ville, Ramseur 10-11 

Wesley Memorial, H. Pt, 11 a. m 17 

East and West, 3 p. m 17 

Main St., 7 p. m 17 

Randleman and Naomi, St. Paul ..23-24 

Asheboro 24-25 

Uwharrie Ct., Concord 30-31 

Denton Ct, Denton 31-1 

February 

Deep River, Cedar Falls 6-7 

West Market 13-14 

The district stewards will meet at West 
Market Street church, Tuesday, Dec. 1 
at 10 a. m. 



MT. AIRY DISTRICT— H. C. Sprinkle, 
Presiding Elder, Mt. Airy, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Leaksville, night 1-2 

Spray, night, 2; 11 a. m 3 

Draper, 3 p. m 2-3 

Danbury 9-10 

Rural Hall, Germanton 16-17 

Tadkinville, Prospect 23-24 

Elkln. night 29-31 

Jonesville 30-31 

February 

Dobson, Stony Knoll 6-7 

Pilot Mountain, Pilot Mountain 13-14 

Ararat, Chestnut Grove 20-21 

Mt. Airy Ct., Zion 27-28 



NORTH WILKESBORO DISTRICT— J. H. 
Bennett, Presiding Elder, North 
Wllkesboro, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Jefferson, Bethany 9-10 

Helton, Sabbath Home 13 

Creston, Creston 16-17 

Watauga, Henson's Chapel 23-24 

Elk Park, Elk Park 30-31 

February 

Avery, Fairview 6-7 

Boone, Rutherwood 13-14 

Laurel Springs, Transon 20-21 

Sparta, Potato Creek 27-28 

Revival Meetings 

January 

Creston, Creston 14-21 

February 

Avery, Fairview 2-11 

Laurel Springs, Transon 16-23 



SALISBURY DISTRICT— W. R. Ware, 
Presiding Elder, Salisbury, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Salem Ct., Salem 3-4 

Concord, Central, 11 a. m 10 

West Concord, Harmony, 3 p. m 10 

Concord, Epworth, night 10 

Kannapolis Station 15-17 

Kannapolis Ct., Oak Grove 16-17 

China. Grove and Landis, China Gr., 17-18 



Bethel and Love's Chapel, Bethel ..23-24 

Concord, Westford, night 24 

Gold Hill Ct., Gold Hill 30-31 

New London Ct., New London 30-febl 

District stewards' meeting Salisbury, 
Dec. 4, 10 a. m. 



STATESVI LLE DISTRICT— L. T. Mann, 
Presiding Elder, Statesville, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Stoney Point Ct., Stoney Pt., 11 a. m., 9-10 
Alexander Ct., Taylorsville, night ..10-11 

Maiden Ct, St. Paul, 11 a. m 16-17 

Newton Sta., Newton, night . . 17-18 

Hickory Ct., Marvin, 11 a. m 23-24 

Catawba Ct, Catawba, night 24-25 

Statesville Ct, N. S'ville, 11 a. m., 30-31 
Broad St, Broad St., night 31-Feb. 1 

February 

Mt. Zion and Huntersville, Mt. Zion, 

11 a. m 6-7 

Davidson, Davidson, night 7-8 

Mooresville Ct., Fair View, 11 a. m., 13-14 
Mooresville Sta., Mooresville, night, 14-15 
Cool Spring Ct, Cool Spg., 11 a. m., 20-21 
Troutman Ct, Shepherds, 11 a. m., 27-28 
The district stewards, pastors and lay 
leaders will meet in Broad Street church 
at Statesville on Thursday, Dec. 17, at 
12 o'clock noon. A full attendance of the 
above persons is earnestly urged. 



SHELBY DISTRICT— J. R. Scroggs. Pre- 
siding Elder, Shelby, N. C 
First Round 

January 

Belwood, Palm Tree 2-3 

Polkville, Polkville 3-4 

King's Mountain, King's Mountain ..9-10 

South Fork, Russell's Chapel 16 

Lincoln ton, Lincoln ton 17 

Crouse, Crouse 23 

Stanly, Stanly 24-25 

Shelby Ct, Sharon 30 

Second Round 

January 

Shelby, Central 31 

Cherryville, Cherryville 31 

February 

Dallas and Ozark, Dallas 6 

West End, Franklin Avenue 6 

Gastonia, Main Street 7-8 

Lowesville, Snow Hill 13-14 

Mt. Holly, Mt. Island 14-15 

Bessemer, Concord 20-21 

King's Mountain, King's Mountain 21 

Belwood, Kadish 27-28 

March 

Polkville, Polkville 6-7 

Lowell, Lowell 13-14 

McAdenville, McAdenville 14 

Rock Spring, Mt. Pleasant 20-21 

District Stewards at Shelby January 15, 
at 2 o'clock p. m. 



M ORG ANTON DISTRICT— J. E. Gay, 
Presiding Elder, Marlon, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Thermal City, PIsgah 2-3 

Green River, Lebanon 9-10 

Broad River, Wesley's Chapel 16-17 

Henrietta and Caroleen, Henrietta ..17-18 

Cliff side, Cliff side 23-24 

Morganton Ct, Salem 30-31 

Connelly Springs, Rutherford College, 

31-Feb.l 
February 

Spruce Pine and Bakersville, Spruce 

Pine 6-7 

Micaville, South Toe 6-7 

Bald Creek, Bald Creek 13-14 

Burnsville 14-15 

Marion Ct., Green Mountain 20-21 



WAYNESVILLE DISTRICT— L. T. Cor- 
dell, Presiding Elder, Asheville, N. C, 
R. F. D. No. 2 
First Round 

January 

Waynesville Station 9-10 

Sylva Charge, night 10 

Webster Ct, Cullowhee 16-17 

Glenville Ct, East La Porte 17-18 

Hayesville Ct., Oak Forest 23-24 

Murphy Ct, Tomotla 27-28 

Ranger Ct., Salem 29-80 

Murphy Station 31 

February 

Tudson Ct, Maple Springs 2-3 

Robbinsville Ct, Robbinsville 4-5 

Andrews Station 6-7 

Macon Ct, Union 13-14 

Franklin Ct, Salem 16-17 

Highlands Ct, Highlands 18-19 

Franklin Station 21-22 

District stewards, pastors and lay lead- 
ers meeting at Bryson City Dec. 10. 



WINSTON DISTRICT— H. K. Boyer, 
Presiding Elder, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 
First Round 

' January 

Davidson, Mount Olivet 2-3 

Salem, night 3 

Jackson Hill, New Hope 9-10 

Farmington, Farmington 16-17 

Mocksville, night 17 

Davie, Oak Grove 23-24 

Cooleemee, night 24 

Lewisville, Sharon 30-31 

February 

Kernersville, Kernersville 6-T 




CABBAGE PLANTS 



GROWN FROM EXPENSIVE SEED 

I pay from three to Ave times as much for Peter 
Henderson & Co.'sseedas other planters pay for 
ordinary seed. Actual figures, $3.50 per lb. for 
Wakeflelds, $4.00 per lb. for Flat Butch, against 7oc. per lb. for ordinary seed. 
My customers get the benefit in 

PERFECT PLANTS AT NO EXTRA COST 

Why not plant cabbage grown from high-grade seed and raise a successful crop, 
rather than use plants from inferior seed and be disappointed in the results ? It 
costs no more. 

If I am out of the variety you want I will tell you. I NEVER SUBSTITUTE EX- 
| CEPT WHEN REQUESTED BY THE PURCHASER. 

Prices by Express: 1,000 to 4,000, $1.50 per 1,000; 5,000 to 9,000, $1.25 

per 1,000; 10,000 or over $1.00 per 1,000. 

Varieties: Early Jersey Wakefield, Charleston 
Wakefield, Henderson's Succession, Flat Dutch, 
All Frost Proof. Order early to be sure of the 
variety you want. 



JOS. M.HARRISON 

CHARLESTON. S.C. 



Succession 





4% 



You The The The 
Decide: School: Methods: Results! 



A lew Reasons Why You Should Enroll With Us 

We teacK Stenorypy, the fastest method of writing. Our courses teach you. to 
know. We train you to grasp your opportunity. Latest improved methods. Your 
choice of Jjlpe different systems of shorthand, two of them hold world's record for 
speed arjjjjpaccurac.y. ^ 

■s and terms most reasonable. Real business courses as taught at a real 

commer ~ 
position! 



allege. Results unequalled. Twenty- five students recently placed in 
further information and terms. Do not put off this important step. 



BUSINESS COLLEGE, ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 

T S. SPRADLIN, President 



CABBAGE PLANTS 

The Original Frost Proof Varieties Ready for Shipping 

All plants grown in open air on South Carolina Sea 
Coast will stand severe cold without injury; none better 
could possibly be grown. Early Jersey Wakeflelds, 
Charleston Wakeflelds, Successions and Flat Dutch. 
Prices F. O. B. here, 500 plants §1 .00; 1,000 plants $1.50; 
5,000 plants §6.25; 10,000 plants $10.00. Plants shipped 
by parcel post, 35 cents per 100, postage paid. 




THE GEO. L. SaiMDS CO., 

We Ship in Large Quantities Either 



RMVTOWLES, s. c. 

rr> Express or Parcel Post. 



Direct From Tne Famous Gurley Show Cases cannot be had 
from any other mam/ "acturer in America. Our 
goods received 



til . \- 



Show Cases Factory 

double award at the Jamestown Exposition. A Jobber 
who has been selling Gurley Show Cases for nine years, 
says that only one customer has made any complaint of 
our goods, and only one small ck.se was involved in his 
complaint. This Is a wonderful record. We sell direct 
to the merchant. Drug store outfits a specialty. For drug 
store outfits ask for catalogue "V"; for wall or street 
cases ask for catalogue "W"; for general line ask for 
catalogue "T." 
HIGH POINT SHOW CASE WORKS High Point, North Carolina 




G 9 



'^a 



GREENSBORO NURSERIES 

AGENTS WANTED 

For Fruit, Shade and Ornamental Trees, Vines and Plants. 

JOHN A. YOUNG & SONS, Greensboro, N. C. 



PAPER SHELL PECAN TREES. 



Best varieties. Choice 
stock. Our reputation 
is our best salesman. If you buy 200 or more trees we will dynamite your land 
and plant your trees FREE. CORDELE NURSERIES, Cordele, Georgia 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY IN- 
STITUTES 

January 

Asheville District, Central church, 13 

Charlotte District, Marshville 19-20 

Greensboro District, High Point, 20-21 
Morganton District, Forest City, 13-14 

Mt. Airy District 22-23 

N. Wilkesboro Dist., N. W'boro, 18-20 

Salisbury District, 

Shelby District, Lincolnton 15-16 

Statesville District, Statesville. . .14-15 

Waynesville District, Clyde 12-13 

Winston District, Lexington 21-22 



THE HELPER 

A Helpful Sermon each week. In- 
ternational Lesson Notes. 75 cents 
a year — 40 weeks. Trial offer: 6 
numbers 10 cents. 

Stamps or Silver 
Address: Rev. R. S. Fischer, 
2129 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



THIS SPACE BELONGS TO 

ROBT. W.MURRAY 

GENERAL 

INSURANCE 

Greensboro, North Carolina 
308 J / 2 South Elai St. 
Phone 163 



MILLER, ROBINS & WEILL 

General Insurance 

General Agents Fidelity and 
Deposit Company of Maryland 
108 Nor*h F In Strer* '»*»<>■»•*. Aa 



Page Sixteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 14, 1915 



PUBLISHER'S ANNOUNCEMENT 

— FOR THE NEW YEAR 

ADVOCATE DAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 17th 



A CONCERTED MOVEMENT WITH TWO AIMS 
1. To Increase Our Circulation 

The Board of Publication realizes that the matter of 
prime consideration is circulation. No matter how ex- 
cellent our paper may be it can not accomplish its mis- 
sion without a large circulation. We must find out how 
to get it into the homes of our people and induce them 
as far as possible to become interested in its contents. 
It is no small part of the task of the pastor to induce 
his people to become a reading people. To accomplish 
this he must furnish them something to read.- The place 
to begin is with the periodical literature of his church, 
and first among these is the Conference paper. 

By agreement of the editor, Presiding Elders, 
Lay Leaders and Board of Missions in the meeting at 
Salisbury, in December, Sunday, January 17th, was set 
apart specially as Advocate Day, with the week follow- 
ing for special canvass with the view, if possible, of 
placing the paper in every home — certainly with the 
view of placing it in many new homes. 

2. To Secure the Renewals 

The management finds a great problem on its hands 
by hundreds of persons who failed to send in their 
renewals last year. We do not want to cut any off 
who mean to renew. On the other hand it is runious to 
the business to carry these along further if they do 
not intend to pay what they owe. So the second ob- 
ject of this Advocate Day and week is to secure these 
renewals and collect up back dues as far as possible and 
remove all from the list who will not make settlement. 
This year we must insist that pastors and churches see 
that this is attended to with as much diligence as the 
securing of new subscribers. We must have the pay- 
ment of arrears or the removal of names from the list. 
Co-operation in this matter will mean the saving of 
thousands of dollars. 

i Prompt Renewals Necessary 

The Board has been compelled to request the mana- 
ger to urge the prompt renewal of subscriptions. The 
careless manner in which a large number deal with the 
Advocate in this respect is costing us a large amount 
each year. The Board does not wish any one deprived 
of his paper for even a single week, but judging from 
past experience it is absolutely necessary for us to adopt 
more nearly a cash-in-advance system. We are now 
facing a financial problem on account of the falling off 
of our advertising business. The war scare has so para- 
lyzed business that our advertising managers have net 
only failed to develop new business, but have had to 
cancel most of the outstanding orders. This makes it 
necessary that we collect more closely on our subscrip- 
tion list. The Board has therefore requested the Mana- 
ger to send statements to all whose subscriptions have 
expired so as to remind them of the necessity for prompt 
renewal. It is too expensive to send these statements if 
it can be avoided, se we urge that renewals be attended 
to on Advocate Day, or during the week followings, be- 
fore it becomes necessary to send out statements. 

Throwing Away a Great Opportunity 
At great expense of toil, sacrifice and money we 
build a plant capable of sending a message every week 



into every home represented in ou.- membership. By 
failure to co-operate on some plan that would make it 
possible to achieve this, we simply throw away a great 
opportunity — perhaps, in an important sense, the great- 
est opportunity open to us. In all our work as a 
church, whether it be in effort to promote evangelism, 
or to send the gospel to the regions beyond, we are 
dealing with the problem of ignorance. Enlightenment 
is the great essential if we would carry out our Master's 
Great Commission, and we must teach if we would 
evangelize and save. We are to go forth teaching men 
to observe whatsoever Jesus came to the world to re- 
veal; and while preaching is ever the chief agency of 
evangelization, we must not ignore the printed message 
which, more than all other agencies of enlightenment, pre- 
pares the way for the message of a living ministry. 

So Many People Do Not Read 

What if they do not read? It is our problem again 
not only to bring our people the printed message but to 
lead them to peruse and appreciate it. While it may be 
the most difficult duty of the pastor, it is, nevertheless, his 
duty to promote the reading habit among his people. 
The people will certainly not read our literature unless 
we somehow manage to place it in their hands. Therefore, 
the slogan which should never be abandoned is, "our 
Church paper in every home." The process may seem 
very slow and the work may be exceedingly discour- 
aging, but if we keep on hammering away we shall after 
awhile reach the goal. When we have compassed this 
and our people become intelligently devoted to the 
church it will not be hard to tap the fountain of benefi- 
cence and send the streams of saving power to the ends 
of the earth. 

We act very foolishly if we do not work a periodical 
such as the North Carolina Christian Advocate for all 
that it is worth. The way to give it strength and virility 
is to give it circulation. Only in this way can we make 
it possible for the paper itself "to grip" the people 
with its messages from week to week. 

Our Job Department 

The Board calls attention again + o the importance 
of patronizing our Job Printing Department. We now 
have a fine equipment and ample facilities for handling 
a general job business and the business has developed 
very satisfactorily; but only a few of our business men. 
here and yonder, seem to have thought of the impor- 
tance of patronizing this department. We are carry- 
ing on this business for no other reason than that of 
helping to make the Advocate. This fact ought to ap- 
peal to our people, and we feel assured it does when fully 
understood. 

With the hearty good will and support of the whole 
Conference, there is no reason why we may not double 
the circulation of the Advocate, and thus multiply its 
power for good by two, at the same time double our 
general printing business with little increase of expense, 
giving a very comfortable stipend to the worthy claim- 
ants upon our fund. 

THE BOARD OF PUBLICATION, 

Greensboro, N. C. 



north Carolina 



CDn'stian 




Advocate 



Official Orpt of \k Western Korth &rolina£onferenc* 
IHtf fooaist episcopal £lwrcft, Soutl) 



Volume LX 



Greensboro, N. C, Thursday, Januan^o"^ 1915 




Number 3 



A WORD PICTURE 



St. Peter says Christ "hath called us out of darkness into 
his marvelous light." 

On a summer's night, I have camped on the shoulder of 
Carolina's highest mountain. Waking in the dense darkness 
before dawn, I have seen nothing, save night's trailing robe 
around me. No world of wonderful, sentinel summits guard- 
ing the green valleys. Shut in under the shadow, there was 
no world to me. Then I have heard, from some friend on the 
summit, a clear call, cutting the gloom, calling: "Come up into 
the light." I have rushed to the top. I have seen the gates of 
dawn unclose; resplendent lances of light smiting the surround- 
ing summits with a golden glory, driving the darkness back 
down to where silver streamlets rumbled and rushed to the 
sea. Even so, I have seen many a man enveloped in spiritual 
darkness, every tendency earthward, every passion bestial, shut 
out from all vision of the eternal. Then, from the shining 
summits has sounded the call: "I am the Light of the world; if 
any man follow me, he shall not walk in darkness, but shall 
have the Light of Life." 

As he has heard this call, I have seen the light break on 
his face with greater glory than it even smote the summits of 
Mt. Mitchell or Clingman's Dome. I have seen a new man 
come up out of that darkness to meet a new world, with new 
hopes and dreams and passions and purposes, glad in the 
glory of being a man — a son of God. — Extract from sermon by 
Rev. W. E. Ahernethy 



m 




m 



Page Two 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 21, 1915 



North Carolina Christian Advocate 



Entered at the Post Office at Greensboro, N. C, as 
mail matter of the second class. 



HUGH M. BLAIR, Editor 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

On« Year $1.50 

Six Months 75 

To all preachers of the Gespelj per year l.Ki 

Maks all remittances to 
Christian Advocate, - - - - Greensboro, N. C. 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

It is not our custom to discontinue subscriptions 
when the time paid for expires, without notice. Sub- 
scribers who do not wish the paper continued should 
send notice to discontinue direct to the office. Oth- 
erwise they will be expected to pay for the paper 



CONFERENCE SPECIALS 

On our fourth, page this week we give a 
list of Conference Specials for which we are 
indebted to Rev. Frank Siler, our Conference 
Field Secretary of Missions. This list will be 
read with great interest and we have no doubt 
many of our readers will be surprised to see 
how the missionary spirit has been developed 
during the last few years. 



THIS IS ADVOCATE WEEK 

The unfavorable weather last Sunday and 
continuing through the early days of the week 
has of course hindered much in the execution 
of plans for the observance of Advocate Day 
and Week. However, we are already receiving 
some good reports and the promise to continue 
the work till completed. We beg to remind all 
who are in arrears not to forget that this is 

Pay-Up Week 
for all who have fallen behind and for any who 
should renew. We shall expect the work to be 
continued, the pastors arranging and following 
up their own plans. We are grateful for the 
co-operation of pastors and people. 



OUR CHILDREN'S HOME 

Next Sunday a week, January 31st, is a fifth 
Sunday. Superintendent Thompson tells us 
that the last fifth Sunday did not bring as 
large results as usual. It was perhaps over- 
looked in some places. 

We call attention to this now so that all may 
be thinking about it. Next Sunday each Sun- 
day school superintendent and all the teach- 
ers should call special attention to this and 
have their schools and classes prepared to make 
a liberal contribution on the following Sun- 
day. We must not forget our little boys and 
girls at the Home. They t have no homes 
where father and mother provide, but must 
look to others, and we ought to be glad to make 
the home into which we have taken them at 
Winston-Salem as much like a real home to 
them as possible. 

Let this be called to the attention of all next 
Sunday, with the special request that a good 
contribution be ready on the fifth Sunday. 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

The Annual Meeting of the Woman 's Mission- 
ary Society of the Western North Carolina 
Conference will be held in Tryon Street church, 
Charlotte, beginning on Friday, January 29. 
Next to the Annual Conference we have no 
meeting of greater interest and importance. In 
a little more than thirty years, our women have 
demonstrated their superior efficiency in carry- 
ing on the work of the Master. A glance at the 
reports each year will show that, in organizing 
and directing the work of education and in car- 
rying forward the world's evangelization, they 
have been the most powerful auxiliary of the 
modern church. 

They have not only raised large sums of 
money, but have stimulated the spirit of liber- 
ality in all the churches, and have placed their 
own lives upon the altar of service in such a 
way as to challenge the admiration of the world. 
As time goes on and the work increases we are 
more and more amazed that so many centuries 
should have elapsed before she should have 
been accorded her place, and that even yet there 



are those who would relegate her to social ob- 
scurity. 

The Advocate hails our sisters in behalf of 
our Conference and joins in the wish and prayer 
that their meeting in 1915 may be the most 
pleasant, profitable and encouraging in all their 
history. 



HOW SALOONS HELP REVENUE 

Rev. Dr. Barton, of Texas, in his 
speech at Raleigh was very happy in his man- 
ner of handling the question of liquor license 
as a producer of revenue. While the argument 
was of course not new, yet he showed in a 
very striking way the economic absurdity of li- 
censing the saloon in order to raise revenue. 

For every dollar thrown into the treasury 
by license tax ten or more are drawn out for 
footing the bills of court costs and the support 
of penal institutions crowded with the victims 
of the drink vice, to say nothing of the cost of in- 
stitutions of charity and the economic waste of 
the productive power of a healthy manhood. 

For about fifty years this country has been 
endeavoring to raise a large part of its reve- 
nue by a tax on spirituous liquors. The result 
is that we have in reality been expending at 
least ten dollars for every dollar realized as 
revenue. At the same time we have fastened 
upon ourselves a system which has placed a 
premium upon the evasion of law, the evil ef- 
fects of which will be felt for generations. It 
is encouraging to see, however, how rapidly our 
people are coming to see the absurdity of this 
old revenue humbug, and with what unanimity 
public sentiment is lining up for a last success- 
ful siege of this citadel of satan. Twenty years 
from now the whole nation will be wondering 
why we ever consented to tax the worse than 
widows and orphans of the land to raise reve- 
nue even in an emergency. What a shame that 
this great country should have consented to 
commercialize vice! 



MAKING SURE OF RESULTS 

Dr. J. 0. Peck was a great pastor evangelist. 
He knew what the mission of a Methodist 
preacher is and applied himself diligently to 
the task of conserving results as well as to the 
promotion of evangelism. On one occasion he 
sent in to the church paper a list of more than 
three hundred subscribers, more than one hun- 
dred of whom were new converts. In his letter 
to the editor he said : " I never feel quite sure of 
the permanency of additions to the church till 
I have put the Christian Advocate in the fam- 
ily, and usually I find that one of the earliest 
signs of backsliding is the giving up of the re- 
ligious paper." 

There is food for thought here and we com- 
mend the wisdom of this suggestion of one of 
the most consecrated and successful pastors of 
the past century. 

There are many people planting orchards to- 
day. It has been discovered that much of the 
waste lands of Florida, as well as the rugged 
mountain lands in Western North Carolina, 
are capable of producing almost fabulous 
wealth in the production of fruit. But those 
who plant trees and leave them to shift for 
themselves, without culture, wilLfind that, be- 
fore the time for fruit, the trees have either 
been overshadowed by noxious growths, or de- 
stroyed by scale or other enemies of the or- 
chard. So it is in all our work to bring men 
into the Kingdom of God and safely anchor 
them to a life of righteousness and happy and 
useful living. We must not only bring them in- 
to the church, but we must give attention to 
the essential matter of nurture and growth. In 
no other way can we make sure of permanent 
reults. 



THE REVIVAL WE NEED 

Every devout reader of the Advocate will 
agree that we need the revival. Everywhere the 
cry is ready to go up in phorus, ' ' 0 Lord, revive 
thy work. ' ' In spite of the enervating effect of 
worldliness there is a spark remaining in many 
hearts ready to be fanned into a flame under 
favorable conditions. Every wise pastor will 
endeavor to fan these sparks until he sees show- 
ers of blessings falling upon the church. 

The revival we need is one that will save us as 



Christians from a half-hearted service and a 
half-hearted experience. How it would liberate 
many a soul and send him bounding toward the 
joys of heaven if he would only make up his 
mind to leave all and follow Christ. There 
are so many who have never fully made up their 
minds as to whether they would consecrate all 
to the service of God. Their affections are 
divided and they are reserving some place still 
for the gratification of self. Such a service 
can never be a happy service. The late Rev. 
Dr. Cuyler in referring to this says : 

"Some are fettered by besetting sins, from 
which they have never cut loose. They have 
never made a clean break with the old sinful 
self, or with the beggarly elements of this 
world ; they are hobbled with practices and as- 
sociates that they have never cut loose from. 
They have probably passed from death unto 
life, yet they appear very much as Lazarus 
would have looked if he had walked the streets 
of Bethany in his ghastly grave-clothes! This 
is a pitiable style of religion; it brings but lit- 
tle joy to its possessor, and gives him or her 
no power in the community. While they are 
content to be what they are there is no hope for 
such manacled professors. Their only hope is 
in a timely and thorough repentance, and a 
fresh work of Christ, a deeper and thorough 
work, and for this they must earnestly seek, or 
else they will be chained birds in a church-cage 
to the last. 

"To every member of our churches who is 
dragging out a half-dead religion, the Holy 
Spirit comes with the arousing call: 'If ye be 
indeed risen with Christ, seek those things 
which are above!' Instead of sitting in the 
gates of the tomb, cast away your grave-clothes, 
and begin to live as Christ's freemen and 
Christ's witnesses, and the heirs of a magnifi- 
cent inheritance. Look higher ! Live higher ! ! 
Get a new grip on Christ and then go out and 
labor to draw sinners from the pit of hell. This 
is the revival we all need." 



THE ANTI-SALOON CONVENTION 

It seems an anomalous situation which ntakes 
it necessary for the temperance forces of North 
Carolina to be working hard in 1915 to se- 
cure what they voted for by an overwhelm- 
ing majority in 1908. Yet such is the case. 
By every imaginable device the enemies of 
sobriety have endeavored to nullify the pro- 
hibition act, and to this date there has not 
been an amendment to our statute which has 
been wholly effective in stopping liquor ship- 
ments. . tf 

The present legislature, it itt said, will pass 
any reasonable measure that may be proposed. 
Much hinges about that one word reasonable. 
There are some people, doubtless, who mean 
by that that they will support any measure 
that will not interfere with the privilege, or 
as they term it, the right, of the individual to 
have liquor shipped to him. And herein lies 
the peril of the movement which has been 
launched to stop all the cracks in our law. 
As long as it is conceded that individuals have 
an inalienable right to have liquor shipped to 
them, there will be no end to the express jug 
trade. The members of this legislature know 
very well that the overwhelming sentiment of 
the State now favors the enactment of a law 
that will place liquor in a class with cocaine 
and other dangerous drugs which no law-abid- 
ing citizen would claim the right to handle or 
traffic in indiscriminately. They know that 
every religious body of any standing and moral 
influence has, by resolution or petition, re- 
quested that our law be so amended as to put a 
stop to liquor shipments. Now why should 
even the Anti-Saloon League hesitate a mo- 
ment to ask for such a law? 

But we set in to tell something of the Con- 
vention. There was not a very large attend- 
ance, but the body was fully representative 
of all sections of the State. There was no 
devision as to what is wanted, yet after thor- 
ough deliberation the fqrmulation of an amend- 
ment to our law so as to stop liquor shipment 
was referred to a special committee who should 
likewise co-operate with Rev. R. L. Davis, the 
Superintendent, in securing the passage of the 
act. Following is the committee: W. H. With- 
erspoon, of Richmond County ; J. A. Brown, of 



January 21, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Three 



Chadbourn; C. H. Ireland, of Greensboro; 
R. L. Davis, of Raleigh; Dr. R. T. Vann, of 
Raleigh; Judge J. C. Pritchard, of Asheville, 
and W. T. Shaw, of Weldon. 

This is regarded as a strong committee, and 
these men may be relied upon to do all that 
can be done to get our law in such shape as 
to shut off entirely the shipment of strung 
drink into the state. 

There were some very strong and lively 
discussions, but perfect unanimity as to the 
one main purpose. By resolution offered by 
Mr. John A. Oates, of Fayetteville, Sunday, 
January 24, was made Anti-Saloon Day in all 
the Sunday schools and churches, and the Com- 
mittee and Superintendent were requested to 
prepare a form of petition to be presented and 
signed requesting the Legislature to pass the 
act. We trust superintendents, teachers, pas- 
tors and all our good people will co-operate in 
this effort to put behind this the combined mor- 
al sentiment of the state. Forms for petition are 
published in another column. 

The Convention was favored with some fine 
speeches by special visitors, notably Rev. Dr. 
A. J. Barton, of Waco, Texas, and Hon. Rich- 
mond Pearson Hobson, of Alabama. We re- 
gretted very much the necessity of leaving on 
Thursday afternoon and thus being deprived 
of hearing Mr. Hobson. 

Altogether, it may be said that this Conven- 
tion was in personel very much nearer a full 
state delegation than any previously held, and 
if the legislature fails to give us what we ask 
there will be great disappointment. We be- 
lieve they will grant our request. Meantime, 
let every one keep in close touch with those 
who represent them, both in the House and 
in the Senate. 



NOTE AND COMMENT 

Strange Results of War are reported in Ger- 
many. Some would suppose from what we see 
in many publications that all Germany had 
gone mad with militarism. This is evidently 
far from the truth and it is likely that after 
a while the spirit of the people rather than of 
a few war lords will be dominant. Prof. Au- 
gust Lange, of the University of Halle, Ger- 
many, writing to a correspondent in this coun- 
try, says: "The churches are full to overflow- 
ing, as they have not been for decades. Relig- 
ious sentiment, which seemed to have become 
lax with the masses, has taken on a new lease 
of life. ' ' Another correspondent, writing from 
Germany, says: "A new religious earnestness 
has come upon our nation. It is retracing its 
way to the God of its fathers and therewith to 
the best source of its strength. There is a 
stern protest against the frivolity and coarse- 
ness of the past. Our faith would never have 
thought such a change possible, and it is a won- 
derful joy for all Christian men to see such a 
holy awakening." 

# ^ ^ 

The United States ought not to rush into the 
organization of a great army and navy so as to 
be classed with great military powers. Those 
who would cultivate the military spirit are 
striving hard to use the present war in Europe 
as an excuse for urging great expenditure for 
increasing the fighting strength of the nation. 
They seem to ignore the fact that great arma- 
ments have precipitated the ruinous war now 
going on in Europe and that the only hope of 
preserving the peace of American nations is to 
avoid the error by which these nations have 
been led astray. Dr. James A. McDonald, of 
Toronto, gave a notable address in Boston re- 
cently in which he plead for a continuance of 
the peaceful policy of great American nations. 
He said: "The greatest achievement of 
America is the joint achievement of her 
two English-speaking nations. That supreme 
achievement which North America can show the 
world is an international boundary line be- 
tween two nations across which in a hundred 
years neither nation ever once launched a men- 
acing army or fired a hostile gun. Think of 
that achievement! A thousand miles up the 
mighty St. Lawrence, a thousand miles along 
the great lakes, a thousand miles across the open 
prairie, a thousand miles over a sea of moun- 
tains — four thousand miles where nation meets 



nation and sovereignty meets sovereignty, but 
never a fortress, never a battleship, never a 
gun, never a sentinel or guard! hour thous- 
and miles of civilized and Christianized inter- 
nationalism — that is North America's greatest 
achievement. ' ' 

That Mormonism is a Menace to the future of 
this great republic is a matter of no sort of 
doubt in the minds of those who are carefully 
watching its growth, and are acquainted with 
its ambitious aims. Referring to their aggress- 
ive propaganda, the Methodist Recorder says : 
' ' The Mormons have something like a thousand 
missionaries abroad among the people of Amer- 
ica, and they are making converts from the 
most devout and pious flocks of Christendom. 
They do not reveal the iniquities of the Mormon 
system, but announce themselves, in high-sound- 
ing phrase as ministers of 'the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter Day Saints,' and proclaim ev- 
erywhere the few doctrines which they hold in 
common with Christians, together with the 
clumsy mysticism which has a peculiar influ- 
ence upon the ignorant. The number of Mor- 
mons has grown from one hundred and forty- 
four thousand to four hundred thousand, in the 
last fourteen years. The whole country has 
been divided by the Mormon elders into mission- 
ary districts, and not a community in all the 
land is spared the baleful influence of this Mo- 
hammedan kingdom in the heart of the repub- 
lic. The political power of the Mormon system 
is out of all proportion to the membership of 
the Mormon Church, and is attaining such mag- 
nitude as to demand the anxious attention of 
the American people. Their missionaries are 
educated, not alone in schools and colleges, but 
especially in the temple at Salt Lake City ; edu- 
cated in craftiness, and in all the subtle arts of 
Mormon diplomacy. America has been too long 
indifferent to this great peril. ' ' 

A Great Earthquake in Italy last week prac- 
tically destroyed a number of the smaller cities. 
It is impossible even several days after the 
event to give an accurate estimate of the full 
extent of damage and loss of life. The dead 
and injured in the Abruzzi alone are said to 
number at least 30,000. The city of Rome es- 
caped with slight injury to buildings and no 
loss of life. Great suffering has ensued as a 
consequence of exposure to cold, besides many 
are trapped in fallen buildings and though un- 
hurt can not escape. Relief work is proceeding 
as rapidly as possible. 



GLIMPSES 

It is refreshing to fall in company with a 
man who has confidence in his f ellowmen. There 

is always sunshine in his soul. 

# # # # 

Greet kindly your fellow, especially if he 
should be in humbler circumsances than you. 
This is the place to get social recognition that is 
worth while. 

It is easy to count that which pleases us as a 
special providence. Job reminds us that we 
may expect to receive evil as well as good at 
the hands of the Lord. 

S "it * .* 

The pure in heart shall see God, not alone in 
the redeemed and disembodied state, but in the 
sanctified state of faithful and loyal obedience 
here. "He that doeth the will of God shall 
know." Only those who have complied with 
the terms are entitled to give testimony as to 

these great truths. 

# # # # 

To be "blameless and harmless, the sons of 
God without rebuke," is the lofty ideal of the 
Christian set up by St. Paul. Such an ideal is 
worth striving for, and it is an open question 
whether we can hold our place among the 
people of God without striving to reach this 
ideal, though it may seem only negative in its 
aspect. 

No greater praise can be accorded any one 
than that which was accorded Enoch when it 
is said that he walked with God. "Two can 
not walk together except they be agreed." 
Enoch had religion just as many men today 
have with the same experience of fellowship. 



Program of the Annual Meeting of the Wo- 
man's Missionary Society, W. N. C. Con- 
ference, Tryon St. Church, Charlotte, 
Jan. 29-Feb. 3 



Friday Afternoon, 3 O'clock 

Executive meeting and conference of District 
Secretaries. 

Friday Evening, 8 O'clock 
Devotional Service — Pastor. 
Greetings. 

President's Message — Mrs. L. H. Robertson. 
Financial Survey — Mrs. P. N. Peacock, Mrs. 
R. L. Hoke. 
Social Hour. 

Saturday Morning 

Devotional Service — Mrs. James Atkins. 
Organization. 

Report of Corresponding Secretary, Foreign 
Department — Mrs. L. W. Crawford. 

Report of Corresponding Secretary, Home 
Department — Mrs. Frank Siler. 

Report of Third Vice-President — Miss Cora 
Earp. 

Report of Fourth Vice-President — Mrs. H. A. 
Dunham. 

Report of Superintendent of Supplies — Mrs. 
J. L. Woltz. 

Report of Superintendent of Publicity — Mrs. 
W. R. Harris. 

Report of Distributor of Literature — Mrs. W. 
C. Houston. 

Noon Hour — Memorial Service — Mrs. Frank 
Siler. 

Saturday Afternoon 

Devotional Service — Miss Frank Miller. 
Reports of District Secretaries. 
Meetings of Committees. 

Saturday Evening 
Reception to Young People at Trinity 
Church. 
Meeting of Committees. 

Sunday 

11 a. m. Sermon — Bishop James Atkins. 

3 p. m. Children's Hour. 

8 p. m. Address — Bishop James Atkins. 

Monday Morning 
Devotional Service — Miss Lelia Tuttle. 
Report of First Vice-President — Mrs. W. S. 
Stewart. 

Two-Minute Reports of Lady Managers. 

Institute on New Form of Organization— 
Mrs. Hume R. Steele, Educational Secretary of 
Board of Missions. 

Address — Mrs. James Atkins. 

Noon Bible Study— Mrs. Hume R. Steele. 
Monday Afternoon 

Devotional Service — Mrs. H. A . Dunham. 

Report of Second Vice-President — Mrs. Plato 
Durham. 

Two-Minute Reports of Young People Dele- 
gates. 

Discussion — Who Has the Larger Opportun- 
ity, the Young Woman Who Goes or the Young 
Woman Who Stays ? — Misses Aleez Aycock and 
Helen Weaver, Greensboro College for Women. 

Unfinished Reports. 

Monday Evening 

Our Fields— Mrs. Hume R. Steele, Miss Le- 
lia Tuttle. 

Tuesday Morning 

Devotional Service — Miss Terrie Buttrick. 

Reports of City Mission Boards — Asheville, 
Winston-Salem. 

Report of Committee on Social Service. 

Discussion— The Need and Method of Co- 
operation between Church and State in Social 
Service — Mr. W. R. Lynch, Welfare Worker, 
Spray, N. C. 

Report of Committee on Extension of Work. 

Discussion — Correlation of the Missionary 
Forces of the Church — Rev. Frank Siler, Con- 
ference Missionary Secretary. 

Pledging for the Conference. 

Noon Hour of Intercession for World Peace 
— Leader, Mrs. Hume R. Steele. 

Tuesday Afternoon 

Devotional Service. 

Unfinished Reports. 

Election of Officers. 

Place of next meeting. 

Tuesday Evening 

Closing Session. 

Executive Meeting. 



Page Four 



NOETH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 21, 1915 



| CONTRIBUTIONS | 

THE FINANCIAL SIDE OF TITHING 

By Thomas Kane 

Say the critics: "Advocacy of tithing be- 
cause it brings financial gain to the tither is 
appealing to a low, a sordid motive." Is it? 
Do they propose to give lessons in motive to 
the Almighty ? Is it not God who says : ' ' Hon- 
or the Lord with thy substance, so shall thy 
barns be filled with plenty ? ' ' Does he not also 
say in Malichi 3:10, "Bring ye all the tithes 
into the store house and prove me now herewith 
if I will not pour you out a blessing until there 
shall not be room enough to receive it," In 
the next two verses he tells them what kind 
of blessings they will receive for tithing. ' ' And 
I will rebuke the devourer for your sakes and 
he shall not destroy the fruits of your ground, 
neither shall your vine cast her fruit before 
the time in the field. . . . And all nations shall 
call you blessed for ye shall be a delightsome 
land saith the Lord of hosts." Are these not 
temporal blessigs ? If not, what are they ? Does 
not God here promise good crops and no blight 
on the fruit, in short, financial prosperity as a 
reward for tithing? If not, what do these 
promises mean? Are they not the equivalent of 
what we would say in modern English "tith- 
ing pays the tither; try it and see?" 

The words "tithe," "tithes" and "tith- 
ing" occur in the Bible 36 times. The 
"tenth" occurs 67 times. In 36 of these it has 
reference to the proportion in "offerings." In 
every instance where rewards are mentioned 
they are temporal, financial. The record does 
not show that the Jewish nation was ever 
prosperous when the people failed to tithe. 
It does show that when the people paid their 
tithes the nation was prosperous. 

Of course there were other causes both for 
prosperity and adversity. Tithing is not ev- 
erything, but I submit that the Bible plainly 
teaches that there is a very close, I might al- 
most say, a cause and effect relation between 
tithing and temporal prosperity. 

The question is often asked : "If tithing 
is so important why did not Jesus say more 
about it?" Is the Sabbath important? Can 
you find in His teaching any stronger endorse- 
ment of the law of the Sabbath than of the 
law of the tithe? Can you find any as 
strong? Is the church important? Christ 
never mentioned church but once and then in 
a passage of very difficult and, as every schol- 
ar knows, of very doubtful interpretation. 
Christ's teaching in all the four gospels is sat- 
urated with the "Kingdom." The words 
"Kingdom of Heaven" and "Kingdom of God" 
were ever upon His lips. Keeping the Sabbath, 
paying tithes, worshiping in church, observing 
the sacraments, all are important, but all are 
means to an end. The end is the building up 
of the Kingdom of Heaven first in our own 
hearts and then helping to build it up in the 
hearts of others. 

The Jews were tithers and are yet. Are they 
not financially prosperous? Do you ever hear 
of them begging for money to support their 
churches and charities as we Christians do? 

A few years ago a supply of pamphlets on 
tithing was sent to a converted Jewish Rabbi in 
New York who was preaching to a congrega- 
tion of converted Jews. In his letter of thanks 
to the sender he stated that he had given the 
package to a neighboring pastor as his people 
did not need teaching in tithing. He said they 
had been tithers as Jews and they continued 
to tithe as Christians. 

In a recent letter from a Methodist pastor 
in a small city in Pennsylvania, he says : "I 
preached on tithing last Sunday morning to 
about 400 people. A Jew who heard my ser- 
mon said to me: "Mr. there are only 

thirteen Jewish families in this city, yet we 
keep the expenses of our church clear and pay 
our ministers $80.00 per month. "We simply 
tithe." 

The numbers and power of Mormonism is 
due to tithing more than to all other causes 
combined. Does tithing make the members of 



the Mormon church poor ? Are they not fi- 
nancially prosperous? The success of Dowie- 
ism is due to the same cause. The immense 
industries at Zion City were all built up by 
tithes. It is safe to say that but for tithing 
neither Mormonism or Dowieism would have 
lasted ten years after the death of their found- 
ers. 

A much fairer, as well as more relevant illus- 
tration of what tithing will accomplish in and 
for a denomination is afforded by the Seventh 
Day Adventists. There is nothing specially at- 
tractive, no special drawing power in observing 
the seventh instead of the first day of the week 
as the Sabbath of rest and worship. The Ad- 
ventists are neither alone or singular in their 
belief in the Second coming of Christ. Mr. 
Moody and the late Dr. Gordon of Boston de- 
voutly believed that Christ would come again. 
So do thousands of Christians in all of churches. 
Except by their faith in and practice of tithing, 
how can we account for the remarkable showing 
made by the Seventh Day Adventists as a de- 
nomination ? They regard the law of the tithe, 
the tenth of income, as equally binding with 
the law of the Sabbath, the seventh of time. 

Their official reports state that in 1870 they 
had a membership of 5,440. In 1910 it was 
104,526. Their annual tithe in 1870 was $2.- 
182.46. In 1910 $1,338,689.65. In 1913 it was 
$1,771,989.60. In 1870 the church controlled 
one sanitarium with 35 employees. In 1910 
they had 74 sanitariums with 1989 employees 
with assets of $3,368,000. In 1880 their total 
contributions to missions and other benevolent 
causes was $5.39 per capita. In 1910 it was 
$21.27. In 1913 $23.42. This included the 
membership in foreign countries. In North 
America alone it was $28.93 per capita for 71, 
863 communicants. These figures certainly 
do not show that they had grown poor by 
tithing during the 33 years from 1880 to 1913. 

Evanston, 111. 

FOREIGN SPECIALS IN WESTERN N. C. 
CONFERENCE 
Missionaries 

Rev. S. A. Stewart, Hiroshima, Japan, Main 
Street Church, Thomasville, $600; Rev. N. S. 
Ogburn, Jr., Uwajima, Japan, S. S. Trinity 
Church, Charlotte, $700; Rev. John C. Hawk, 
Changchow, China, First Church, Salisbury, 
$600; Rev. J. A. G. Shipley, Shanghai, China, 
Main Street Church, Reidsville, $600; Dr. Jno. 
A. Snell, Soochow, China, "West End Church, 
Winston-Salem, $600; Rev. F. S. Love, Juiz 
de Fora, Brazil, First Church, Hickory, $600; 
Dr. D. L. Mumpower, Wembo-Niama, Africa, 
Dr. J. W. Long, Greensboro, $500 ; Rev. M. M. 
Marshall, Isle of Pines, Cuba, Central Church, 
Mount Airy, $700 ; Rev. M. B. Stokes, Wonsan, 
Korea, Church, Hendersonville, $600; Rev. L. 
P. Anderson, Songdo, Korea, Church, Lenoir, 
$600; Rev. W. G. Cram Songdo, Korea, Tryon 
Street Church, Charlotte, $1,300; Miss Gilber- 
ta Harris, Ivey Hospital, Songdo, Korea, Wash- 
ington Street, High Point, $600; Rev. F. K. 
Gamble, Songdo, Korea, Sunday Schools Sal- 
isbury District, $600; Dr. E. W. Anderson, 
Choon Chun, Korea, Church, Newton, $600; 
Dr. E. W. Anderson, Choon Chun, Korea, 
Church, Morganton, $600; Rev. N. S. Ogburn, 
Jr., Uwajima, Japan, Central Church, Monroe, 
$600 ; Rev. A. C. Bowen, Soochow, China, Sun- 
day schools Statesville District, . . . . ; Rev. W. 
A. Wilson, Okayama, Japan, Main Street 
Church, Gastonia, $600. Central Church, 
Asheville, and Centary, Winston, eacch raised 
Asheville, and Centenary, Winston, each raised 

Native Preachres 

China 

Zau Fi Bang, Huchow District, Leicester 
Circuit, (Women and Sunday schools), $100; 
Fong Nyoh Ling, Huchow District, Haywood 
Street Church, Asheville, $100; Zau Hsiang 
Zie, Huchow District, Sunday school, Crabtree, 
Haywood Circuit, $100; Zau Yong Dong, Hu- 
chow District, Sunday school, Mt. Zion Church, 
Haywood Circuit, $100. 

Japan 

Rev. Y. Miyahara, Nakatsu Circuit, Second 
Bible Class, Polkton, $168 ; Rev. S. Niwa, Kobe, 
Baraca Class, West End Church, Winston-Sa- 



lem, $180; Rev. S. Kudo, Yanai and Oshima 
Circuit, Sunday school, Franklin, $100; Rev. 
M. Watanabe, Saiki, Matsuyama District, Dr. 
W. J. Weaver, Asheville, R. F. D., $150. 

Korea 

You Si-Kook, Seoul District, Sunday school, 
Hickory, $100 ; Cho Chung Whan, Choon Chun 
District, S. S. Missionary Society, Greensboro, 
West Market Street Church, $100; Ye Syek- 
Kwen, Seoul District, Sunday school Wishing- 
ton Street Church, High Point, $100; Pak 
Yang Wha, Wonsan District, Mr. Chas. H. 
Drum, Catawba, $100; No assignment, Dr. and 
Mrs. Lewis W. Elias, Biltmore, $100 ; Kim Kui 
Soon, Song District, North Asheville Sunday 
school, $100; No Moon Kyeng, Choon Chun 
District, Tryon Street Sunday School, $100; 
Choi Hyeng-Chin, Songdo District, Loves Sun- 
day school, Walkertown, $100; Kim Syeng Ku, 
Choon Chun District, S. S. class, Mt. Olivet 
Church, Davidson Circuit, Lexington, $100. 
Circuits 

Sungkiang, Shanghai District, China, Mr. 
M. D. Shook, Leicester, $100;Wusih, Soochow 
District, China, ^Sunday school, Marion, $200 ; 
Changshu, Soochow Dictrict, China, Mr. M. D. 
Stockton, Winston-Salem, $72 ; Taehang, Shang- 
hai District, China, Triplett Church, Moores- 
ville Circuit, $100; East Soochow, Soochow 
District, China, Church, Asheboro, $400; East 
Changchow, Soochow District, China, Central 
Church, Shelby, $400; Sungkiang, Shanghai 
District, China, S. S. Main Street Church, 
Reidsville, $100; Po Chun, Seoul District, Ko- 
rea, Granite Falls Charge, Granite Falls and 
Hudson, $250; Yunk Pyeng, Seoul District, 
Korea, Church, Lincolnton, $136 ; Po Chun Cir- 
cuit, Seoul District, Korea, Trinity Church, 
Randolph Circuit, $100; Kim Wha Circuit, 
Seoul District, Korea, Church, Spencer, $200; 
Pootung, Shanghai District, China, Central 
Church, Albemarle, $400. 
Miscellaneous 

Bible Woman, Japan, Mrs. John S. Roth 
and daughter, Elkin, $60; Mrs. Pak, Bible 
Woman, Korea, M. D. Stockton, Winston-Sa- 
]em, $60; Sscholarships, Lambuth Memorial 
School, Kobe, Japan, West Market Street Sun- 
day school Missionary Society, Greensboro, $75 ; 
Bed, Soochow Hospital, China, Bethel Sunday 
school, Asheville, $25; Scholarship, Huchow 
District School, China, Epworth League, Ma- 
rion, $25 ; Evangelistic Work, Seoul District, 
Korea, Mrs. H. H. Hayes, Trinity, Randolph 
Circuit, (Presbyterian), $120; Scholarship, Hir- 
oshima Girls' School, Japan, S. S. Spring Gar- 
den Street, Greensboro, $50; Africa, Epworth 
Leagues of the Western North Carolina Con- 
ference, $300. Total, $14,846. 

November 24, 1914. 



MISSIONARIES, BIBLE WOMEN AND 
SCHOLARSHIPS SUPPORTED BY 
THE W. M. S. OF. THE W. 
N. C. CONFERENCE 

Missionaries 

Miss Helen Richardson, China, West Mar- 
ket Street Church, Greensboro, N. C, $750; 
Miss Nina Troy, China, Margaret Foster So- 
ciety of West Market Street Church, Greens- 
boro, $750; Miss Fannie Burkhead, China, 
Central Church, Asheville, $750; Miss Lelia 
Tuttle, China, Central Church, Concord, $750; 
Mrs. Josephine Campbell, Tryon Street Church, 
Charlotte, $750; Miss Blanche Howell, Brazil, 
Circle of Thirty in Conference Society, $750. 
Total, 6. 

Bible Women 

Ella Haver Dunham, China, Haywood 
Street, (Mrs. Dunham), $60; Nina Bell Norhey, 
Korea, Calvary Auxiliary, Charlotte, $60 ; Fan- 
nie Robinson, China, Harrison Auxiliary, $60; 
Fannie E. Bagby, China, High Point Aux- 
iliary, $60; Frances Bumpass, Korea, West 
Market Auxiliary, $60 ; Maude McNeer, Korea, 
Elkin Auxiliary, $60; Alice Cheatham, China, 
Elkin Sunday school, $60; Annie Phillips Bis- 
aner, Korea, Hickory Auxiliary, $60; Louise 
Wilson, China, Lenoir Auxiliary, $60; Kannie 
Marr, China, West End Auxiliary, $60; Mary 
Ardrey Bell, China, J. A. Bell and sisters, $60. 
Total, 11. 



January 21, 1915 



NOETH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Five 



Scholarships 

Bessie Allen, Korea, Hendersonville Juniors, 
$40; Virginia Boshamer, Mexico, Wadesboro 
Auxiliary, $40; Eva Shute Ingram, Mexico, 
Monroe Juniors, $40; Monroe Phifer, Mexico, 
Monroe Juniors, $40; Ethel Durant, Brazil, 
Trinity Juniors, $40; Ethel Durant, Korea, 
Trinity Juniors, $40; Hazel Robinson, Korea, 
Tryon Street Juniors, $40; Martha Glasscock, 
Korea, Greensboro Centenary Auxiliary, $40; 
Guadalope Leal, Mexico, Willing Workers 
(West Market), $40; Mary McNary Taylor, 
Cuba, Centenary Y. P., (Greensboro), $40; 
Margaret Smith, Korea, Elkin Juniors, $40; 
Olive Pink, China, Mt. Olivet Auxiliary, $40; 
Lucy Marion Crawford, Mexico, Concord Cen- 
tral Juniors, $40; Mary Hudson, Korea, Shel- 
by Juniors, $40; Sue Stevens Howard, Korea, 
West End Auxiliary, $40 ; Margie Yarborough, 
Brazil, Lexington Juniors, $40. Total, 15. 
Deaconesses 

Miss Blackwell, Winston- Salem, $600; Miss 
Guffin, Asheville, supported by the Women's 
City Boards, $600. 



THE CONFEDERATE SOLDIER AND 
PROF. G. W. HAHN 

At each annual reunion the decrease in num- 
ber tells how fast the Confederate soldiers are 
passing away. If gushing speeaches and mon- 
uments would make us all happy we would be, 
as it were, in a revival all the time. We do all 
enjoy good sincere speeches and we do appre- 
ciate monuments, when they come from people 
who love the old comrades. We all like kind 
words of sympathy, but there are many old 
veterans and families of fallen Confederates 
who are in need of more substantial help. 

As far as I am individually concerned, I have 
never received a penny of pension, and will be 
very much surprised if I ever do. ' ' Blessed are 
they who 'spect nothing, they shall not be 
'spinted." 

Judge Clark, in several of his speeches, has 
stated from facts and figures that North Caro- 
lina, (not to mention other Southern States), 
has paid to the United States Pension Fund 
since the war many millions of dollars. He 
gives this fact as one reason for advocating the 
placing of the few remaining Confederates on 
the U. S. Pension Roll. Some patriotic Con- 
federates have said that they would not accept 
it if it was offered to them. However, there 
are many who would accept it as a matter of 
justice and right, since our people have helped 
so largely to create the fund. Don 't get alarm- 
ed, my comrades, there is no danger of it being 
offered to us. The best way of all would be 
for North Carolina to pension her Confeder- 
ates. That would be the very best speech and 
monument that could be given them. 

Mr. Editor, excuse me, I have gotten away 
from my subject. Perhaps my introduction 
will be longer than my communication. 
Prof. G. W. Hahn 

Comrade Hahn was a Confederate soldier 
and was severely wounded. Nearly fifty years 
after the war he undertook to write a history 
or sketch of every soldier from Catawba coun- 
ty. He discovered that the work should have 
been done thirty years sooner, so many had 
passed away and it was hard to get the people 
interested enough to furnish the necessary in- 
formation. People are willing to commend 
the veterans, but when it comes to lending a 
helping hand it is different. It sounds mighty 
good to hear some one say, ' ' Go it, Prof. Hahn, 
may you have great success," but it is much 
better when it is backed up by a helping hand. 

Comrade Hahn published a splendid book 
under the circumstances. The truth is it is 
excellent and should be in every home in Ca- 
tawba County. Confederate soldiers, (if they 
are financially able) should give copies of this 
book to their children. The book has 385 
pages and the short dedicatory tribute to the 
comrades' widows, mothers and children of 
our country, by the author, is worth the price 
of the book. Comrade Hahn has several hun- 
dred copies of the book left unsold. He is in 
trouble, my friend, and now is the time to 
help him. Go to work and help sell the books, 
and thereby aid our comrade who §ays he is 
''Down and out," 



I desire to thank Dr. J. L. Murphy for 
his interest in the matter, and also to thank 
the newspapers for publishing his letters. Let 
every patriotic man and woman in Catawba 
County sell one or more copies of the book. 
Friend, leave off some Christmas present and 
invest the money in this book. 

The failure in the book must not be attrib- 
uted to the author, but to the people who failed 
to furnish him the information. I will agree 
to sell at least one dozen copies. Who will 
follow this example? Don't all speak at once 
but write to Prof. G. W. Hahn, Hickory, N. C, 
and lend a helping hand. 

The towns in our county should purchase 
this book for the nice things said of them. 

Miles O. Sherrill, 
Late of Co. A, 12th N. C. Regiment, War of 

1861:65. 



GROWTH OF METHODISM 
Luminous Cloud in Front 

Rev. C. F. Sherrill 

Our last Conference showed the growth of 
Methodism in 1914. The ark of the covenent is 
in our midst. The luminous cloud leads. We 
now have about 100,000 members in this half 
of the state. Ministers on the roll, 258 ; preach- 
ers in .process of joining the Conference, 22 ; 
local preachers on charges, 23 ; local preachers, 
196 ; members, 99, 471, a grand total member- 
ship of 99,947. For missions last year we 
raised $48,577. There were 9,385 additions 
to the church. For ministerial support $211,- 
808.00 was raised. The grand total raised for 
all purposes was over half a million dollars — 
$584,652.00. 

Four Year Men 

Twenty-two men are in their fourth year, 
by districts as follows: Asheville, 1; Greens- 
boro, 1; Charlotte, 2; Mt. Airy, 2; North 
Wilkesboro, 1 ; Salisbury, 2 ; Shelby, 1 ; States- 
ville, 2; Waynesville, 3; Winston, 4. Pre- 
siding in their fourth year, L. T. 
Mann and L. T. Cordell. On stations, R. S. 
Howie, T. F. Marr, R. D. Sherrill, W. H. 
Willis, Parker Holmes, J. W. Moore, W. M. 
Biles, A. W. Plyler, G. D. Herman, E. L. 
Bain, W. L. Hutchins, eleven in number. 
Nine on circuits — C. M. Carpenter, J. E. Woos- 
lev, Seymour Taylor, A. R. Surratt, W. T. 
Albright, W. T. TJsrey, J. L. Teague, D. R. 
proffit, C. M. Short — twenty in all. 

Salaries Paid 

The salary includes a furnished house. Try- 
on St., Charlotte, leads the Conference, paying 
the pastor last year, $3,000.00. The following 
pay $2,500 : Central, Asheville ; Trinity, Char- 
lotte; West Market, Greensboro; Centenary, 
Winston. 

Sixty-nine charges pay $1,000.00 and over. 
Seven charges pay $1,500.00. Two pay $1,800.- 
00. Four paid $2,000.00. 

Charlotte district paid the presiding elder 
the largest salary — $2,458.00. Statesville dis- 
trict next with $2,328.00. Salisbury, $2,216.- 
00. Winston, $2,214. 

Districts Leading in Missionary Contributions 

Greensboro raised $4,693 ; Charlotte, $4,552 ; 
Asheville, $3,279 ; Salisbury, $2,797. 

The Districts 

For missions : — Greensboro raised $4,693 ; 
Charlotte, $4,552 ; Asheville, $3,279 ; Salisbury, 
$2,795. 

For all purposes : — Greensboro, $87,625 ; 
Charlotte, $86,555; Winston, $78,137; Salis- 
bury, $61,876. 

Membership of the Districts 

Charlotte, 12,320; Statesville, 12,113; Win- 
ston, 11,450. 

Gain in Membership 

Charlotte, 1,207; Winston, 1,189; Salisbury 
1,186. 



Not what we think or say, but what we do, 
will have its effect upon the world. Let, there- 
fore, the thinker do and the doer think. — Rob 
Roy McNulty. 



If you want to be miserable, think about 
yourself, about what you want- what you like, 
what respect people ought to pay you, and what 
people think of you.-=Charles Kingsley, 



SONG OF THE ANGELS 

E. L. Stamey 

Above the lone Judean hills, 
The humble shepherds heard 

A song that earth and heaven fills, 
A song by time endeared. 

That song the choir celestial sang 

Upon that starlit night, 
With hope and joy triumphal rang, 
Mid scenes divinely bright. 

The promised Christ had come to earth. 

In lowly manger lay 
The virgin's babe of holy birth, 

The Lord, the truth, the way. 

Angelic song, O may we sing, 
This happy Christmas time! 

May peace on earth its music bring 
To every land and clime. 

(The foregoing little sonnet was intended 
for our Christmas edition, but was, by some 
means, overlooked in the make-up. — Editor.) 



A SUCCESSFUL YEAR 

Last year when I was appointed to Severance 
Union Medical College in Seoul the Depart- 
ment of Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat was assign- 
ed to our Mission. This work had never been 
organized and it was an open question as to 
what were its possibilities. The clinic includes 
the work done in the college building and in 
the hospital. The clinic attendance in our de- 
partment alone for the year has approximated 
15,000 ; and out of this clinic we have collected 
in fees one-third of all the money collected 
by the institution in all its clinic departments, 
there being seven in number. The optical de- 
partment had existed in a nominal way before 
our occupancy, but it had been operated at a 
loss to the institution. The first seven months 
of our superintendence this department 
alone showed a net profit of $1,000. The mail 
order service has been extended for the bene- 
fit of the mission hospitals over the country, 
and during the year we have furnished 396 
pairs of spectacles on doctors' prescriptions, 
which, of course, does not include the regular 
sales of spectacles. The evangelistic work has 
been conducted along systematic lines accord- 
ing to a fixed program, whereby all who have 
been engaged in college and hospital have been 
afforded an opportunity of doing personal 
work. Approximately 30,000 people have 
heard the gospel at our hands this year, and 
18,000 of this number have been through our 
department of the institution. — N. H. Bowman, 
Seoul, Korea. 



So far the European war is not especially 
disturbing us, but the people are fearing that 
business will suffer. The silk business is even 
now suffering, and prices are low. But this 
year rice is considerably cheaper than usual, 
and that is a great help to the multitudes of 
the poor. — J. L. Hendry, Huchow, China. 



A Very Encouraging Note comes from a 
Methodist missionary who has been working: in 
Italy for twenty-five years. He says: "It is 
very significant that the people in Italy are 
flocking to the churches everywhere, both Pro- 
testant and Roman Catholic. Even men of 
high social and government positions are turn- 
ing their attention to spiritual things, driven 
by this experience of bloodv slaughter which 
comes home to millions of families the length 
and breadth of Europe. A wave of religious 
faith is sweeping over all the people. After the 
war is ended, I believe that one result of the 
conflict will be the moral and spiritual trans- 
formation of the entire continent." 



The courier has just arrived from Lusambo 
and brings Word that transportation between 
Boma and Antwerp is cut off, so I don't know 
when you will receive this. I hope you will 
not feel at all uneasy about us, for there is 
not the slightest danger. T have no idea that 
the Belgian officers in the Congo will be with- 
drawn, but even if they are we have too many 
friends among the natives for us to be in aT>v 
danger from others who may not be so frV T* 
ly. — J. A. Stockwell, Wembo-Niama, Af r';- \ 



Page Six NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE January 21, 1915 



INTERESTING NEWS FROM FIELD 



NOTES AND PERSONALS 

— Be sure to read page 16. 

— Rev. Frank Siler's Field Notes, coming in 
late, had to take chances, so they appear on 
page 10. 

— Revs. C. M. Pickens and E. L. Bain were 
pleasant visitors to the Advocate office on Wed- 
nesday of last week. 

— We regret missing the call of Rev. H. H. 
Robbins on Thursday of last week. Brother 
Robbins was in the city visiting relatives. 

— We regret to learn through the papers that 
Rev. W. G. Mallonee, of Black Mountain, is 
very ill at his home in that place. We have no 
particulars. 

— We print elsewhere a form of petition for 
Sunday schools and other organizations to use 
in petitioning our Legislature in behalf of tem- 
perance legislaton. 

— The Locust correspondent of the Albemarle 
Times of last week says : ' ' Rev. Mr. Hughes, the 
new Methodist minister, made a lasting impres- 
sion on his audience Sunday at his first sermon. 

— A delegation from Greensboro called on 
President Wilson last week and invited him to 
deliver the address at Guilford Battle Ground 
on the 4th of July. It is hoped that he may 
accept the invitation. 

— Miss Earle Shell and Mr. Lester Thornton, 
were happily married at the residence of the 
bride's sister, Mrs. J. A. Hardin, Hickory, N. 
C, on Tuesday evening of last week. Rev. 
A. L. Stanford, pastor of First Church, offici- 
ated. 

— By some means we made a mistake in pub- 
lishing the Missionary Institute for North 
Wilkesboro District. This institute was held at 
North Wilkesboro December 18-20. We very 
much regret this error, and hope nobody was 
mislead by it. 

— Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Paddison, of Mount 
Airy, passed through the city on Thursday of 
last week on their way to Memphis, Tenn., 
where they will spend some two or three months 
visiting their sons. We regret missing the call 
at the Advocate office. 

— Rev. Dr. C. W. Byrd and family are now 
very comfortably domiciled in the elegant new 
parsonage which the congregation recently pur- 
chased on West Market Street. This new home 
is located on the lot formerly occupied by the 
church, and is one of the best preacher's homes 
in the Conference. 

— Miss Clara Bell Foy, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. E. C. Foy, of Mount Airy, was happily 
married to Mr. Alexander Lillington Clarke, of 
Roanoke Rapids, on Tuesday evening of last 
week. The ceremony took place at the residence 
of the bride 's parents and was performed by the 
pastor, Rev. W. H. Willis. 

— Rev. T. A. Groce requests us to thank the 
following for contributions to the Pisgah 
church fund i F. M. Weaver, Asheville, $10.00 ; 
Haywood Street S. S., $1.00 ; Mrs. S. E. Green- 
wood, Mills River, $1.00 ; Mount Morenci S. S., 
$1.00 ; Acton S. S., $1.00. Brother Groce, while 
thanking these, still hopes others will respond to 
his call. 

— The report from our work at Davidson, 
Rev. D. F. Carver, pastor, deserves special no- 
tice. The fact stated that the children all re- 
main for the church service is an achievement 
worthy of emulation in every charge. We can 
not disassociate this from the other fact stated 
that Brother Carver has a Junior League and 
is catechising the children. We commend the 
example to all pastors. 

— During the Conference on Evangelism re- 
cently held in Nashville, Rev. Walter Holcomb, 
who is doing general evangelistic work, and 
Rev. Jerry Jeter, who is Conference Evangelist 
of East Oklahoma Conference, met and formed 
an evangelistic party for the coming year. Mr. 
Si ter will have charge of the music, and give 
illustrated chalk talks, in some of the meetings 
that Mr. Holcomb will hold this year. 



— The editor of the Advocate spent Sunday 
with Rev. T .B. Johnson on the Summerfield 
charge, preaching at Summerfield in the morn- 
ing and at the Battleground in the afternoon. 
The day was inclement and the congregations 
comparatively small. Notwithstanding the dis- 
agreeable weather we had very enjoyable ser- 
vices and the emphasis given to Advocate Day 
brought some renewals and new subscribers. 
Brother Johnson is in high favor with his peo- 
ple and is looking forward to a year of progress. 



Shelby Circuit — Rev. A. J. Burrus, the new 
pastor, writes very encouragingly of the 
work. He says : ' ' We have been very kindly 
received on our new charge, have been given 
a most liberal pounding by our South Shelby 
congregation,; and a nice box of supplies by our 
Sharon congregation. The people of Shel- 
by are very.;kind to us. We extend to all 
our thanks." 



Carraway Memorial — We have just closed a 
protracted meeting. A great number professed 
conversion. Many people gave their names as 
applicants for church membership, and many 
backslidden church members have been reclaim- 
ed. Rev. D. II. Comann, of Lincolnton, N. C, 
the Conference General Evangelist, did all the 
preaching in his own iminitable style. 

A. R. Bell. 



Sylva — The Jackson County Journal last 
week had the following interesting item : 

At the quarterly conference Sunday evening, 
it was definately decided that the Methodists of 
Sylva will erect a handsome new church build- 
ing of modern type. A building committee 
consisting of the board of stewards, the pas- 
tor and E. L. McKee, T. O. Wilson, Theo 
Buchanan, J. H. Cathey and Dr. C. Z . Candler 
was appointed . The committee will get to bus- 
iness at once and the work on the new building 
will be started in the near future. The new 
building which will be of brick will be erected 
on the site of the present church on the corner 
of Church and Walnut streets and will cost 
approximately $8,000.00. 



Salem Circuit — Rev. A. L. Coburn, the pas- 
tor, writes : ' ' Through the kindness of Broth- 
er Will Widenhouse, we left Ep worth and 
Center folks (all as good people as I have ever 
served and loved) and landed at Salem par- 
sonage November 24th. Found no one there 
and things torn up ready for ' the painter. 
They came two days. later and painted the in- 
side of the parsonage and it is truly a nice 
job. The people have been coming to see us 
and our living has cost us comparatively lit- 
tle. The good things still last. Brother Ware, 
our presiding elder, held our first quarterly 
meeting a week ago, preaching two good ser- 
mons. We had a pleasant conference. The 
preacher's salary was increased and we expect 
to have a good year." 



Stokesdale Circuit — We arrived at Stokes- 
dale on the 3rd of December, but finding the 
parsonage still occupied by Brother G. W. Wil- 
liams, my predecessor, we were carried by our 
good people to the hotel and there we remained 
for a week, feasting on fried chicken, etc. We 
are comfortably housed in the parsonage, which 



is one of the best in the Mt. Airy District. 
And only a few days ago the kind people of 
our little town came to the parsonage and gave 
us an "old-fashioned pounding," for which we 
are indeed thankful. Such kind treatment as 
this brings us to the conclusion that "The lines 
are fallen unto us in pleasant places." May 
the Lord's blessings rest upon these good peo- 
ple. And we are praying daily that the Lord 
may use us wonderfully in leading the sinners 
on this charge to the Master. 

Thos. J. Folger. 



From Sulphur Springs — For the past week 
we have been engaged in a slorious revival at 
Mt. Morenci church. So far there has not been 
such a large ingathering but a genuine revival 
in the church. When the Holy Spirit is with 
you and a revivalist like Brother E. M. Hoyle 
to do the preaching, things must move, after 
a week of prayer and sacrifice. At the Sunday 
evening service Brother Hoyle preached a mis- 
sionary sermon and pledges amounting to $368 
were received. Now we are expecting larger 
things throughout this week. Pray for us. 

Yours, T. A. Groce. 



Thermal City— We left the kind people at 
Mill Spring, whom we had' served for two 
years, on Nov. 26, 1914, and arrived at Ther- 
mal City the same day and was given a cordial 
reception. I am making my second round on 
my work. I find a kind, receptive people at 
all the churches. Our first quarterly confer- 
ence convened at Pisgah Jan. 2-3, with Rev. 
J. E. Gay, our presiding elder, in the chair. 
He transacted the business of the ouarterly 
conference in his business-like way. The kind 
people of Thermal City and vicinity on the 
eve of Dec. 24th gave us a pounding such 
as never does make preachers and their fam- 
ilies feel grouchy nor long-faced. Yet I wish 
to say that it has not been one. but a contin- 
uous pounding. I wish in this way to ex- 
press to some extent my appreciation. May 
the good Lord abundantly bless in body and 
soul each participant and by His grace and 
Spirit prepare me for a service that will in 
some degree merit such tokens of love and 
sympathy. Fraternally, 

J. C. Richardson. 



Randolph Circuit — My family and I arrived 
at Trinity the day before Thanksgiving and 
were met at the depot and parsonage by a 
number of elect ladies and some of the no- 
ble brethren, and found everything in order 
and as warm a welcome as was necessary to 
make a preacher and family feel that they 
were among the salt of the earth. Many acts 
of kindness and appreciation since that day 
have been in evidence of their high esteem of 
those who live in the parsonage. Even those 
who are members of other churches, that live 
here, have done much by word and deed to 
make it comfortable for us. They have not 
only opened their doors to us but their pocket- 
books as well. I am sure no better people can 
be found anywhere. This is one of the best 
parsonages in the Conference. I have not 
preached at one church yet, and have not vis- 
ited a great deal in the country yet as the 
weather has been so unfavorable for travel. 
However, I have visited sixty homes. Some 
of the churches have raised the salary about 
twenty per cent., and perhaps the othejs will 
do likewise. The people hear the preaching 
gladly, and I see we have made progress al- 
ready. The Woman's Foreign Missionary So- 
ciety observed week of prayer and self-denial 
last week and I hear splendid reports from 
them. The outlook is fine for good revivals, 
and in fact, for the best year this charge has 
ever had. Many good things are said of the 
faithful work of Brother Raper. 

May the Lord help me to be a wise and 
faithful leader of this so great a people. 

E. N. Crowder. 



From Davidson — I am always glad to get 
my copy and read the news from the field; 
but somehow I never see anything from Da- 
vidson, so I take pleasure in writing just a few 
lines to let you know how we are getting along. 
We are improving on all lines. We think a 
great deal of our pastor, Brother Carver. He 
is doing good work. We have good attend- 
ance at both church service and Sunday school. 
We have Sunday school at 10 o'clock and 
preaching at 11 and the children all stay for 
the church service. We have also two Leagues 
and they are doing a great work. The Senior 
League had an oyster supper at Mrs. Shoemak- 
ers Thursday night, and made about $10. The 
president, Brother Cleveland Hager, seems to 
be at work. His League carries two shares in 
Building and Loan, and the membership has 
increased by ten new members in the last two 



January 21, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Seven 



Sundays. The Junior League, led by Miss 
Callie Christenberry, is doing excellent work 
and Brother Carver has introduced the Junior 
Catechism in the Junior League. The Junior 
and Senior Leagues have twelve barrels rolling 
over town in behalf of the Orphan's Home. 
Our Missionary Committee is making the every 
member canvass and is meeting with much suc- 
cess, so I think our church at Davidson is 
doing a great work, and may the Lord guide 
and direct us in larger fields of usefulness. 

Everett Torrence. 



Burkhead, Winston-Salem — The Sentinel of 
January 14th, says: 

A large congregation assembled at Burkhead 
church last night to enjoy the old-time love- 
feast. A happier looking congregation would 
be hard to find. The pastor made a very happy 
address, taking as his subject "Burkhead," 
which he discussed under five different beads — 
Lurkhead, Murkhead, Jerkhead, Shirkhead and 
Workhead. His speech was interspersed with 
wit, humor, pathos, commendation and appeal, 
and was greatly enjoyed by all present. 

Mr. A. M. Craig, secretary of the Y. M. C. 
A., made a short talk, expressing his pleasure 
at being present and his appreciation of the 
splendid work being done by Burkhead. He 
said that when he first came to the city the 
pastor of Burkhead church was one of the first 
men in the city to meet him and tender him 
his services in aiding the work of the Y. M. 
C. A. ; that he had called upon him in seas- 
on and out, and that every promise of assist- 
ance made had been kept to the letter. 

Mr. R. E. Carmichael, chairman of the board 
of stewards, outlined the plans and purposes of 
Burkhead for the coming year. Rev. P. B. 
Abbott congratulated the congregation upon 
its accomplishment. His message was one of 
cheer and good will and was duly appreciated. 

Other short talks were made, and then sugar 
cake and coffee were served and the meeting 
took on a delightfully social aspect in which 
there was no place or chance for grouch or 
gloom. 

After the social season, the Doxology was 
sung, the meeting dismissed, and all went away 
glad in their hearts that they had been pres- 
ent, and sincerely hoping that they might at 
some future time be present at a similar meet- 
ing. 



Morganton District Institute 

The Morganton District Missionary Institute 
which embraced the 13th and 14th inst., was a 
splendid success in every particular. The 
preachers and laymen, with Drs. Siler and Mc- 
Larty, made it so. The attendance was good, 
especially considering the extreme bad weather 
preceding for weeks past. However, the 
weather during the session was most excellent. 
Bishop Atkins and Dr. Byrd failed to reach 
us, but their places were admirably filled by 
the preachers and laymen of the district. The 
institute did our people great good, and es- 
pecially so since we have just gotten into our 
new church. Impressions were made that will 
abide all time to come. I held the good breth- 
ren on the district in high esteem, but com- 
ing in contact with them and hearing their 
excellent speeches enlarged my personal 
esteem and opinion of these most splendid 
servants of God. They also made a fine im- 
pression on our people. Brother Gay has his 
district well manned by a fine set of preachers 
— not a mediocro among them — which speaks 
well for Brother Gay's ability as a presiding 
elder to secure them. In fact, Brother Gay 
is a man of fine executive ability, and no pre- 
siding elder could look more carefully after 
all the interests of his work than he. He 
is very unassuming, but strong and aggress- 
ive. Plans were carefully laid by the insti- 
tute and placed in the hands of the preachers 
and laymen for execution. If our plans are 
worked we shall be able to erase all the black 
from Brother Siler 's "calico rag" and instead 
place there white set with blue and red stars. 
We can and* we will if our people will come up 
to the help of the Lord and the preachers. 

The Forest City charge is progressing slowly 
but surely. Bad weather has militated greatly 



against church going. The good people have 
pounded us, and every time we go out and come 
in we bring more "pounds." It all works 
admirably and creates a feeling of good will 
between both the preacher and the people. It 
is blessed to give, but I find it blessed to re- 
ceive also. The "stringency" of the times 
wrought havoc with our finances last year, but 
we hope to redeem ourselves this. This is our 
aim, and to God we look for grace to help. 

Yours fraternally, J. A. Bowles. 



Sunday school, 
membership of 



county, representing a 
do hereby petition the 



Some Pertinent Questions 

Is your church Insured? Ask your stew- 
ards. Did you know that the Methodist 
church in North Carolina has been losing on 
an average for the past seventeen years $3,551 
from fires? Every once in a while a petition 
is handed around to raise money to help re- 
place a burned church or parsonage for an 
unfortunate congregation. Would you like 
to send out a petition to raise money to re- 
place your church building, or would you like 
to donate money yourself to rebuild? If you 
should have a fire, the chances are that you 
would pass around a petition and donate, too. 

This could be prevented if you would see 
that your church is insured. Ask your stew- 
ards if they have protected the church prop- 
erty intrusted to their care. The chances are 
that they have not, as there is only one-fourth 
of the church property in the State insured. 

Would you take stock in a corporation which 
carries no insurance? Stop and take stock of 
your church building and furnishings and see 
how much you have invested. It is the most 
profitable stock you have on the face of the 
earth, and yields you larger dividends; and, if 
it is not insured, it should be done at once. 
If it burns without insurance, you are not a 
good congregation. More business methods 
should be practiced in the administration of the 
affairs of our churches. 

As a steward or trustee, do you not think 
you are just as responsible morally for the 
church property placed in your hands to look 
after as the directors of a stock corporation are 
legally responsible for property placed in their 
hands to supervise ? It is impossible for you to 
prevent a fire, but you can prevent a loss by 
seeing that church property is insured. 

It is the purpose of the Methodist Mutual 
Fire Insurance Company to furnish to the 
Methodist Church in North Carolina protection 
against fire at the least possible cost. 

W. E. Webb, Sec. & Treas.. 
Methodist Mutual Fire Ins. Co. 

Statesville, N. C. 



To the Preachers and Sunday School Superin- 
tendents of North Carolina 

The Anti-Saloon League has just held a great 
convention and has declared for a law to pro- 
hibit the delivery of liquor for beverage pur- 
poses. It also passed a resolution asking the 
preachers and Sunday school superintendents 
to make Sunday, January 24th, temperance 
Sunday and either pass resolutions by the con- 
gregations, memorializing the General Assemb- 
ly for the above mentioned law, or give them 
opportunity to sign a petition that day for the 
same. Please do this and send the resolutions 
or petitions as soon as you can, certainly not 
later than the first of February, to the Anti- 
Saloon League, Raleigh, that we may make a 
record of the number of names, etc. On the day 
after petitions or resolutions are received here, 
the Anti-Saloon League will turn them over to 
your representatives and senators to be pre- 
sented to the General Assembly. We must be 
up and doing for the next twenty days to put 
this measure through. I give below a form of 
resolution and petition. R. L. Davis, Supt. 

N. C. Anti-Saloon League. 



Resolution 

Whereas, there is a great demand, throughout 
the state as well as this section, for the pass- 
age of a law to prohibit the delivery of liquor 
for beverage purposes in North Carolina, and 

Whereas, such a bill will be presented to 
the present session of the North Carolina Gen- 
eral Assembly; 

We, the congregation of church (or 



General Assembly for the passage of this act. 

Pastor or Chm., 

Secretary. 

Petition 

To the North Carolina Senate: 

Care of the Hon. (name of your senator) 
Raleigh, N. C. 

We, the undersigned citizens of Coun- 
ty, petition the General Assembly now in ses- 
sion to pass a law to prohibit the delivery of 
liquor for beverage purposes in North Carolina. 

(Arrange for men to sign in one column and 
women in the other.) 



Petition 

To the N. C. House of Representatives : 

Care of the Hon. (name of your representa- 
tive.) 

Raleigh, N. C. 

We, the undersigned citizens of ■ Coun- 
ty, petition the General Assembly now in ses- 
sion to pass a law to prohibit the delivery of 
liquor for beverage purposes in North Carolina. 

(Arrange for men to sign in one column and 
women in the other.) 



Trinity College Notes 



The leading article in the South Atlantic 
Quarterly for January, which has just been is- 
sued from the press,' deals with "North Caro- 
lina's Taxation Problem, " and is written by Dr. 
C. L. Raper, of the University of North Caro- 
lina. Dr. Raper has made a careful study of 
the possibilities of improvement in the taxa- 
tion system of the state under the present con- 
stitution. His study of the question ought to 
be of great value to members of the Legislature, 
who will soon be called upon to consider it. 

The second article, by Professor Harry E. 
Smith, of the University of Washington, deals 
with the matter of Federal Taxation, "The 
War Revenue Act of 1914." Dr. Smith re- 
lates the circumstances under which this emer- 
gency tax law passed the two houses of Con- 
gress and gives an interesting analyis of its 
contents. 

Dr. Philip Alexander Bruce, who has fre- 
quently contributed literary essays to the Quar- 
terly, now writes very entertainingly concern- 
ing his "Plantation Memories of the Civil 
War. ' ' He presents a vivid picture of the war 
as it appeared to a boy on a Virginia planta- 
tion. 

This issue of the Quarterly also contains 
three literary articles. Mr. Harry St. George 
Tucker, of the North Carolina A. & M. College, 
writes on "What is Wrong with American Lit- 
erature?" Mr. Hyder E. Rollins, of John Hop- 
kins University, contributes a study of "Wil- 
liam Cowper Brann. " Brann was years ago 
the editor of the "Iconoclast," a publication 
which at one time made a great sensation in 
Texas and in the country at large by its 
vitriolic attacks on men and institutions. A 
paper on "The New Feminism in Literature" 
is contributed by Mr. H. Houston Peckham, of 
Purdue University. Mr. Peckham shows how 
greatly the part of women in producing lit- 
erature has increased in recent years. 

This number also contains an article of in- 
terest to students of North Carolina History, 
by Mr. Alfred J. Morrison. His subject is 
"Lord Granville's Line." He gives an account 
of the proprietors of the Carolinas, and of 
some of the questions which arose out of their 
ownership of land in this state. 

Professor E. C. Brooks, of the department of 
education, addressed the teachers of Orange 
County at their regular monthly meeting in 
Hillsboro, last Saturday. 

President William P. Few has been absent 
from the college a few days attending a meet- 
ing in Nashville, Tenn., of a committee on text 
books and literature of the Sunday School 
Board of the Southern Methodist Church. 

At a meeting of the Science Club Monday 
evening. Prof. M. A. Smith, Jr., of the depart- 
ment of physics, gave a lecture on "Electrical 
Injuries and Resuscitation." 



Page Eight 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 21, 1915 



Department of Woman's Work 

Conducted by Mrs. TV. R. Harris, Asheville, N. 0. 



"THY KINGDOM COME" 

"Lord, when we pray 'thy kingdom 
come,' 

Then fold our hands without a care, 
For souls whom thou hast died to save, 
We do but mock thee with our prayer. 

Thou couldst have sent an angel band 
To call thine erring children home, 

And thus through heavenly ministries 
On earth thy kingdom might have 
come. 

But since to human hands like ours 
Thou hast committed work divine, 

Shall not our eager hearts make haste 
To join their feeble powers with 
thine? 

To word and work shall not our hands 
Obedient move, nor lips be dumb, 

Lest through our sinful love of ease 
Thy kingdom should delay to come?" 
— Woman's Missionary Advocate. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

It is again urged that the names of 
delegates to the Annual Meeting in 
Charlotte be sent promptly to Mrs. 
E. N. Clemence, 706 N. Church Street. 
Those who are entitled to go as dele- 
gates are the presidents and one elect- 
ed delegate from adult auxiliaries, and 
Young People's societies, and the lady 
managers, or superintendents of 
Junior Divisions. 

The Secretary of the Conference has 
secured reduced rates to the meeting 
on the certificate plan. Let every one 
who attends, in whatever capacity it 
may be, remember to ask for a cer- 
tificate when purchasing a ticket. 



THIRD ANNUAL MEETING W. M. S. 
W. N. C. CONFERENCE 

Tryon St. Church, Charlotte, N. C, 
January 29-February 3 

We are greatly disappcinted that we 
have not been able to get a copy of the 
program of the coming annual meeting, 
which we had hoped to have for this is- 
sue of the Advocate. For some reason 
it has not yet reached us, but we very 
much hope that the program committee 
will get it in our next issue, so that 
we may have a foretaste of the good 
things that we are expecting at this 
meeting. 

Only one week more until we are 
gathered in annual session. My dear 
sisters, are we ready for this important 
occasion? Have we daily carried this 
meeting to God in prayer and asked his 
blessings for us at that time? We feel 
sure that this is going to be one of the 
greatest meetings we have ever had. 
There are many things of importance 
to be brought up for discussion, sever- 
al returned missionaries will be there 
to inspire us with their presence and 
messages, the reports of the various 
Conference Officers, reviewing the past 
year's work and laying plans and giv- 
ing suggestions for the new year, will 
be both interesting and profitable. Will 
you be there to take a part and enjoy 
this occasion? The Entertainment 
Committee urges the auxiliaries to 
send in at once the names of the dele- 
gates who expect to be in attendance. 
This question of assigning homes to the 
delegates is not an easy one and we 
can greatly help the committee by send- 
ing in our names early. 

Look on page 18 of the Second Annu- 
al Report of our Conference and read 
again the following resolution adopted 
at Hendersonville: "Resolved, that 
hereafter delegates to the annual meet- 
ing be required to send the names to 
the chairman of the entertainment 
committee at least ten days before the 
first day of the meeting." 

Now, if the name of your delegate 
has not been sent, do not neglect to get 
It to Mrs. E. N. Clemence, North 
( H irch Street, Charlotte, N. C, at once. 



NOTICE TO DELEGATES TO ANNU- 
AL MEETING 

Mrs. T. F. Marr, our Conference Re- 
cording Secretary, has had a communi- 
cation from the railroad authorities, 
and if there are as many as 200 certif- 
icates presented at the annual meeting 
there will be a reduction given in the 
railroad fare to Charlotte on the occa- 
sion of the meeting, so each delegate is 
urged to be sure to procure a certificate 
when she purchases her ticket, as the 
Conference is very anxious to secure 
the reduction. Do not fail to attend to 
this, please. 



ATTENTION, DISTRICT SECRETA- 
RIES 

In compliance with Article 2 (a) in 
the Report of Committee on Extension 
of Work, adopted at Annual Meeting at 
Hendersonville in May, 1914, there will 
be a meeting of the District Secretaries 
held in Tryon Street Church, Charlotte, 
N. C, at 3:30 o'clock, on Friday af- 
ternoon, Jan. 29th, the opening day of 
the Conference. Every district secre- 
tary is urged to be present at this 
meeting as it is of the greatest import- 
ance. Mrs. V. L. Stone, Chairman. 



NEW ORGANIZATION 

From Brevard, Asheville District, 
there comes the cheering news of the 
organization of a Young People's Soci- 
ety. We will let the Corresponding 
Secretary speak for himself: 

"On January 4, 1915, the young peo- 
ple of the Methodist church of Brevard 
organized a society under the leader- 
ship of Mrs. A. M. Verdery. To the 
eighteen charter members there have 
been added seven and we now number 
twenty-five interested and enthusiastic 
members. To increase our member- 
ship still further, each member is ask- 
ed to enlist as many members from 
week to week as he or she is able. The 
object of our society is the betterment 
of the young life of the church and to 
aid and strengthen the Sunday school, 
and all persons between the ages of 
fourteen and twenty-five are eligible to 
membership. The regular meeting of 
the society is held each Monday night 
in the ladies' parlor of the church. 

Eugene Allison, Cor. Sec. 

The following are the officers of this 
live organization: President, Miss 
Agnes Kilpatrick; 1st vice-president, 
Miss Bertie Ballard; 2nd vice-presi- 
dent, Mrs. Paul Smathers; superin- 
tendent social service, Miss Annie Mae 
Robbins; recording secretary, Mr. Wal- 
ter Whitmire; corresponding secretary, 
Mr. Eugene Allison; treasurer, Miss 
Daisy Norton. No superintendent of 
mission study and publicity reported. 



NEW OFFICERS STATESVI LLE DIS- 
TRICT 

Taylorsville — Adult Society 

President, Mrs. Eugene Cross; 1st 
vice-president, not elected; 2nd vice- 
president, Miss Esther Bolick; superin- 
tendent of study and publicity, Mrs. 
DeWitt Henley; superintendent of so- 
cial service, Mrs. H. D. Lindsay; 
superintendent of supplies, Mrs. W. T. 
Royland; corresponding secretary, 
Miss Esther Bolick; recording secre- 
tary, Mrs. R. E. Hunt; treasurer, Mrs. 
J. Frank Clement. 

Juniors 

President, Miss Elizabeth Lindsay; 
1st vice-president, Miss Jennie Bur- 
gess; 2nd vice-president, Miss Lillie 
Burgess; superintendent of publicity, 
Miss Clara Henley, superintendent of 
social service, Miss Alice Cross; re- 
cording secretary, Miss Evelyn Hen- 
ley; corresponding secretary, Miss 
Esther Bolick; treasurer, Miss Win- 
nie Mae Rowland. 

Hickory 

President, Mrs. J. W. Shuford; 1st 
vice-president, Mrs. Lloyd Miller; 2nd 
vice-president, Mrs. D, F. Megsjck; 



treasurer, Mrs. G. F. Ivey; recording 
secretary, Mrs. J. F. Peterson; corre- 
sponding secretary, Mrs. T. P. Bonner; 
superintendent of social service, Mrs. 
J. D. Williams; superintendent of mis- 
sion study and publicity, none report- 
ed; superintendent of supplies, Mrs. 
Robert Foster; agent for Missionary 
Voice, Mrs. B. F. Seagle. 



PLEDGE MEETING AT REIDSVILLE 

We had recently a most interest- 
ing account of a "pledge meeting" 
held at Reidsville and we fully in- 
tended to give it in this issue for the 
benefit of our readers who have not 
yet held a similar meeting, but so 
carefully have we placed it away that 
we have failed to find it thus far. 
Suffice it to say that the auxiliary at 
Reidsville is starting the new year 
with the pledge money in sight and 
the work well planned. This occa- 
sion was one of the many pleasant 
and profitable occasions that this aux- 
iliary enjoys. The society is looking 
forward with great pleasure to the 
district meeting of the Greensboro dis- 
trict, which is scheduled to take place 
early in February, and are expecting to 
gain much inspiration and pleasure 
from the meeting. 



NORWOOD AUXILIARY 

A goodly number of the members 
of the Norwood auxiliary met at the 
home of Mrs. J. F. Shinn on January 
4th, for the first meeting of the new 
year. After the devotional exercises 
came a short and interesting pro- 
gram, a feature of which was the 
election of officers for 1915, result- 
ing as follows: President, Mrs. J. 
F. Shinn; 1st vice-president, Mrs. J. 
D. Rankin; 2nd vice-president, Mrs. 
W. C. Kendall; corresponding secre- 
tary, Mrs. M. E. Blalock; superinten- 
dent of mission study and publicity, 
Mrs. M. E. Blalock; superintendent 
of supplies, Mrs. R. M. Taylor. (No 
superintendent of social service, re- 
cording secretary or treasurer report- 
ed.— Ed.) 

The society holds the meetings in 
the winter at the homes of the mem- 
bers and they prove delightful social 
occasions as well as occasions of prof- 
it and interest. 

The past year has been a very suc- 
cessful one with our auxiliary and 
while many of us have had very great 
sorrow we are grateful that God has 
spared us to work for Him another 
year and may He find us diligent 
about His business. 

Mrs. M. E, Blalock, 
Supt. of Publicity. 



We sympathize very deeply with 
Mrs. F. B. McKinne, corresponding 
secretary of the foreign department of 
the North Carolina Conference, in the 
death of her only son, David, a bright, 
promising lad of sixteen years, who 
was accidentally killed while hunting 
a few days ago with a companion near 
his home at Louisburg. Mr. and Mrs. 
McKinne are prominent in the church 
work at their home and the sympathy 
of hosts of friends are with them in 
their great bereavement. We knew 
David as one of the Light Bearers of 
Central church, Concord, several years 
ago, and though one of the younger 
members of the society, he was one of 
the most faithful of that loyal band 
of workers. May God give them His 
all-sustaining grace and comfort their 
hearts! 



HOW CAN WE DO IT? 

This is the question that is being 
asked by the loyal-hearted members 
of the Woman's Missionary Society 
as we begin the work of the new year. 
How shall we lay wisely the financial 
plans for the conduct of the work 
which, in one form or another, has 
been our privilege and blessing for 
thirty-six years, and which, newly or- 
ganized, we undertake as a labor of 
love for our Lord? 

Its schools and institutions for In- 
dividual and community uplift, Its 
workers. Jn our own land and In the 



Orient and Latin America, are ours 
to support by our gifts and prayers. 
And because this is our one avenue 
of approach and source of relief for 
the world's needs of today, our one 
opportunity of ministry to the great 
host of His helpless little ones, and 
as such is our opportunity of minis- 
try to Him, every woman of us who 
loves God, who has faith in the tri- 
umph of His gospel, and who desires 
to have a part in saving His lost and 
helping His needy ones, is earnestly 
seeking an answer to the question. 

There can be no dissenting voice 
among us in regard to the necessity of 
provision, for the "full and regular pay- 
ment of the small sum for dues, re- 
tirement and relief, and Conference 
expense funds which constitute our 
membership obligation. This is the 
foundation of the support of our work. 

But this child of our love has long 
since outgrown its swaddling clothes 
of membership funds, and it is our 
privilege to provide for the larger de- 
mands of its maturity. We do this 
only by making voluntary offerings 
for the work. These voluntary offer- 
ings constitute our pledge fund, and 
upon the liberality of these depend 
much of the support and all of the 
enlargement of the work. If we would 
plan for growth we must be sure that 
our pledges exceed those of last year. 
As we count over "what we gave, and 
in many instances, remember what a 
hard time we had paying it, we may 
well feel very hesitant about increas- 
ing it. But we must not refuse to 
do so until we have weighed care- 
fully our personal or auxiliary plans 
of last year. Did we begin at the 
very beginning of the year to pay 
what we pledged? Did we give God 
throughout the year His part of all the 
money we handled? And did we con- 
tinually pray to be shown how we 
might be able to give more? Be sure 
that such a plan of giving adopted 
so now, and test its satisfying experi- 
make us safe in promising a far larg- 
er amount than we have ever given be- 
fore. 

An Early Beginning 

We must begin early in the year if 
we would make our offerings worthy 
ones. At the end of the year we will 
give only the small sum we have left 
from everything else, whereas this 
early beginning will make possible a 
gift many times as large. And not 
only would a larger sum be the re- 
sult of early giving, but the large 
amount paid annually in interest by 
the Council on borrowed money, would 
be saved to our Council treasury. In 
one year this is enough to support 
seven missionaries on the foreign 
field. Were there no other argument 
in favor of this plan, this one ought 
to make us realize how necessary it 
is that we begin early to pay our 
pledge. 

God's Part 

We must give God his part of all 
the money we handle through the year 
just as it comes to us. Many have al- 
ready learned the value of this way, 
and they are unanimous in testifying 
that it is a blessed way. If any of 
us have not entered into this blessed 
relationship with our Lord in the 
handling of His money, shall we not do 
now, and test its satisfying experi- 
ences for ourselves? 

There is a large class of women be- 
longing to the Woman's Missionary So- 
ciety who have no regular income, and 
must, therefore, depend on husband or 
some one else for money for personal 
use and to give. It is possible in 
most of these cases to tithe this al- 
lowance without detriment to the fam- 
ily comfort. Those who have under- 
taken this have found that the house- 
hold is not defrauded by such giving. 
The careful management of the re- 
maining nine-tenths yields just as sat- 
isfactory results as the entire allow- 
ance would yield under other use. It 
is most likely that the zealous spirit 
will prove contageous in " the house- 
more," she said and went her way. A 

(Continued on page 9) 



January 21, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Nine 



1 Epworth League Department 

$ Conducted oy Mist A. Stanly Hall, Hickory, 27. O. 

? 



THE DEVOTIONAL TOPIC AND THE 
ERA 

A correspondent writes suggesting 
that a weekly leaflet giving the Ep- 
worth League devotional "lesson" be 
published for use of the Leaguers, 
many of whom do not take the Era. 
The devotional topic is to be regarded 
not as a "lesson" but as a theme for 
meditation and testimony upon the 
basis of which each member may give 
his word of experience or exhorta- 
tion; hence the use of a leflet in the 
meeting is to be discouraged. It would 
not be possible for us to issue both 
the leaflet and the Era; and as the 
Era is essential to League work in 
many other respects than as an aid 
in preparing for the devotional meet- 
ing, we must have the Era. Our Ep- 
worth League work would be impos- 
sible without the Era. At the club 
rate of 50 cents a' year the Era can 
easily be put into each family con- 
nected with the League. This ideal— 
the Era in every League home— 
would mean >a tremendous impetus in 
all departments of League work. 

We copy this from the Era, and add 
that the League Page in the Advocate 
is for the exchanging of ideas on 
League work that will tend to strength- 
en and better individual chapters, 
and not for the printed lesson. If 
you have different ideas, let us hear 
from you. 



TEN 1 WILLS FOR THE COMING 
YEAR 

By James Mudge 

1. I will think pleasantly of every- 
body, so far as possible, and send out 
my love widely over the earth. On 
the streets, in the oars, everywhere, 1 
can practice loving people. 

2. I will make my goodness agree- 
able. It is high treason against the 
majesty of virtue to be good yet dis- 
agreeable, for it creates a prejudice 
hard to be overcome, and puts a prem 
ium on plausible, smiling iniquity. 

3. I will be servant of all, but ser- 
vile to none. It is wholly right that 
we maintain a proper self-respect, a 
wholesome independence; a pretty 
backbone is no help to friendship 
either with God or man. 

4. I will be content with what 1 
have, but not with what I am. Ambi- 
tion is all right, but with most people 
it takes the wrong direction and ex- 
pends itself foolishly on material 
things. 

5. I will say, "God forbid," when a 
misfortune seems to be impending; 
for we are told to pray, "Lead us not 
into temptation." But when it has 
fallen upon me I will promptly say, 
"God be praised;" for the Father nev- 
er takes anything from us but to give 
us something better in its place, nor 
does he permit any real evil to befall 
his children. 

6. I will pray more. No amount of 
outward bustle, of ecclesiastical or 
benevolent activities, can take the 
place of inward devotion, of that com- 
munion with God which is the truest 
source of highest, most enduring use- 
fulness. 

7. I will be a morning breeze, mak- 
ing it easier for others to breathe, so 
that it may be said of me as it was 
of one' in ancient times, "Onesipherus 
oft refreshed me." 

8. I will take things more easily, 
that is, in temporal matters, ceasing 
from the fret and the fears, the hurry 
and the worry, that I may have leis- 
ure to invite my soul as well as prop 
erly care for my body. I will take 
time to be holy and to be well. 

9. I will expect more of myself, and 
less of other peo,ple. It is a great 
thing to walk with a large heart in 
a narrow path, cultivating breadth of 
sympathy and seeing the good ip oth 



ers as well as recognizing the limita- j 
tions of their opportunities, while at 
the same time holding one's self up to 
a high standard and being chary of ex- 
cusing one's own defects. 

10. I will be absolutely loyal to 
Christ. Surely, this is within our 
power, however far we may feel in- 
capable of walking perfectly before 
the eyes of men. Christ makes no un- 
reasonable demands, lays no heavy 
burdens, bids us do only what is for 
our own best interests, and if we love 
him anywhere nearly as he deserves to 
be loved we shall delight to please him 
in all things, shall be ashamed to 
prove untrue at any point. 



WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT 

(Continued from Page 8) 



hold and that the husband and chil- 
dren will enter into the scheme and 
gladly cut out the extravagant expen- 
ditures in order to have more to give. 
In one of our Conferences the third 
vice-president was so earnest in tith- 
ing that part of the family income 
which passed through her hands that 
her husband was deeply impressed 
and at the beginning of the year an- 
nounced his intention of becoming a 
tither. God will use our unselfish ef- 
forts in behalf of his cause. 

There may be some cases in which 
this plan does not seem possible, and 
love must be even more keen to find 
the small sums along through the 
year which can be put into the mis- 
sionary treasury. God's word to Mo- 
ses may be his word for us: "What 
is in thine hand?" It may surprise 
us to find how often there is some- 
thing at hand which can be turned 
into money for him. This may be 
the Sunday eggs, an extra pound of 
butter, a sale of a cast off garment, a 
bit of sewing or embroidery for a 
neighbor. You loving ones who have 
so often found it for him can testify 
to the blessed results of this faithful 
use of the commonplace thing. A wo- 
man in Florida gleefully pointed out 
to the writer an orange tree which, 
some years ago she had persuaded her 
husband to bud for her. The income 
from the tree has increased from two 
to twenty-five dollars, and her hus- 
band laughingly declared that he had 
been almost afraid sometimes that its 
large yield would tempt him not to 
give it all. 

Prayer for Money to Give to God 

Underlying the successful working 
of these plans there must constantly 
be a current of earnest prayer that 
God will show us how we may in- 
crease our gifts. The poorest of us 
have some ways to give to Him if our 
eyes were only opened to see. The 
following homely story will illustrate 
the truth of this: 

A devout old washerwoman who con- 
stantly surprised her friends by her 
liberal giving appeared one morning 
before her "white missus" and said: 
"I want you to pray God to show me 
how I can have more to give." "O, 
Zanie, you give more than your share 
now!" the lady replied, thinking to 
comfort and satisfy Zanie. "I ain't 
tole you to tell me that. I axed you 
to pray God to sho me how to give 
few days later she appeared with a 
beaming face and told her white friend, 
that as she prayed God said: "Zanie, 
there's your pipe." There was no use 
to pray longer. Goer had showed her 
the way and she joyfully exhibited 
the twenty-five cents she had saved for 
Him, the giving of which had re- 
quired that she renounce her only 
luxury. Who of us will be so honest 
with Him? We may be sure that if 
we so truly desire to do for Him He 
will show us the way and that His 
way will bring greater joy than any 
earthly possession or condition can 
%\ye. — Leaflet for January, 1915, 



Standard Form 
Collection Envelopes 



Western North Carolina Conference 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South 

HOLT'S CHAPEL 



FOR PASTOR'S SALARY 



AMOUNT 



tNjame 



Date. 



.191.. 



Dollars 



Cents 



MISSUS AND CONFERENCE GOLLECTIONS 

Western North Carolina Conference 

Methodist Episcopal Church, South 
MOUNT ZION CHURCH 



Name. 
Date .. 



Dollar 



Cents 



$1.90 for lOOO, delivered 

$1.40 for additional 1000, delivered 
FOR EITHER FORM 



This price is based on using the above forms, changing name of church 
only. The large envelope is manila, and of the quality regularly used for 
Pastor's Salary collections. The small envelope can be furnished in white, 
green or cherry. Its difference in color and size from the Pastor's Salary 
form makes it ideal for Missions and Conference Collections. 

If special form is desired the price will average $2.40 for the first 1000, 
and $1 40 for additional 1000's, delivered. 

Special rates on large quantities. 

The Advocate Press, Greensboro, N. C. 



Carolina & Northwestern Rwy* Co, 

Schedule Effective October 18th, 1914 



Northbound 


NO. 10 
Passenger 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 8 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 6 
Passenger 
Sun. Only 


NO. 50 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 52 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


Chester Lv. 


7 50 a m 

8 36 

9 21! 
9 30 

10 28 

11 05 

12 05 p m 
1 08 

a OOx 
4 09 
4 35 








4 16 pm 

6 38 
8 20 


Yorkville " 








Gastonla " 








Gastonia ' ' 


4 30 p m 
6 40 
6 44 
. 7 80 
8 50 






Newton " 








Hickory ' • 


12 05 p m 
1 08 


6 45 a m 
8 07 




Lenoir " 




Lenoir " 




Mortimer ' ' 










Edgemont Ar. 










Southbound 


NO. 9 
Passenger 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 7 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 5 
Passenger 
Sun. Only 


NO. 51 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 53 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


Edgemont Lv". 


9 00 a m 
9 10 
11 20! 

1 35 p m 

2 35 

3 05 
8 43 

4 30 

5 05x 

5 54 

6 40 










Mortimer ' ' 










Lenoir ." 










Lenoir " 


7 00 a m 

8 15 

9 00 
9 51 

11 23 


8 15 a m 

9 12 


1 10 p m 
3 20 




Hickory ' ' 




Newton " 




Lincolnton " 








Gastonia ' ' 








Gastonia ' ' 






11 50 a m 
1 24 

3 10 p m 


Yorkville " 








Chester Ar. 












1 



x Leave 



CONNECTIONS 



Arrive 



CHESTER— Southern Railway, S. A. L. and L. & C. 
YORKVILLE— Sou hern Railwav LI NCOLNTON— S. A. L. 

GASTONIA— Southern Railway. Piedmont & Northern Railway 
NEWTON and HICKORY— Southern Railway 



E. F. REID. G. P. Agt. 



CHESTER, S. C. 



Page Ten 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 21, 191 



MISSIONARY NOTES 

FROM FIELD SECRETARY 



January 12-17 — District Missionary 
Institutes. 

January 12-13 — Waynesville District 
at Clyde; L. T. Cordell, P. E.; A. C. 
Reynolds, District Lay Leader. Prof. 
Reyonlds was not present. The meet- 
ing, though called for Haywood coun- 
ty, had representatives from as far 
west as Bryson City. Brother Cordell 
moves busily on in his fourth year. 
The features of his meeting were a 
blizzard, emphasis on revivals, on Dr. 
McLarty's address on evangelism, ex- 
perience meeting with preachers led 
hy presiding elder, round table con- 
ference on the church conference, 
church leader, committees and the 
every-member canvass, forming of 
reading circle among preachers. 

Brother Cordell calls his preaches to 
an educational campaign in every 
church. The District last year, it is 
said, for the first time paid more for 
missions than it received. 

* * * * 

January 13 — Asheville District, for 
Asheville and vicinity, at Central, 
Asheville; C. A. Wood, P. E.; L. B. 
Rogers, District Lay Leader. Both 
present. All the pastors of Asheville 
and vicinity, with many laymen, heard 
Dr. McLarty's appeai for the evangel- 
istic pitch in all church work with the 
great objective of soul saving, at 3 p. 
m. At night Brother Wood led the 
service in joint meeting of all the 
Asheville Methodist Churches. He will 
during the year conduct an institute 
in each county of his district. 

* * * * 

January 13-14 — Morganton District at 
Forest City; J. E. Gay, P. E.; F. B. 
Chapman, District Lay Leader. Both 
present, with a large attendance of 
preachers, Sunday school superintend- 
ents, charge and church leaders of 
district. Rev. J. L. Smith, of Old Fort 
Circuit, had five laymen present. The 
Forest City community turned out in 
mass. The beautiful new church with 
comfortable pews, carpets, furnace 
heat and electric lights made a most 
comfortable meeting place. 

Dr. McLarty was at his best. Albert 
Sherrill at close of address called for 
an altar service. The Holy Ghost 
came down and preachers and laymen 
were lifted into the heavenlies for 
the revival campaign. I heard glow- 
ing reports of discussions the day pre- 
vious on matters vital to the church in 
the bounds of the district. 

* « * * 

January 14-15 — Statesville District at 
Statesville; L. T. Mann, P. E.; R. L. 
Snow, District Lay Leader. Both pres- 
ent. Most of the preachers and a 
goodly representation of the laymen — 
the best yet seen — taking the district 
as a whole, present. 

Dr. T. J. Ogburn's address on full 
collections was extraordinary. It will, 
by request, appear in Advocate. He is 
pastor at Mt. Zion station. His rebuke 
of the too common sin of covetousness 
was most timely and with convincing 
eloquence. 

Miss Lelia Tuttle from McTyerie's 
School in China, who had thrilled a 
great audience the night before Mc- 
Larty and I reached Statesville, gave 
an interesting exhibit of garments 
worn by the upper classes in China. 
Her brief, pertinent references to the 
social and religious customs ,prevalent 
there were helpful. She returns to 
China from her furlough in July. She 
will visit the Charlotte, Greensboro 
and Winston Institutes; also the State 
Normal at Greensboro and the Greens- 
boro College for Women, where she 
will deliver addresses. 

Miss Gertrude Allen, at the sugges- 
tion of Dr. Mann, was presented to the 
Institute by Rev. W. V. Honeycutt, as 
the youngest Sunday school superint- 
endent in Southern Methodism. She 
is fourteen years of age and has been 




FOR CHILDREN 

PICTORIAL BIBLES WITH HELPS 



The text is self -pronouncing, by 
the aid of which children can learn 
to pronounce the difficult Scripture 
proper names. 



Specimen of Type, 
"^TTHOSOEVEK belled 
T T eth that Je'sus is tha 
Christ Is born ol God : and 
every one that loveth hlnx 



™ With beautiful photo views of 
Size 5% x 3% scenes in Bible lands distributed 
inches. t hroughout the text. Also maps of 

Bible lands in colors. Also new 
Practical Helps to Bible Study, especially designed for 
instructing children in scriptural information. 
No. 91. Trench Seal Leather, overlapping 
covers, round corners, gold edges, 
gold titles. * f nn 

Publishers Price $1.30 Our Price-Post Paid, $ • »«U 
COLORED PICTURE EDITION 

Portraying in natural colors, scenes and places taken 

from nature and life in the Holy Band, 
No. 92. Same as No. 91. butwith Beautifully 

Colored Pictures tyr\ 
Publishers' Price $1.60 Our Price-Post Paid,* • 



FOR ADULTS, TEACHERS AND PREACHERS 

and all who would study the Word 
of God intelligently this edition is 
unsurpassed. The typeis large.clear 
Bourgeois, Self- Pronouncing, with 
liberal space between the words artd 
lines, which makes it easy to read. 

Size 8 x SVs inches. 



Specimen of 'Type. 



IT m From that time Je'§ua 
to preach, and to say, n Eepe 
the kingdom of heaven is 



Containing New Copyrighted 
Helps by Rev. P. N. PELOUBET, 
D. D. a Treasury of Biblical Infor- 
mation, practical comparative con- 
cordance, Oriental Light on theBible, 
Four Thousand Questions and 
Answers, New Colored Maps. 
No. 47, Divinity Circuit Teach- 
ers' Bible, French Seal Leather, 
red under gold edges. Silk Head 
bands and Silk Marker, 
Publishers' Price $2,70 * 4 Ac 
Our Price-Post Paid.Ipt.it D 
No. 81 . RL. Red Letter Teachers'Bible. The 
Words of Christ in the New Testament.Old Testament 
Passages Alluded to by Christ. Various Prophecies 
Relating to Christ in the Old Testament, etc., all 
PRINTED IN RED. Binding same as described 
above and same large Self -Pronouncing type.&n m 
Publishers' Price $3.20 Our Price-Post Paid,<P£- ' U 
No. 73X. Holman India Paper, Genuine 
Morocco, Leather Lined, Silk Sewed. Divinity 
Circuit, round corners, carmine under gold edges, silk 
head bands and silk marker, same type and Helps as 

PubTfshers' Price $7.76 Our Prlce-.Post Pald,$5.00 



FOR INTERMEDIATE S. S. SCHOLARS 

Large Clear Black Type, 
Self-Pronottncing.containinz 
Helps to Bible Study, 4000 
Questions and Answers, 
Maps in Colors, and Pre- 
sentation Page. A Beautiful 
Gift Bible. 




Specimen, of Type, 

~VSt And the prophet 
Is'ra-el, and said unto 
thyself, and mark, and 
Xor at the return of t 



Size 7x5 inches. ' 

No. 21. Divinity Circuit Style, Bound in 
French Seal Leather, round corners, red under gold 
edges, with silk head bands and purple silk marker, 
gold titles, etc. a « n c 

Publishers'Price$1.G0 Our Price-Post Paid, 5>l.oO 

No. 22. RL. Red Letter Scholars' Bible, same 
Bible as No. 215. with all the Sayings of Christ 
printed in Red, and with Red and gold INLAID 
PANEL SIDE TITLES, also Beautifully Colored 
Pictures, & 1 *7 c 

Publishers' Price $2.10 Our Price-Post Paid, * I . / O 



FOR OLD FOLKS and THE HOME 




Flexible Striding ' 



Printed from large Clear Pica Type, with Marginal 
References, Family Record and Maps. This HOME 
BIBLE is new and very desirable for every day use, 
containing all the advantages of a Family Bible in a 
conpact size that can be easily handled, with Record 
for Births, Marriages and Deaths. The best Bible 
obtainable for old folks who need extra large clear 
print and a light-weight book. 

No. 2014. Durably Bound in French Seal 
Leather, full flexible covers, round corners, red 
under gold edges, silk bead bands and silk marker.gold 
titles. 

Publishers' Price $3.00 Our Price-Post Paid, *t.OO 



SEND ALL ORDERS TO v U £ - Yl 

CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, Greensboro, N. C. 



for more than a year the duly elected 
superintendet of the Sunday school at 
Carson's Chapel on the Alexander Cir- 
cuit. She will most probably at an 
early date enter Davenport College 
for equipment for life as a Christian 
worker. 

Dr. McLarty's address melted all 
hearts and the altar service at the 
close will bear fruit in the harvest of 
souls .all over the district. 

Here, as elsewhere, abundant oppor- 
tunity was given me for the work with 
which I am specially charged. A most 
searching study of the charges on the 
black list as displayed from the Con- 
ference exhibit which hung on the 
walls was conducted by the presiding 
elder under the head of "Deficits — their 
cause and their remedy." Convincing 
proofs came out of the truth of the 
Japanese proverb that "the darkest 
place is at the base of the lighthouse" 
and that the question of revivals and 
full collections is mainly the old one of 
men — preachers and laymen. 

Dr. Mann and Brother Fink both paid 
a high tribute to the owners and mana- 
gers of the mills at Rhodhiss, who, 
though not of our faith, contribute lib- 
erally to the support of our pastor 
there and to the benevolences. 

Dr. Byrd was present to give valu- 
able suggestions in forming the read- 
ing circle with R. E. Hunt manager, 
and to speak at night. He regretted 
an emergency engagement that pre- 
vented his fulfilling of a promise to 
speak at Forest City. He is doing ex- 



tra work for Dr. Weaver on the Greens- 
boro District during the latter's en- 
forced absence for a little rest and re- 
pairs which his many friends earnestly 
hope will be but temporary. The book 
circle was formed at the morganton 
District meeting also. 

* * * * 
January 15-17 — Shelby District at 
Lincolnton; J. R. Scroggs, P. E.; C. W. 
Hoyle, District Lay Leader. Brother 
Hoyle was not present. The main 
meetings were held Saturday and Sun- 
day. Dr. McLarty spoke twice Satur- 
day. At this meeting and at some of 
the other Institutes individual sub- 
scriptions were taken to cover the Dis- 
trict pledges made at Conference to 
Paine College. Everywhere I have call- 
ed attention to Advocate Day, January 
17th. 

Lincolnton Station is highly pleased 
with Brother Paris. The Sunday 
school and church will support a native 
preacher in the foreign field at $250.00. 



own glory and the good of souls. Le 

us have a prayer after each sermon 
Greensboro, N. C. 



THE SANITARY' 



Individual flllRC 
Communion UUlfe 



List of thousands of churches using 
our cups and FREE CATALOG with 
quotations sent upon request. 
Sanitary Communion Outfit Co. . 71st St.. Rochester, H. 1 



*§oo 

Delivered , 



PRAYER AFTER SERMON 

A. D. Betts 

Our Discipline says we shall have 
a prayer after morning sermon. When 
one in the right spirit begins to preacn 
a sermon he feels the need of divine 
help. He wants the people to pray 
for him while he preaches. When his 
sermon is finished he feels his litttle- 
ness as no man except a preacher ever 
feels it. He wants the people to pray 
that God may use his effort for His 



This is one time where | 
the cheapest 13 positively 
the best. You could pay 
ag'reatdeal more, butt 
you could not get a mora [ 
durable, a more service- 
able, a more humane, • I 
more practical collar for your horae or mule j 
than, 

THE JLAMKFORB 
Humane Horse Collar 
Delivered anywhere for $1.00 

I It's cheap because it's made of cotton and 
I manufactured in the South. It'B durable , 
I because of the extra heavy duck covering 
I and leather trimmings. It's humane, be- . 
I cause it is soft and pliable, the medicated \ 
I cotton fibre conforming to any neck and 
I curing galls and soro Bhoulders while the 
it animal works. 

I If vour dealer can't Bupply you write to ui 
I direct. Booklet and full information on re- 
I quest. ^Orders filled same day received. 

COUCH BROS. MFG. CO., 
I Box 974 I T Atlanta, Ga. 
1 Box 19 Memphis. Tenia. 



\ 



January 31, 1915 



NOKTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Eleven 



Our Dead 

HARTSELL— Carrie Elizabeth Hart- 
sell was born March 16th, 1873; died 
December 3rd, 1914. At the age of 
twelve she was converted and joined 
the Methodist Church, South, at Beth- 
el. Hers was such a consistent life 
that all who knew her respected her 
church loyalty. The last fifteen years 
of her life were filled with bodily suf- 
fering; yet through it all she never 
murmured or complained. Her atti- 
tude toward God and all things was 
a beautiful example of perfect conse 
cration. No wonder she was ready for 
the summons, and that those who knew 
her and heard such strong testimonies 
of abiding faith from her own lips 
weep not as those who have no hope. 

What a happy assurance her friends 
and loved ones have of seeing her 
where "there is no death?" She loved 
the "Advocate," therefore it is our 
pleasure to pen these words to its 
columns in honor of her life. 

May God in His mercy bring us all 
to be reunited with her and all the 
good, when life is over here! 

Her Pastor. 



BREEDLOVE— Nora Kate Breedlove, 
the little daughter of Eph and Sallie 
Breedlove, was born February 4th, 
1910, and died December 17, 1914; aged 
four years, ten months and 13 days. 
She was bright, beautiful and attrac- 
tive to all who knew her. While her 
years were but few she lived long 
enough to gain the affections of her 
parents and loved ones. 

Kate was stout and healthy until a 
few days before her death. She was 
stricken with a severe case of pneu- 
monia. All that the tender hands of 
parents, friends and a skilled physician 
could do was done, but to no avail. 
For God in his infinite wisdom saw 
best to take her to himself. This act 
of providence was a sore affliction to 
the entire family. But these afflic- 
tions if borne patiently "worketh for 
us a far more exceeding and eternal 
weight of glory." "For we know that 
the sufferings of their present time are 
not worthy to be compared with the 
glory which shall be revealed in us." 

On Friday, December 18, the funeral 
services were conducted by the writer 
at the home of her parents at Almond, 
N. C, after which her little body was 
borne to the cemetery and laid away to 
await the resurrection morn. Our 
hearts go out in sympathy for the 
grief-stricken parents and friends. 

Carl A. Johnson, P. C. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas, Our Heavenly Father in 
His infinite wisdom has seen fit to take 
from our midst our friend and co- 
worker, Mrs. Eula Grimsley Taylor, 
be it therefore resolved: 

First, That we the members of the 
Missionary Society of Wadesboro Meth- 
odist Church bow in humble submis- 
sion to the will of Him who doeth all 
things well. 

Second, That in her death the Mis- 
sionary Society has lost one of the best 
and most faithful members and we feel 
that we have sustained an irreparable 
loss. 

Third, To those who with us mourn 
her loss we offer our tenderest and 
deepest sympathy. We are glad she 
has lived among us and grieve that she 
has been called away from us. In this 
our heartfelt sorrow we commend our- 
selves and others who loved her to 
Him who has given and taken away. 
Blessed be the name of the Lord. 

Fourth, That a cppy of these resolu- 
tions be sent the bereaved family, to 
the local papers, and to the Christian 
Advocate for publication. 

Mrs. George M. Stanback, 
Mrs. Clarence M. Burns, 
Mrs. Isaac H. Horton, 
Mrs. W. B. Blalock. 



JOYCE — Mrs. D. R. Joyce died Jan- 
uary 1, 1915, aged 68 years. Her first 
marriage was to Rev. T. G. Hoyle, of 
our Conference, who died many years 
ago. She was the wife of an itinerant 
about nine years. 

She was a bright Christian woman 
and has gone to her reward. She was 
laid to rest in the Madison cemetery. 
She leaves a husband, Brother D. R. 
Joyce, one of the stewards of the 
church; two sisters and three brothers 
to mourn her loss. One of the broth- 
ers is our charge lay leader, Brother 
George W. Martin, who was very much 
devoted to his sister. 

Brother Sprinkle, our new presiding 
elder, went with the pastor to see her 
and prayed a fervent prayer for her 
a few days before she died. She so 
heartily approved his prayer with much 
fervor though weak and frail as she 
was. She loved her church and her 
Lord. Her pastor visited her many 
times and saw her as she bore her 
illness with patience and resignation. 

"Well done, thou good and faithful 
servant, enter into the joy of thy 
Lord." "I heard a voice from heaven 
saying unto me, Write, Blessed are 
the dead which die in the Lord from 
henceforth: Yea, saith the Spirit, that 
they may rest from their labors." 

A. R. Surratt, Pastor. 



GORDON — Mrs. Lamyra Gordon was 
born in Wilkes County, N. C, A. D. 
1826; and her gentle spirit quietly 
passed into eternity with the closing 
of the year 1914; she having lived 88 
years, eight months and three days. 
Hers was a beautiful and well-spent 
life. She was converted and joined 
the Methodist Church at the age of 
fifteen, and for 73 years was a faithful 
servant of her Lord. 

On New Year's Day her funeral was 
conducted by Rev. R. G. Tuttle, a form- 
er pastor, assisted by the writer; and 
her body was laid to rest in the tomb 
to await the resurrection of the Just. 

She is survived by one son, Frank 
Gordon, of Tennessee, and one daugh 
ter, Mrs. J. S. Bell, of Elkin, N. C, and 
a number of grand children and great 
grand children, with a host of friends 
v, ho mourn her departure. 

Servant of God, well done! 

J. P. Hipps. 



BUICE— On December 23, 1914, God 
in his infinite wisdom and goodness 
saw fit to send the dread mes- 
senger of death into the home of Mr. 
J. D. Buice and claimed as his own, 
his mother, Mrs. Cealah Jane Buice, 
who had reached the ripe age of sev- 
enty-two. Her maiden name was Han- 
kins. She was married to Mr. William 
Asbury Buice in 1864. To this union 
three sons were born, Messrs W. P., 
J. D. and J. H. Buice. Of these only 
Mr. J. D. Buice survives. With him 
his father and mother had made their 
home for the past year. He add- 
ed every comfort to them that a de- 
voted son could. Their lives were 
bright and happy, even in old age. 
Mr. W. A. Buice preceded his wife only 
a few month, his death occuring April 
12, 1914. He .peacefully passed into 
the great beyond with sweet hope in 
Jesus. Since that time Mrs. Buice has 
been in declining health, but not con- 
fined to her bed but a few days. Dur- 
ing her brief illness, though racked 
with pain, she would console her lov- 
ed ones with these words: "I know 
my time is drawing near. I am ready 
to go." To almost every one that 
spoke to her the answer would be, 
"God bless you, meet me in heaven." 
She was a member of the Methodist 
Church, having joined when quite 
young. At the time of her death she 
was a member of the Chadwick M. E. 
Church. It is so often the case with 
the old folks not to attend Sunday 
school, but it was not so with her. 
She was in the Bible Class, and always 
in her seat if not providentially hin- 
dered, and was an inspiration to the 
class. It was there we learned to 
know her. She was a devoted Chris- 



tian and always had an encouraging 
word for every one. There is a va- 
cancy in the home, in the church and 
in the community in which she lived 
that never can be filled, but her influ- 
ence still lives. 

While our hearts bleed with sorrow 
we rejoice in the ho.pe that her part- 
ing from this life means a birth into 
life eternal where nothing shall mar 
its beauty but where happiness shall 
reign supreme. 

"Servant of God, well done, 
Rest from thy loved employ; 
The battle fought, the victory won, 
Enter the Master's joy." 

Mrs. W. S. Biggers, 
Mrs. A. V. Bradley, 
Mrs. J. E. Winchester, 
Committee from S. S. 



MRS. MARY ELIZABETH EARP 

The deceased before marriage was 
Mary Elizabeth Boswell, daughter ol 
Geo. W. and Lucinday Boswell, of 
Baltimore county, Md. She was mar- 
ried to Joseph W. Earp, (now of Cen- 
tral's board of stewards), in 1873, to 
which union were born four children. 
One of these, Mrs. Clara Estelle Leon- 
ard, died in 1895. Those living are 
Mrs. S. A. Wanless, of Oklahoma, J. 
E. and Cora L. Earp, of Mt. Airy, (the 
latter an officer of the Conference 
Woman's Missionary Society). 

Mrs. Earp has been a member of 
the Methodist Church since young 
womanhood. She was a good woman, 
attentive to the church and prayer- 
meeting, and died enjoying the love 
and confidence of a large circle of 
friends. She suffered for many weeks, 
the best medical aid failing to check 
the progress of her disease, and died 
in peace on December 27th, in the 61st 
year of her age. Her pastor, assisted 
by D. Vance Price, conducted the fu- 
neral. Her body sleeps in the city 
cemetery. W. H. Willis. 



ANDERSON — Mrs. Martha Fontaine 
Anderson, widow of the late Major 
Leonard W. Anderson, was born in 
Henry County, Virginia, December 25, 
1822; and died at the old home, near 
Pine Hall, N. C, January 9th, 1915; 
being, since the recent Christmas day, 
in the 93rd year of her age. A Mother 
in Israel and one who was truly great 
has fallen! She was the great grand 
daughter of Patrick Henry, and the 
blood of the best families of Virginia 
for many generations coursed through 
her veins. But she set far greater 
store by the fact that in her thirteenth 
year, at a Methodist camp-meeting, 
she gave her heart to Christ, and be- 
came a child of the King Eternal, and 
joined the Methodist Church. 

During the recent holidays, she re- 
ceived many presents from friends, 
far and near. She exclaimed: "To 
think that I should be so honored just 
as I am about to pass out of life." On 



Thursday before she died on Friday 
night, she sang the old hymn: "Chil- 
dren of the Heavenly King," and be- 
came especially affected with emotion 
as she sang the last stanza: "Lord, 
obediently we'll go, gladly leaving all 
below, etc" It had been her custom 
for long years, to conduct worship in 
her room, hefore retiring at night. 
Next to the last night before she de- 
parted, she called the little children 
of Dr. J. L. Hanes around her bed, and 
repeated the 125th Psalm from mem- 
ory, and then prayed a most earnest 
prayer. After the prayer, she begged 
the young children that they would 
never forget that she had prayed for 
them before she left them. Just a 
short while before the end came, she 
prayed a most beautiful prayer, and 
then folded her hands across her 
breast and peacefully and calmly went 
to sleep in Jesus. 

About a year age she had a fall, be- 
cause of which she never walked any 
more. She often said she believed the 
Lord sent this for her good. She said 
to me, "I have read the New Testa- 
ment through 85 times, and I find new 
truth and beauty every time I read it." 
It was the custom of Sister Anderson 
to fast every Friday. She often said 
to me, "I am just waiting by the river; 
I can almost hear the boatman's oar." 

I can never forget the words of 
cheer and encouragement she spoke to 
me, as I visited her often during the 
last fourteen months. Her love and 
loyalty to the Methodist Church was 
wonderful. It has been said that she 
regarded a Methodist preacher as al- 
most an angel. When they built their 
fine old brick mansion, on the bluff 
overlooking the Dan River, years ago; 
she insisted that one room be set 
apart, and especially fitted up for the 
preacher's room. Since that time, 
many a weary itinerant has found rest 
and a welcome in this home. Two or 
three of the Bishops of our church 
have been entertained in this home, in 
years gone by. The old time ante 
bellum hospitalitty is still dispensed 
with a lavish hand. Mrs. Anderson 
was especially good to the poor and 
unfortunate, giving them food and 
clothing, and visiting the sick when 
she could do so. The funeral service 
was held in the home, Sunday, Janu- 
ary 10, at 1 o'clock, p. m. A large 
number came from Martinsville and 
Danville, Va., Winston-Salem and Mad- 
ison and the surrounding country to 
pay the last respects to her memory. 
The funeral service was conducted by 
the writer, assisted by Rev. A. R. Sur- 
ratt. One of the best friends a Meth- 
odist preacher ever had is gone. We 
do not hope to see her like again in 
this world. E. J. Poe. 

Positive proof from oldest Records 
that John baptized by Sprinkling. 68- 
in?e bnok. only 16 cents in stamps. 
Mahaffey Co., Box 12, Batesburg, S. C. 




THE GREATEST BIBLE BARGAIN 



A 

GENUINE 

7.50 



HOLM AN 

India Paper 
Self-Pronouncing 
BIBLE 



FOR ONLY 

4/jr- Carefully Wrapped 
■£0 and sent Postpaid 
in a box 



Authorized version, printed from the clearest type 
ever used In a Bible, lar&e bold face open print 
with liberal spacing between the words and lines 

PRINTED ON THE FINEST INDIA PAPER MADE 

The Text is Self-Pronouncing: with references. It has a new Concord 
ance, alphabetically arranged and with analytical nnd comparative 
features and 50,000 References also New Biblical Atlas with l*ifteen 
Colored Maps and Complete Index to Same. 

BOUND IN GENUINE PERSIAN MOROCCO, divinity circuit, 
full leather linings, silk sewed, silk head bands and 
marker, special flat opening reinforced binding that 
will not break In the back. 

The size is 6K x 8 inches-only one inch thick. 



This India Paper Bible Compared 
with one of ordinary paper, con- 
taining the same number of 
pases and same size type. 



iSpecwien of Type. 



17 IT m From that time Je'§ua be- 
gan to preach, and to Bay, n Repent : 
for the kingdom of heaven is at 



No. 700X K sher ' s 7*2 Said .or 4^5 



Address CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, Greensboro, N. C. 



Page Twelve 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January^ 21, 15 



The Sunday School Lesson 



FIRST QUARTER — LESSON IV — 
JANUARY 24, 1915 



GIDEON AND THE THREE HUN- 
DRED. JUDGES 7 



Golden Text — Not by might, nor by 
power, but by my Spirit, saith Jehovah 
of hosts. Zech. 4. 6. 



Summary of the Lesson 

"Come on, boys, we're going back!" 
shouted an intrepid Union commander 
in the Civil War to the demoralized 
soldiers whom he met flying from the 
scene of battle. They faced about at 
his words and the panic of defeat was 
changed into the enthusiasm of a vic- 
torious charge. The presence of one 
man had made the difference. It was 
not the quantity, but quality, which 
counted. Our study today has to do 
with the value of quality. By a proc 
ess of elimination of the unfit an army 
is reduced from thirty-two thousand to 
ten thousand. By further process of 
elimination it is reduced to three hun- 
dred fit and fearless men. Then a 
brilliant piece of strategy, under the 
blessing of Jehovah, brings a complete 
and decisive victory. 

The Army Which Was Too Large 

"For this world, the size of thiings; 
The sort of things, for that to come, 

no doubt," 
s'ays Prince Berthold in Robert Brown- 
ing's fascinating drama, "Golombe's 
Birthday," but even in this world 
sort rather than size is often the im- 
portant matter. Mere bulk does not 
necessarily mean dominant power. In 
fact, the matter of mass may become 
an embarrassment rather than a help. 
Gideon's army was too large. It had 
size rather than sort. It had quantity 
rather than quality. It was a great 
mob rather than an efficient fighting 
machine, so Gideon sent home the fear- 
ful and the trembling. More than two 
thirds of his host promptly vanished 
with this permission. Twenty-two 
thousand tremblers went home. When 
one thinks of the capacity for panic 
in twenty-two thousand tremblers he 
realizes how much stronger Gideon's 
army was after it was relieved of this 
mass of palpitating fear. Another test 
was applied to the ten thousand who 
remained. Ninety-seven one hun- 
dredths of them were sent to their 
tents! It really seemed as if Gideon 
was carrying the matter of elimina- 
tion too far. The vast hosts of the 
Midianites lay thickly in the valley, 
and Gideon prepared to meet them by 
discharging his soldiers in every di- 
rection. If his standard of efficiency 
and of fitness was so high that no- 
body would be left after his tests were 
applied, how would he fight the army 
of Midian? This was a crisis in the 
history of Israel and Gideon prepared 
to meet it with three hundred men, 
when he might have had ten thousand 
who professed no fear. We may sym- 
pathize with the reduction of the army 
from thirty-two thousand to ten thous- 
and, but does not its reduction to 
three hundred seem sheer madness? 

The Valiant Three Hundred 

Only three hundred! But such a 
three hundred! Men ready for any 
feat of daring! Men ready for the 
most difficult and hazardous and seem- 
ingly impossible enterprise! All the 
weakness and hesitation and vacilla- 
tion had been sent home. Only pure 
fighting quality, only the most daunt- 
less courage remained. Gideon and 
three hundred heroes were not to be 
despised, after all. 

We sometimes feel that the individ- 
ual is losing his place in the modern 
world. Machinery is becoming more 
: ' •nincant. Personality is becoming 
Jl ig significant, Thinking along these 



lines we become possessed of what 
Gerald Stanly Lee has called "the ma- 
chine scare." We contrast the "hand- 
made world" and the "machine-made 
world" and we are afraid of the latter, 
but we come at last to realize that 
the machines themselves are the 'crea- 
tion and the servants of men, and that 
they can be so used as to conserve 
manhood and not to crush it. "Per- 
haps the hand-made spirit is still liv- 
ing around me today, and is not only 
living, but is living in a more unspeak- 
able, unbounded body than any spirit 
has ever lived before, and is today be- 
fore our eyes, laying its huge fingers 
around our little earth, and holding 
the oceans in its hand, and brushing 
away mountains with a breath, until 
we have man at last playing all night 
through the sky, with visions and air- 
ships and telescopes. His very words 
walk on the air with soft and unseen 
feet." It is still men who count, and 
it is dauntless and fearless and orig- 
inal men who are most potent. Gid- 
eon and his three hundred have not 
lost their place in the modern world. 
They create machines; they utilize 
machines; they dominate masses of 
men, and in their newer, higher, more 
serviceable type, they are not only to 
command masses of men, but to save 
them from becoming human machines 
and to make them into a more potent 
manhood. 

The Fear of Midian 

"I am greatly afraid of fear," was 
the striking confession of a brave man. 
The fact of the matter is that fear is 
usually a great deal more dangerous 
than the thing of which we are afraid. 
Many a man has been defeated by his 
fear and not by his foe. 

When Gideon listened by the camp 
of the Midianites and heard the dream 
of one and the interpretation of an- 
other he knew that fear had come upon 
his enemies. With anxious mind and 
heavy of foot he had approached them, 
his senses oppressed by their vast 
numbers, but with exultant mind and 
light and eager feet he went away 
from their camp. He had heard his 
own name pronounced in tones of 
chattering fear. He knew that to the 
people of Midian he had become a 
chilling terror and a wild and dreadfu 
alarm. 

In truth by a process of elimination 
a great number of the Midianites 
should have been sent home. Mob 
terror was ready to spread through 
the camp; men were ready to rise and 
run at the slightest sound. The trem- 
bling and the fearing were all through 
the camp. Gideon had allies in the 
hearts of his foes. He had made an 
alliance with their fears and had em- 
ployed their dreams to be his men of 
battle. As a storm cloud covers the sky, 
so their anxiety was making the sky 
black. The stars were blotted out of 
the sky of the Midianite host as they 
lay trembling at the thought of Gideon. 

You must measure the strength of 
your foe not by his numbers or his 
armor, but by his stoutness of heart. 
So measured the foes of Israel were 
weak indeed. Every nerve thrilling 
with the anticipation of victory, his 
heart beating high with devotion to 
Jehovah, who had filled the minds of 
his foes with alarm, Gideon went from 
the camp of the Midianites back to his 
gallant three hundred. 

The Strategy of Gideon 

Tennyson has sung with immortal 
martial music the praises of six hun- 
dred men sent needlessly to certain 
defeat and death. In the case of Gid- 
eon's three hundred there was no need 
of a poet to lament in the midst of 
solemn words of praise that "some one 
had blundered." In this case nobody 
blundered. In fact, to speak quite ac- 
curately, there wag np oharpe, except 



the charge of pitchers flung to break 
upon the hill sides. There was an un- 
earthly crash of crockery, which sound- 
ed to the Midianites like the terrible 
approach of an invincible host. There 
was a blast of three hundred trumpets > 
there was the sudden flash of torches, 
gleamings as if to light upon its way 
an innumerable host. There was a 
shout of many voices, making the hill.- 
echo with the triumphant battle shout, 
"The sword of Jehovah and of Gid- 
eon!" In the midst of all these sights 
and sounds terror smote the hearts of 
the soldiers of Midian: Fear became 
,panic and they fled in wild confusion. 
In the darkness they smote each other, 
every man thinking that the foe was 
just at his side. The Midianites were 
defeated by their own fears, while the 
three hundred stood shouting and blow- 
ing their trumpets. For cool nerve the 
exploit of Gideon's little company of 
fit fighting men is unique. The rout 
of the hosts of Midian, pursued by 
their own ghastly fears, and smitten 
by their own hearts, is a terrible trav- 
esty, which tells much of the nature 
of men and of the nature of war. 

The Midianites were soon pursued by 
something more tangible than their 
own shadows. Israel mobilized for 
pursuit as it had not mobilized for 
battle. The defeat and humiliation 
and wreck of the Midianite army was 
complete. — Lynn H. Hough, D. D., in 
New York Christian Advocate. 



PLAN A BEAUTIFUL HOME WITH 
THIS FREE BOOK 

"Simple Plantings for Southern 
Homes" is a beautiful little book pub- 
lished to help home owners make their 
places more attractive. It shows by 
photographs some of the simple but ef- 
fective plans that have been followed by 
a number of Southern home owners. It 
tells what trees and plants were used, 
and how they were arranged. It shows 
the wonderful improvements that a few 
trees and plants, judiciously arranged, 
will make in the appearance of a home. 
The book is full of good ideas that you 
can use in making your own home more 
beautiful. Get a copy free by writing to 
the J. Van Lindley Nursery Co., Box D. 
203, Pomona, N. C. Ask for their latest 
catalogue, which contains full informa- 
tion on the care of trees and plants of 
all kinds. 



WANTED, Ford Owners ^ e w em ™il 

Simplex Self Starter." Ford cars only. No 
batteries,, springs, cables or other junk. 
Equal to any electric starter at one-fifth 
the price. Fully guaranteed. Shipped out 
on a week's trial. Sells on sight. Write 
quick. 

Simplex Manufacturing Co., 1551 Great 
Northern Building, Chicago 




THE CELEBRATED 

Throneburg Nursery 

solicits your trade on apple, 
peach, pear, shade and orna- 
mental trees. Prices reasonable. 
Agents wanted everywhere. Liberal commis- 
sions. JHE THRONEBURG NURSERY, NEWTON, N. C. 



Fruit All the Year 

Get a- few early Peaches, some mid- 
season Apples, Pears, Peaches, Plums, 
Grapes, then some winter Apples and 
Pecans, and you can have fresh fruit 
the year round. "Eat all you can, and 
can all you can't." 

Our catalog gives full information as 
to varieties. Prices always reasonable. 

Tell us your tree wants. We have 
them ready for you. Also Roses, 
Flowering Shrubs and other ornamen- 
tals. Immediate shipment if desired. 
Place order promptly. 

HOWARD NURSERY CO., 
Box J210 Stovall, N. C. 



GARTSIDE'S IRON RUST SOAP CO., 
4054 Lancaster Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Gartside's Iron Soap (U. S. registered 
,patent No. 3477) removes iron rust, ink 
and all unwashable stains from cloth- 
ing, marble, etc., with magical effect. 
Good seller, big margins. House-to- 
house agents and store salesman want- 
ed. The original, 25c a tube. Beware 
of infringements and the penalty for 
making, selling and using an infringed 
article, Suitable for church fairs, 



BEAUTIFUL 
FLORAL 
DESIGNS 

Furnished on short notic 




Summit Avenue Greenhouses 
HOWARD GARDNER 

Proprietor 

GREENSBORO, N. (| 



Office Phone 571 Res. Phone 131 



DR. C. W. MOSELEY 

DISEASES OF 
STOMACH AND INTESTINES 



121% So. Elm St., Greensboro, N. C 



The Newest Styles of Jewe 

WATCHES, STERLING SILVER 
AND PLATE WARE 

Clocks that will run and a large ass 
ment of Fine Pocket Books, Cut Qt 
ware and Ornaments. We are the ol 
leading firm In the city. Everything gi 
mteed. 

SCHIFFMAN JEWELRY C 

LEADING JEWELERS 




I 



PAINT 
STRENGTH 

Strength is what 
paint is for. The 
stronger it is, the 
less gallons and 
money it takes, 
and the longer it 
wears. The strong- 
, est paint-word is . 
DEVOE. 

ODELL 

Hardware Co. 



January 21, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Thirteen 



t 

Our Little Folks' Department 



MINDING BABY BLUE 

Baby Blue was down on the rug 
ironing her doll's apron. She was 
working away bravely with a toy flat- 
iron, which she rubbed hard now and 
then on a folded paper she had picked 
out of the woodbox. Grandmother 
Blue was spinning upstairs, and the 
Blue twins, Eva and Ted, were whis- 
pering together on the doorstep. 

"If we didn't have to mind Baby 
Blue," Eva said, "we could go down 
to the field and look for that lost deed. 
Grandpa thinks he dropped it out of 
his pocket while he was mowing down 
there this morning. He is going to 
give us fifty cents if we find it." 

"Grandma didn't say that we must 
stay with the bady every minute," ar- 
gued Ted. "She said just to look at 
her now and then and see if she is all 
right. Can you look at what she's do- 
ing now, Eva? Don't go in, because 
if she sees you she'll tease and cry to 
come with us." 

Eva craned her neck and peered in 
at the kitchen door. "She's playing 
on the rug as good as a kitten. 'Sh! 
Don't make a noise. We'll creep be- 
hind the woodpile, and then we'll run." 

In a few minutes the two children 
were scurrying down the long field to 
the place where grandpa had been 
mowing that morning. 

"Whew!" whistled Ted, pushing his 
hat back. "It's too hot to run." 

"We shan't mind the heat if only 
we can earn thai fifty cents," Eva de- 
clared. "Now, you know just how the 
deed looks, don't you, Ted? It's old 
and yellow, folded longways, and it's 
written in red ink. I don't see any- 
thing that looks like it, but we've got 
to hunt the whole field over." 

"It'll be like hunting for a needle 
in a haystack," grumbled Ted, turning 
over an armful of hay. 

The filed was thickly strewn with 
the new-mown grass, which lay just 
where it had fallen before the mowing 
machine. The lost paper might have 
dropped from grandpa's pocket (he had 
forgotten to take it out when he went 
to the field), and it might easily have 
fallen beneath the hay and been buried 
out of sight. There was nothing to do 
but to turn over and shake the whole 
of the hay. 

"No, sir, 'tisn't in this field; that's 
sure," declared Ted at last as he 
straightened his tired back. "Seems 
if grandpa must have dropped it in 
the road when he drove up home with 
the mowing machine." 

They followed the road home, though 
it was a much longer way than the 
path by which they had come across 
the field. They were fairly tired out 
when they turned into the shady gar- 
den. 

"No fifty cents for us," sighed Eva. 
"It's too bad not to find it when we've 
worked so hard." 

They tiptoed into the kitcneh, hop- 
ing that nothing had happened to Baby 
Blue. Perhaps it wasn't quite right to 
leave her that way when they had 
been told to "mind" her. But they 
wanted that fifty cents so much. 

Grandma's wheel was still humming 
upstairs, and Baby Blue was fast 
asleep on the rug. Beside her was 
the top flatiron standing in the mid- 
dle of the folded paper upon which 
she had been rubbing it — that paper 
she had picked out of the woodbox.. 

Eva's eyes flew wide open as she 
looked at this paper. It was old and 
yellow, folded longways, and written 
in red ink! 

"It's the lost deed, true as you live, 
Ted Blue!" The little girl sat down 
on the rug and wiped her hot face 
with her apron. "Next time," she said, 
"let's try just staying, at home and 
minding our own business first.": — Ma- 
bel S. Merrill. 



THE SHUT-INS 

"Hello, honey! Hello, honey! Come 
in, come in! O, must you go? Well, 
good-by! Good-by!" cried a shrill 
voice behind the lace curtains of the 
big square house on the corner. 

"A very impolite child lives in that 
house," said Patty severely. "I've nev- 
er seen it, but it calls out just so 
whenever I pass." 

Cousin Ruth, who was a little older, 
looked puzzled. "It does seem rude; 
but maybe it's a shut-in and lonesome." 

"What is a shut-in?" asked Patty. 

"People who are always sick or crip- 
pled and can't go out at all are called 
shut'ins," answered Ruth. "People 
take them things, books and flowers 
and read to them." 

Patty looked very sober. "Do you 
suppose it is a shut-in?" she asked. 
She was sorry that she had thought 
and said such unkind things about 
that strange voice. "Could we take it 
iruit jelly?" 

"How nice that would be! Aunt 
Nell said that she had made too much. ' 

They hurried home and presently 
came back again carrying a glass dish 
covered with a white napkin. 

"Won't it be surprised when it sees 
us turn in the gate?" chuckled Patty. 
They tapped softly on the screen door. 

"Come in! Come in! Come in!" 
cried the shrill voice. And Ruth gent- 
ly pulled the screen open. Through 
an archway they could look from the 
hall into a big living room; but there 
was nothing living in sight but a queer 
green and yellow bird walking along 
his perch upside down. Then a wheel- 
ed chair that had its back to them 
whirled suddenly, and there sat a 
smiling old lady. 

"Some one said, 'Come in.' We 
thought it was a shut-in," said Ruth. 

"It was my parrot, Jocko. I'm a 
little deaf and didn't hear you," laugh- 
ed the old lady. "But Jocko is a shut- 
in if ever there was one. We used to 
set his perch on the lawn, until a stray 
cat nearly killed him, and now he has 
to stay inside. My sailor brother gave 
him to me years ago. Jocko loves com- 
pany." 

"Hello, honey! O joy! Let a lit- 
tle sunshine in. Ha, ha, ha!" shrieked 
Jocko, while Ruth and Patty stared 
and laughed too. 

"We thought it was a child, and we 
brought him some fruit jelly," guggled 
Patty. 

How nice! Are there nuts in it? 
Jocko loves nuts." 

Ruth picked out the biggest pieces 
of walnut and gave them to Jocko, 
who ate them with cries of joy. "Joc- 
ko loves it, Jocko loves it!" he cackled 
between bursts of laughter. 

"I'll have the rest for my supper. 
I'm a shut-in too. I haven't walked 
a step for years," said the old lady, 
beaming as if being a shut-in was the 
pleasantest thing in the world. 

Then she wheeled herself rapidly 
around the room, showing the girls 
the curious things her brother had 
brought her and telling wonderful 
stories about them, until it was five 
o'cleck before they knew it. 

"Tea at five," chirped the old lady; 
and, sure enough, in came a neat maid 
with tea and cakes for the old lady 
and cakes and cocoa, with whipped 
cream on it, for the girls. 

"I've had such a good time," sighed 
Ruth as they took their leave. 

"So have I." chimed Patty. 

"I'm glad of that, because maybe 
you will come again. I get lonely 
sometimes, and so does Jocko. Jocko 
loves company." 

"Jocko loves it, Jocko loves it!" 
cried the bird|. 

"Indeed we will come often," ex- 
claimed Ruth and Patty, both at once. 

"O, must you go? Well, well! Good- 



by! Come again!" screamed Jocko as 
the screen closed behind them. — M. M. 
Parks. 



LITTLE GRAY MOUSE 

Little Gray Mouse sat on the door- 
step and sulked. Mother Mouse, busy 
about her work, smiled pleasantly at 
him each time she ran in or out of 
the house. But Little Gray Mouse, 
paying no heed, sulked on. He was 
very cross. 

Mother Mouse had taken him for a 
walk that morning, and on the way 
they met another little mouse who 
was out walking too. The strange 
mouse was just Little Gary Mouse's 
size, but he wore a coat of the whitest 
fUi" imaginable. 

And just there Little Gray Mouse's 
trouble began. He wanted a white 
coat too and teased his mother for 
one, even after she had patiently ex- 
plained again and again that he was 
asking an impossible thing. She told 
him that any well-cared-for mouse coat 
is handsome, no matter what its color. 
But he would not listen. 

While Little Gray Mouse sat pouting 
on his doorstep the big door of Polk's 
house slammed, and Little Boy ran out 
onto his doorstep. And Little Boy was 
wearing not his usual dark gray coat, 
but a new coat, and it was white and 
furry. 

Then Little Gray Mouse was angrier 
than ever. If another little mouse 
could wear a white coat all the time, 
and if a little boy could change from 
gray to white, why must he wear gray 
as long as he lived? He had never 
thought about it before today; but 
now that he did think about it, he was 
sure that he hated gray. 

And so he sat and sulked. Now, lit- 
tle mice that sulk and are angry in 
their hearts find it easy to do other 
naughty things. So when Mother 
Mouse went into the house to set the 
table for supper Little Gray Mouse 
started out for a walk all by himself, 
though he remembered very well that 
Mother Mouse had forbidden him to 
leave his own dooryard. 

Away he scampered out into Little 
Bay's playground, across Little Boy's 
father's garden, and right up to the 
porch of Folk's house. There was no 
one in sight now. Everything was 
very, very quiet. Next he climbed 
boldly , up the rose trellis onto the 
porch. 

There was nothing to be seen on 
the clean boards of the porch floor but 
an old sack that lay near the door; 
and sticking out from under one cor- 
ner of the sack was something that 
made Little Gray Mouse's heart beat 
with excitement. What was it? Why, 
just a tiny bit of fur; and it was white, 
as white as Little White Mouse's coat. 

Very quietly Little Gray Mouse 
crept close, and very quickly he made 
up his mind that now he too would 
have a white coat. He slipped stealth- 
ily under the soft fur; then with his 
sharp teeth he tried to draw it closely 
around him. 

Right then things began to happen 
— terrible things, thought Little Gray 
Mouse. There was an angry yelp, the 
seek flew up, and Little Gray Mouse 
was thrown halfway across the porch. 
With a frightened squeak he regained 
his feet, and O how he ran! Glancing 
back, he saw enough to understand 
what had happened. 

The bit of fur that he had tried to 
take was an ear of a small white puppy 
who had been taking a nap under the 
sack. Now the puppy whined as he 
rubbed the ear with his paw. The 
door of Folk's house opened, and some 
one came out on the porch. 

Then in his fright Little Gray Mouse 
found that he had forgotten the way 
home. Trembling with fear, he crouch- 
ed down in the grass and gave him- 
seli up for lost. 

Why, O why, he wondered, had he 
ever been so naughty? How he wished 
that he had stayed in his own door- 
yard! Now he could never find his 
way home again and never see Moth- 



POCKET BIBLES 




For those who object to carrying 
large Bibles these Editions are 
Thin, Light and very Compact. 

AUTHORIZED VERSION. Clear 
Black Print, on the finest 
Thin Paper made. 
All with the Button Flap Binding 
which gives an added advantage foi 
slipping in and out of the pocket. 

The leather cover extends com- 
pletely over the front edge and ia 
fastened on top with a button 
clasp as shown on illustration. 

Each containing a complete series 
of Colored Maps. 



Size. SV2 x J 1 2 in. Self- Pronouncing Agate 32mo 



N 



Specimen o/ZVpa. 

OW when Je'sus^was horn in 
Beth'le-nem of Ju-dia'a in the 



No. 1115F. French Seal, divinity circuit over- 
lapping covers, gold titles, silk head bands and silk 

marker, round corners, red gold edges. n 
Publishers Price, $1.50. Our Price, Postpaid, $I.2U 

Holman India Paper Pocket Text Bibles. 

Size. 3Vz x 5\'i inches, li of an inch in thickness. 

Weighs 7Vz ounces. Same Type as UI5F above. 
No. 1115XF. French Seal, divinity circuitover- 
lapping covers, gold titles, silk head bands and 
silk marker, round corners, red gold edges. 
Publishers Price, $2.40. Our Price, Postpaid, $1 .80 

No. 1130XF. Same as No. 1115X,with Extra 
Leather Linings. Publishers Price, $2.h0. 

Our Price, Postpaid, $A1 0 



POCKET REFERENCE BIBLES PRONOUNCING 

Old and New Testaments. Marginal References 
and Maps. Chapter headings on outside corner 
of each page making the Bible Self-Indexed. 



Specimen of Type 

19 »And the border of the Ca'- 
naan-ites was from Si'dfin, as thou 



Size, 4%-x.6V» inches. Minion 16mo. 

No. 1410F. French Seal, divinity circuit ovev- 
lappingcovers, round corners, redgoldedges. 
Publishers Price, $2.00. Our Price, Postpaid, $1.03 

Holman India Paper Pocket Reference Bibles. 
P onounclna, References, &c, same type as 1410F. 
Size, 4 % ix 6% inches. Minion 16mo. V* of an inch 
in thickness. Weighs 12Yz ounces. 

No. 1418XF. French SenI, divinity circuit over- 
lapping covers, head bands and marker, round 
corners, red gold edges. Publishers Price, „ 
$2.50. Our Price, Postpaid, $2.10 

No. 1430XF. Same as No. 1412XF with Extra 
Leather Linings. Publishers Price, $3.00 

Our Price, Postpaid, $2.50 

Address CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, 
Greensboro, N. C. 



,0 



WEBSTER'S 
NEW 
INTERNATIONAL 
DICTIONARY 

THE MERRIAM WEBSTER 

The Only New unabridged dic- 
tionary in many years. 

Contains the pith and essence 
of an authoritative library. 
Covers every field of knowl- 
edge. An Encyclopedia in a 
single book. 

The Only Dictionary with the 
New Divided Page. 

400,000 Words. 2700 Pages. 
6000 Illustrations. Cost nearly 
half a million dollars, 

Let us tell you about this most 
remarkable single volume. 

Write for sample 
pages, full par- 
ticulars, etc. 
Name this 
paper and 
we will 
send free 
a set of 
Pocket 
Maps 




er Mousa again! 

Then, just at that unhappy moment, 
he saw a flash of something that his 
troubled heart knew was surely the 
most beautiful color in all the world — ■ 
the gray of his mother's coat. With- 
out a word she led him home and gave 
him his supper. 

After supper she sat down by the 
fireplace, as usual, to wash and smooth 
her fur. Tonight Little Gray Mouse 
came without being reminded even 
once, and, sitting beside her, washed 
and smoothed his coat long and care- 
fully and whispered in her ear a wish 
for a coat as beautiful as hers. And 
Mother Mouse understood and freely 
forgave him. — Mary Ritchie Ward. 



Page Fourteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 21, 19: 



'. '. Our Children's Home 

! ! Conducted by Walter Thompson, Supt. 
♦ 

JANUARY 31 IS THE 5th SUNDAY 

We are sending out considerable 
matter advertising the 5th Sunday col- 
lections. The calls on us are numer- 
ous and pressing. It takes money to 
meet them. Kindly give the Home a 
generous offering. 



FIFTH SUNDAY COLLECTIONS 

Cedar Valley S. S., Lenoir, D. C. 
Flowers, $2.00; Liberty S. S., Mocks- 
ville Ct., Mocksville, W. H. Hobson, 
$2.20; Salem S. S., Albemarle, W. I. 
Hatley, $3.43. Total, $7.63. 

RECEIVED ON SPECIAL, GENERAL 
AND TEN PER CENT. COL- 
LECTIONS 

West End Church, Winston, M. D. 
Stockton, $180.00; Summerfleld Charge, 
Summerfield, T. B. Johnson, $6.00; 
Wadesboro Methodist Church, Wades- 
boro, Geo. D. Herman, $60.00; J. T. 
Lambert, Moffit, $2.50; Hendersonville 
Station, Asheville Ct., Hendersonville, 
W. F. Womble, $10.83. Total, $259.3o. 



DONATIONS IN KIND 

M. E. Church, Franklinville, N. C, 2 
aprons, 3 pairs hose, gingham and 
percal. 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER 

The last and short session of the 
63rd Congress is just half through and 
practically no legislation completed — 
not even the annual appropriation bills 
which would indicate that an extra ses- 
sion might be possible. However, 
night sessions and less unnecessary 
discussion of unimportant questions 
would relieve the situation. Senator 
Shepherd's recent amendment to the 
District of Columbia appropriation bill 
abolishing saloons from the Nation's 
Capital is provoking animated discus- 
sion in the upper chamber. The meas- 
ure has many advocates and the city 
churches adopted resolutions yesterday 
urging its adoption, but it is feared 
that the united forces of the liquor ele- 
ment with their barrels of cash and 
liquid stimulants may finally wield the 
greater power and influence. 

In the interest of sobriety and moral- 
ity the celebrated baseball evangelist, 
"Billy" Sunday, who has just held a 
most successful revival in Philadelphia, 
will speak in Washington Monday, Jan- 
uary 18. Tickets have been issued to 
10,000 persons, but several times that 
number would attend the meeting were 
not the capacity of the hall limited to 
10,000. He may be induced to hold a 
revival here at a later date. Within 
the writer's sojourn at the National 
Capital is gratifying to note that the 
number of saloons have been reduced 
from more than 600 to less than 300, 
but the good people here will not be 
satisfied until this fair city joins the 
Southland for total prohibition. 

W. F. Tomlinson, 

The Hillside, Jan. 18, 1915. 



God bless the cheerful people — man, 
woman, or child, old or young, illiter- 
ate or educated, handsome or homely. 
Over and above every other social 
trait stands cheerfulness. What the 
sun is to nature, what God is to the 
stricken heart which knows how to 
lean upon Him, are cheerful persons 
in the house and by the wayside. — 
A. A. Willets. 



Our Foreign Advertising is in Charge of 
Jacobs & Co., Clinton, S. C, 

SOLICITING OFFICES: 

New York— 118 K. 28th St E. L. Gould 

Chicago — 420 Advertising Bldg.— W. B. Porcher 

Octroi t— Hotel Toller C. L. Wlun 

St. Ivouls— 1500 Central Natl, liank ISldif., 

M. K. Onmrrion 

Nashville— 161 8th Ave. N .7. M. Riddle, Jr. 

Atlanta— Wesley jMemorhi I Bldg,. .J. B. KeoUgb 

Asheville, N. C— 121 H. Main Ht <). H. LigOn 

Philadelphia— M2I Arch Ht A. O'Danlol 

Richmond, V&.— Murphy Hotel.. .J< W. Ugou 



The Christian Advocate Offers You 

This Well Known Bible Dictionary 

SEE SPECIAL OFFER BELOW 

Realizing the wide demand that exists among our constituents for this Bible Dictionary, we have 
made a special arrangement with the publishers of the work by which they agreed to supply it to 
Have your friends take advan- ^ggff us on exceptional terms, provided we 

tage of this special offer ^-ajflff**^ WOuM Wlddy advertise lt > and this 

as well as ^ttttS^ * ^^^M enaD ^ es us to offer this well-known 

yourself ^esSf ^-dStitBSmSSBM Bible Dictionary in its original form 

and with all its important features, 
including over 400 illustrations and 
maps in colors, at less than half the 
regular price. 

THE FATHER OF ALL BIBLE 
DICTIONARIES 

Everyone acknowledges the superior 
value of Dr. William Smith's Bible Dic- 
tionary, ascontaining thefruitof theripest 
Biblical scholarship. It is practically the 
foundation, or father, of all other Bible 
Dictionaries. This late edition is brought 
down to the twentieth century and thor- 
oughly revised to incorporate modern re- 
search and discoveries in Bible lands. It 
has been adapted in its present form to the 
convenience of teachers and scholars. 

MAKES BIBLE STUDY EASY. 
MAKES THE BIBLE PLAIN 
TO EVERY READER 

This Bible Dictionary is a veritable 
treasure to Christian Workers. It contains - 
in the simplest language a full explanation 
of all topics mentioned in the Bible— every 
place, nation, tribe, person, and historical 
event; every custom and rite; every instru- 
ment and implement ; every animal , plant , 
flower, mineral, metal, etc. It is a system- 
atic collation of all the facts recorded in 
the Bible, supplemented and explained by 
materials supplied from authentic records 
of Biblical times. It gives in compact and 
lucid form the substance of the result of 

?rofound Biblical scholarship and research. 
T OPENS A NEW UNDERSTAND- 
ING AND APPRECIATION OF THE 
BIBLE IN A WAY THAT NO OTHER 
BOOK DOES. 




This is a reduced 
photograph of the 
complete book 
which is 5 J x 7| inches in size 
and contains 834 pages, 440 
illustrations and 16 maps 
printed in colors. Bound in 
Cloth, gold and ink stamping 



Our Special Offer 

From this till March first 
we offer the Advocate one 
year and this dictionary for 

$2.50 

This applies to new subscrib- 
ers and renewals. 



Address«CHRISTlAN ADVOCATE, GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Peach and Apple 
Trees 2c and up 

Pear, Cherry, Plum, Grapes, Strawber- 
ry, etc. Catalog Free. TENN. NUR- 
SERY CO., Box 60, Cleveland, Tenn. 



THI8 SPACE BELONGS TO 



ROBT. W.MURRAY 

GENERAL 

INSURANCE 



Gree&skore, North Carolina 

308 !/ 2 South Elm 8t. 
Phone 163 



MILLER, ROBINS & WEILL 

Goatral Insurance 

General Agents Fidelity and 
Depoelt Company ef Maryland 

108 North Elm 8treet 'Phone 44 




You The The The 
Decide: School: Methods: Result 



sons Why You Should Enroll With I 



tenotypy, the fastest method of writing. Our courses teach you 
'in you to grasp your opportunity. Latest improved methods. 'Yc 
different systems of shorthand, two of them hold world's record i 
ccuracy. ■*( 

S and terms most reasonable. Real business courses as taught at a r< 
liege. Results unequalled. Twenty-five students recently placed 

' further information and terms. Do not put off this important step. 

CENTAL BUSINESS COLLEGE, ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 

T S. SPRADUN, President 



Methodist Benevolent Association 

A Mutual Benefit Brotherhood for Southern Methodists. Issues WholeLl 
N-Premium Life, Term to 60, and Disability-Old Age Certificates. Benefits, 
death, disability, or old age. $150, 000 paid widows, orphans, disabled. Resei 
$30,000. For terms, etc., write J. H. SHUMAKER, Sec'y, Nashville, Tei 



Sweeter, 
richer, in tone, 
more durable, 
lower once, un. 
like other bells. 
Our free catalog 

tells why 



B 




Church Bell o' 
reputation. On 
approval and 
liberal terms 

The Cincinnati bfll 
Founohv COMPANY. 



WE PAY $80 A MONTH SALARY 

ana furnish rig and all axpanaaa to Introduca aur 

Buarantaad paultiy and .tock powdara. Addraae 
ItSLER COMPANY, X 708. SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



HELP WANTED LADIES 

Ladies of character may earn nice 
come at home every month taking brd 
from friends for REIF'S high class To 
Articles, Fairy Creme, Perfume, Food F 
vorlng Extracts and full line. Llbe 
commission paid. This is for married 
single women, young or old. Referen 
required. Get our free Instruction bo 
We teach you how to succeed from 
start. Honorable, dignified work. Wt 
now and get territory and beautiful sa 
pla case. 

United Storea Drug Co., 813 Cherry Stn 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 



January 21, 1915 



NOKTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Fifteen 



Quarterly Meetings 

ASHEVILLE DISTRICT— C. A. Wood, 
Presiding Elder, Weavervllle, N. C 

First Round 

January 

Fairview, Tweeds 23-24 

North Asheville, nisht 24 

Walnut, Jewel Hill 30-31 

Hot Sp'gs and Marshall, Marshall, nigfit 31 

February 

Sulphur Springs, Laurel Hill *-7 

West Asheville, night 7 

Swannanoa, Swannanoa 13-14 

Black Mountain, night 14 

Weavervllle Ct., Flint Hill 20-21 

Bethel, night 21 



CHARLOTTE DISTRICT— J. C. Rowe, 
Presiding Elder, Charlotte, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Morven, Bethel 24-26 

Wadesboro, Wadesboro, night 25 

Pelkton, Peachland 30 

Lilesvllle, Lilesville 31 

February 

Ansonvllle, Ansonvllle C-7 

Waxhaw, Waxhaw 13-14 

Spencer Memorial 21 



GREENSBORO DISTRICT— J. H. Weav- 
er, Presiding Elder, Greensboro, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Randleman and Naomi, St. Paul ..23-24 

Asheboro 24-25 

Uwharrie Ct., Concord 30-31 

Denton Ct., Denton 31-1 

February 

Deep River, Cedar Falls J-7 

West Market 13-14 



MT. AIRY DISTRICT— H. C. Sprinkle, 
Presiding Elder, Wit. Airy, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Tadkinville, Prospect 23-24 

Elkin, night 29-81 

Jonesvllle 30-31 

February 

Dobson, Stony Knoll *-7 

Pilot Mountain, Pilot Mountain 13-14 

Ararat, Chestnut Grove 20-21 

Mt. Airy Ct., Zion 27-28 



NORTH WILKESBORO DISTRICT— J. H. 
Bennett, Presiding Elder, North 
Wllkesboro, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Watauga, Henson's Chapel 23-24 

Elk Park, Elk Park 30-31 

February 

Avery, Fairview S-7 

Boone, Rutherwood 13-14 

Laurel Springs, Transon 20-21 

Sparta, Potato Creek 27-28 

Revival Meetings 

January 

Creston, Creston 14-21 

, February 

Avery, Fairview 2-11 

Laurel Springs, Transon 16-23 



SALISBURY DISTRICT— W. R. Ware, 
Presiding Elder, Salisbury, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Bethel and Love's Chapel, Bethel ..28-24 

Concord, Westford, night 24 

Gold Hill Ct., Gold Hill 30-31 

New London Ct., New London . . . .30-febl 



STATESVI LLE DISTRICT— L. T. Mann, 
Presiding Elder, Statesvllle, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Hickory Ct., Marvin, 11 a. m 23-24 

Catawba Ct., Catawba, night 24-25 

Statesvllle Ct., N. S'ville, 11 a. m., 30-31 
Broad St., Broad St., night 31-Feb. 1 

February 

Mt. Zion and Huntersville, Mt. Zion, 

11 a. m 6-7 

Davidson, Davidson, night 7-8 

Mooresville Ct., Fair "View, 11 a. m., 13-14 
Mooresville Sta., Mooresville, night, 14-15 
Cool Spring Ct., Cool Spg., 11 a. m., 20-21 
Troutman Ct., Shepherds, 11 a. m., 27-28 



SHELBY DISTRICT— J. R. Scroygs. Pre- 
siding Elder, Shelby, N. C 
First Round 

January 

Crouse, Crouse 23 

Stanly, Stanly 24-25 

Shelby Ct., Sharon 30 

Second Round 

February 

Dallas and Ozark, Dallas 6 

West End, Franklin Avenue 6 

Gastonia, Main Street 7-8 

Lowesville, Snow Hill 13-14 

Mt. Holly, Mt. Island 14-15 

Bessemer, Concord 20-21 

King's Mountain, King's Mountain 21 

Belwood, Kadish 27-28 

March 

Polkville, Polkville t 6-7 



Lowell, Lowell 13-14 

McAdenville, McAdenville 14 1 

Rock Spring, Mt. Pleasant 20-21 



MORGANTON DISTRICT— J. E. Gay, 
Presiding Elder, Marlon, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Cliffslde, Cliffslde 23-24 

Morganten Ct., Salem 30-31 

Connelly Springs, Rutherford College, 

Sl-Feb.l 
February 

Spruce Pine and Bakersville, Spruce 

Pine 5-7 

Micaville, South Toe 6-7 

Bald Creek, Bald Creek 18-14 

Burnsville 14-15 

Marlon Ct., Green Mountain 20-21 




WAYNESVILLE DISTRICT— L. T. Cor- 
dell, Presiding Elder, Asheville, N. C, 
R. F. D. No. 2 
First Round 

January 

Hayesvllle Ct., Oak Forest 23-24 

Murphy Ct., Temotla 27-28 

Ranger Ct., Salem 29-80 

Murphy Station 31 

February 

Judson Ct., Maple Springs 2-3 

Robbinsville Ct., Robblnsville 4-5 | 

Andrews Station 6-7 

Macon Ct., Unien 13-14 | 

Franklin Ct., Salem 16-17 

Highlands Ct., Highlands 18-19 

Franklin Station 21-22 



WINSTON DISTRICT— H. K. Boyer, 
Presiding Elder, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Davie, -Oak Grave 23-24 

Coeleemee, night 24 

Lewisville, Sharon 39-31 J 

February j 

Kernersville, Kernersville S-7 j 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 
N. ».— Following schedule figures axe 

published only as information and are 
not guaranteed. 

12:15 a. m. — No 32 dally Southern's 
Southeastern Limited. Pullman drawing- 
room, open section sleeping cars Jack- 
sonville and Augusta to New Tork. Din- 
ing car service. Day coaches. 

12:35 a. m. — No. 112, daily, local for 
Raleigh, Selma and Goldsboro. Pullman 
sleeping car Winston-Salem to Raleigh 
which is ©pen at 9:39 and may be occu- 
pied in Raleigh until 7 a. m. 

1:42 a. m.— No. 30, daily, Birmingham 
Special. Pullman drawing-room and ob- 
servation sleeping cars Birmingham and 
Columbus to New Tork, and Birmingham 
to Richmond. Dining car service. Day 
coaches. 

1:50 a. m. — No. 29 daily, Birmingham 
Special. Pullman drawing-room and ob- 
servation sleeping cars New York and 
Richmond to Birmingham and Columbus. 
Daily tourist car Washington to San 
Francisco via popular Sunset Route. Din- 
ing cars. Coaches. 

3:15 a. m. — No. 31 dally. The Southern's 
Southeastern Limited. Pullman drawing- 
room and open section sleeping cars New 
Tork to Jacksonville and Augusta. Din- 
ing car service. Day coaches. 

3:45 a. m.— No. 46 dally, local for Char- 
lotte, connecting for Atlanta and points 
south. 

7:10 a. m. — No. 8 dally, local for Rich- 
mond. 

7:15 a. m.— No. 37 dally, New Tork, At- 
lanta and New Orleans Limited. Solid 
Pullman train with observation and open 
section sleeping cars New Tork to New 
Orleans, and Now Tork to Asheville, and 
Macon. Pullman parlor car Greensbero 
to Mentgomery. Club car Washington to 
Montgomery. Dining car service. 

7:30 a. m.— No. 198 daily, local for Ral- 
eigh, Selma, and Goldsboro. 

7:40 a. m. — No. 154 dally, except Sunday 
for Ramseur. 

7:25 a. m. — No. 11, dally, local for At- 
lanta.. Pullman sleeping cars Norfolk and 
Richmond to Charotte. Day coaches. 

8:15 a. m.— No. 237, dally, for Winston- 
Salem and North Wllkesboro. Pullman 
sleeping car Raleigh to Winston -Salem. 

8:20 a. m.— No. 133, daily, local for Mt. 
Airy. 

9:30 a. m.— No. 44, dally, for Washing- 
ton and points north. 

9:40 a. m.— No. 144, daily, Raleigh, Sel- 
ma and Goldsboro Pullman sleeping car 
Atlanta to Raleigh. 

12:39 p. m.— No. 21, daily, for Asheville 
and Waynesvllle, connecting at Asheville 
with Carolina Special for all points west. 
Chair car Goldsboro to Asheville. 

12:65 p. m.— No. 139, daily, local for San- 
ford, Fayetteville and Wilmington. 

1:30 p. m. — No. 7, daily, local for Char- 
lotte, connecting for Seneca and Colum- 
bia. 

1:80 p. m.— No. 86, daily U. S. Fast Mail 
fer Washington, New Tork and points 
north. Pullman sleeping cars New Or- 
leans and Birmingham to New Tork. Din- 
ing car service. Day coaches. 

2:00 p. m. — No. 207, daily, for Winston- 
Salem, connecting daily except Sunday for 
North Wllkesboro. 

2:30 p. m.— No. 151, daily, except Sun- 
day for MadlsM. 

3:30 p. m. — No. 230, daily, except Sun- 
day for Ramseur. 

4:15 p. m.— No. 22, daily, for Raleigh, 
Selma and Goldsboro. Chair car. 

5:05 p. m.— No. 131, daily, for Mt. Airy. 

6:26 p. m.— No. 85, daily, U. S. Fast 
Mail, for Atlanta, Now Orleans and Bir- 
mingham. Pullman sleeping cars New . 
Tork to New Orleans and Birmingham. I 
Dining car service. Day coaches. I 



Early 
"Jersey Wakefield 




Charleston Large 
Type Wakefield 



GROWN FROM EXPENSIVE SEED 

I pay from three to five times as much for Peter 
Henderson & Co.'s seed as other planters pay fur 
ordinary seed. Actual figures, $3.50 per lb. for 
i Wakeflelds, $4.00 per lb. for Flat Dutch, against 75c. per lb. for ordinary seed. 
| My customers get the benefit in 

PERFECT PLANTS AT NO EXTRA COST 

Why not plant cabbage grown from high-grade seed and raise a successful crop, 
rather than use plants from inferior seed and be disappointed in the results? It 
costs no more. 

Il l am out of the variety you want I will tell you. I NEVER SUBSTITUTE EX- 
CEPT WHEN REQUESTED BY THE PURCHASER. 
! Prices by Express: 1,000 to 4,000, $1.50 per 1,000; 5,000 to 9,000, $1.25 per 1,000: 10,000 or 
over $1,00 per 1,000. 

Varieties: Early Jersey Wakefield, Charleston 
Wakefield, Henderson's Succession, Flat Dutch, 
A!'. Frost Proof. Order early to be sure of the 
variety you want. 

2,000 bushels Harrison's Selected Seed Corn, 
$2.00 per bushe F. O. B. Charleston, S. C. 



JOS. M: HARRISON 

CHARLESTON. S.C, 





HOW ABOUT YOUR 

Dry Cleaning and Dyeing? 

We have the best dyers and cleaners in the 
South and make a specialty of FAULTLESS 
DRY CLEANING and DYEING. :: :: :: 

If you desire good work and prompr atten- 
tion we are at your command, :: :: :: 

Mail orders given prompt attention 

The Charlotte Laundry 

OLDEST LARGEST — BEST 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



GREENSBORO NURSERIES 

AGENTS WANTED 

For Fruit, Shade and Ornamental Trees, Vines and Plants. 

JOHN A. YOUNG & SONS, Greensboro, N. C. 



m Exceptional Bible Offer 



Endorsed by Representatives of all denominations 



Being the old familiar Authorized Version, 
carefully amended by American scholars in 
the light of the latest modern scholarship. 

Not a Revision 

Only such passages as are recognized by all scholars 
as needlessly obscure have been altered in any way. 

Special Features 

A New System of Chain References. „• 
A New System of Collected References.^ 
A New System of Paragraphs. 

" We believe, unqualifiedly, that the iqii Bible is far the best trans- 
lation ever given the English-speaking people, and the worthiest" 
of their confidence and affection."— herald and Presbyter. 

Printed in large black-faced type, very easy to read 



Special Often 



For $2.00 



we will send you, postpaid, a copy of this superb Bible, 
beautifully printed in large black-face type, and bound 
in the best French morocco, with overlapping edges, 
round corners, red under gold edges, headband, and fine silk marker. This Bible con- 
tains 12 beautifully colored Maps, and Index to Maps. 

Size, 8x5^ inches. 

r " e v, ''l s er| d you, postpaid, the exquisite Oxford India 

^mMMwM ? aper edi '""» of this Bible, which measures only % of an 
inch in thickness. It is bound in the finest Alaska seal, 
with overlapping edges, full leather lined to edge, si'k sewed, round corners, red under 
gold edges, and has silk headband and marker. 

Size, 8x5% inches, % of an inch thick. 1 
Remember 1 1 These Bibles are published by the Oxford University Press, American 
Branch— in itself a sufficient guarantee of their excellence. 

Send for one of these Bibles to-day 

Address CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, Greensboro, N. C. 



Page Sixteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 21, 19 



PUBLISHER'S MESSAGE 

A TALK ABOUT BUSINESS 

AND PLEA FOR CO-OPERATION 



One would suppose that it would just be a delight to 
the Methodist business man in Western North Carolina 
to patronize the North Carolina Christian Advocate. Both 
the Advertising and Job Printing departments should ap- 
peal to these men. We believe this will be the case when 
attention is persistently called to it. Notwithstanding we 
have had a good deal to say" from time to time, it is still 
true that many of our people have not fully realized the 
value of the Advocate as 

An Advertising Medium 

If our merchants, manufacturers, farmers and business 
men generally could be induced to try it we have no 
doubt they would be amply repaid for money paid in ex- 
change for our advertising space.. There ought to be a 
regular col umn filled with classified or want ads. and we 
hope to get our people who want anything or who have 
anything to sell to use the Advocate space and thus help 
their own business while helping to support an important 
institution of the church. For years a few of our enter- 
prising business men have appreciated the Advocate as an 
advertising medium, but the great majority of them need 
yet to have their attention called to this. While throwing 
away vast sums of money on various advertising schemes 
presented by the promoter, they let this really rich op- 
portunity go by unimproved. 

We have purged our columns of all advertising which 
can not be rated as first class and clean in every respect 
and this itself greatly enhances the value of our space. 

Again, there are hundreds of business men all over 
our section who have large quantities of printing done. 
They could turn much of this our way just as well, and 
many could turn all their job work into our house. 

We are Equipped 

for all kinds of job printing, especially pamphlets and 
commercial work, and this would help the Board of Publi- 
cation very much in its efforts to establish firmly the busi- 
ness and make a great paper for the Conference. The 
members of this Board give their time and thought to 
this business without charge or hope of remuneration — 
their work is a labor of love. They feel the more free to 
appeal to 

Methodist Business Men 

to think of our Advocate printing house in Greensboro 
when they need anything in that line, and if they can get 
what they want we feel sure they will take pleasure in 
turning patronage this way. Just think of it 

The Stationery of Our Country Stores 

would make a nice business for our Job Department and 
would well-nigh keep our presses busy ! ! 

Then think of the physicians, lawyers, preachers and 
other professional men who use printed stationery and 
other printed matter, besides printing for the churches 
and church organizations. Of course we do not expect a 
monopoly of all this business, and we are already getting 
a goodly share ; but there are many who have never had 



their attention called specially to this, and with a little 
more thoughtfulness our business ought easily to be dou- 
bled, especially in the line of commercial work. It is 
evident that we need 

More Diligent Co-operation 

While any church business enterprise must depend 
mainly upon those who have charge, and cannot be 
allowed to depend upon such patronage as church loyalty 
alone would bring, it is nevertheless true that much de- 
pends upon that spirit 'of co-operation which church 
loyalty suggests and prompts. There are a few country 
merchants who have sent us their orders for stationery 
regularly since we began work in that line. They seem 
to be pleased, our business is benefited and we very 
greatly appreciate their spirit of co-operation. 

A large manufacturer in one of our thriving towns, 
after hearing the editor at a District Conference last 
year, frankly stated that he had not had his attention 
called to this before and that he had quite a good deal 
of work that, everything else being equal, he would be 
glad to turn our way. Since that time we have been 
getting nice orders occasionally, and if fifty or seventy- 
five more, who no doubt are in the same position, 
would do likewise, most of our problems would be 
solved, for the reason that this additional work would 
be handled without appreciable increase in our pay- 
roll. 

The Sale of Books 

For some two years or more we have been handling 
books in a small way. Most of this is purely a mail order 
business. We have arrangements with publishers to fill 
our orders, and allow us the trade discount j so, without 
paying any more for books our people can send their 
orders through us and thus add quite a little item to 
our income. The only difference to the purchaser would 
be a delay of about one day. This applies to orders 
from Smith & Lamar, or any publishers in the United 
States. We hope to have the co-operation of our people 
in this respect also. We ought to co-operate in an ef- 
fort to put more good books into the hands of our peo- 
ple. Nothing is needed more today than the turning of 
the minds of our people into the channels of more 
serious and profitable thought. Good books will do this. 

Church Supplies 

Record books for Quarterly Conference, Church Con- 
ference, Sunday Schools, Baraca and Philathea Classes, 
etc., Bibles and Disciplines can be secured through us at 
the same prices charged by our Publishing House and 
other dealers. Why not turn the trade commission or 
discount into our own treasury? 

We take it that the Board need offer no apology for 
thus going into details in order to show our people of 
this opportunity for profitable and helpful co-operation. 

For further information write 

BOARD OF PUBLICATION, 

Greensboro, N. C. 



nortl) Carolina 



Man 




Advocate 



Volume LX 



Official Oigan of tte Vkmn Bortb arolinaeonfeTe^ 
IHetboaist episcopal £DurcD,$outl) 



Greensboro, N. C, Thursday, January , ' .i'915 



Humanity Weary of Philosophies 



\TO OPPORTUNITY in the world today 
* is greater than that which is offered the 
Christian church to substitute a Saviour for 
a speculation. Humanity is weary of phi- 
losophies. It has been overfed with them 
for milleniums, and they do not satisfy. 
When it comes to matching philosophical 
systems, the east can hold its own with the 
west; yet the east is crying aloud for deliv- 
erance from an intolerable lot. What it 
wants, and what Christianity has to give, is 
a personal Redeemer, Jesus Christ, who be- 
comes a new force and a saving power in 
the life of every person and nation that ac- 
cept him. The Christ who was born in 
Asia satisfied the whole world s need. In 
every nation there are now those who can 
joyfully testify that Jesus has satisfied the 
deepest yearnings of their souls; and that he 
has likewise created new longings of which 
he himself is the satisfaction William T. Ellis. 



Number 4 





Page Two 



January 28, 19 



North Carolina Christian Advocate 



Entered at the Post Office at Greensboro, N. C, as 
mail matter of the second class. 



HUGH M. BLAIR, - - - - 


Editor 


i 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 












To all preachers of the Gospel, per year 


1.9b 


Make all remittances to 





Christian Advocate, - Greensboro, N. C. 



NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

It is not our custom to discontinue subscriptions 
when the time paid for expires, without notice. Sub- 
scribers who do not wish the paper continued should 
send notice to discontinue direct to the office. Oth- 
erwise they will be expected to pay for the paper 



THE ADVOCATE CAMPAIGN 

The inclement weather has interfered with 
all plans, and the Advocate campaign in par- 
ticular. We are not discouraged, however, since 
many pastors write that they are going ahead 
as rapidly as the weather will permit. This 
is the spirit that will ultimately win the vic- 
tory. Let the ball roll right along. 

PRAY FOR THE REVIVAL 

Many of our people are feeling as never be- 
fore the need of a revival. They are talking 
about the need of it. Some are deploring the 
lack of interest in those forms of religious ser- 
vice which are intended to promote a deeper 
personal experience. Unfortunately some are 
inclined to take a pessimistic view of the con- 
ditions. 

We do not think that, with all that there is to 
discourage, the gloomy view is at all justified. 
The forces of righteousness are strong, and 
there never was a time when we had greater 
reason to hope for the rallying of these forces in 
an aggressive campaign against the powers of 
evil. What we need, at least for a time, is the 
concentration of thought and effort upon the 
matter of personal religious experience. In all 
the busy life of looking after the matter of so- 
cial welfare, we sometimes overlook the means 
of grace which are essential to replenish the 
inner life, and it is worth while to turn aside oc- 
casionally and rest awhile. 

Business and the demands of social life may 
have encroached upon the spiritual demands of 
our being. How easy it is for us to be so busy 
with the affairs of secular or social life as to for- 
get the essential program of religious life ! We 
are sure that one of the insistent reasons for the 
call for revival is that many have, through these 
things, gone much farther away from God than 
they really know. They must be awakened, and 
nothing except the extraordinary in religious 
zeal and power can accomplish this. 

To adopt the language of a great religious 
leader: "We must have a revival that will 
mightily move the pulpit, convict sinners, re- 
store backsliders, rebuild family altars, purge 
away social uncleanness, heal feuds, promote 
brotherly love, enforce business honesty, untie 
purse strings, drive out the love of luxury, pro- 
mote the spirit of self-sacrifice, unloose the 
tongue of dumb saints, baptize the people with 
fire, and gird the Church with the power of a 
new Pentecost. Any other kind of a revival 
will not meet the emergency which is upon us. 
O Lord, give to thy Church a revival!" 

Will not every reader of the Advocate join 
in this prayer? This is one way by which all 
may take a very important part in promoting 
the revival. 



THE BASIS OF EFFECTIVE 
EVANGELISM 

A consciousness of the divine call constitutes 
the foundation of an effective evangelism. 
Those who go forth to a successful ministry of 
the word must first have enquired seriously for 
the revelation of the divine will. In response to 
this they must have, through the ear of the soul, 
heard the command to go forward. This in- 
quiry- always implies willingness, if not eager- 
ness, to go. Isaiah gives us an example of the 
method by which God calls men to the prophetic 
office. Let it be understood, moreover, that 
there is no essential difference in the prophetic 



office in ■qijl dispensations. The prophet of God 
in Isaiah's time was one called and annointed 
of God to be a preacher of righteousness; and 
such is the Christian minister of our own time. 

The call to Isaiah came in a vision. This vis- 
ion was concerning Judah and Jerusalem in tne 
days of Uziah, Jotham, Ahaz and Hezekiah. A 
glimpse at 'the history of the time as well as 
Isaiah's own description, shows that the matter 
revealed to the prophet— the burden as other 
prophets expressed, it — was the moral degener- 
ii cy of the people. The call to the ministry be- 
gins with the vision of moral and religious de- 
cay. This lays upon the heart of the prophet or 
minister an overburdening sense of the necessity 
that some one should go as a messenger of sal- 
vation. This conviction leads to inquiry — to 
the introspection of the individual. Thus the 
way is paved for another vision — a vision of 
God in all the glory and perfection of His char- 
acter, and by contrast, a vision of self in all 
the deformity of sin. This vision came to Isaiah 
in the year that King Uzziah died. (Isa. 6:1). 
The Lord, enthroned in majesty and power, 
amid the company of glorified spirits, appeared ; 
and immediately Isaiah cried out because his 
own depravity had been revealed to him. He 
saw not only the moral degeneracy of the men 
of his time, but his own uncleanness and conse- 
quent unfitness for the work of a reformer and 
the promoter of the needed evangelism. 

No man is fit to lead a reformation who has 
not himself been reformed and purified. The 
ideal evangelist is the man who, in a mighty 
upheaval 1 of spiritual forces, has had a vision 
of God .and of self, and who in outcry of soul 
by confession and repentance, has come into 
conscious^,- contact with the power that purifies 
and heals. "Woe is me," cries the awakened 
prophet,;. As if to say, this is holy business 
which I am about to undertake. "I am a man 
of unclean lips, and I dwell in the midst of a 
people of unclean lips. ' ' These discoveries were 
made, as he confesses, when he had the vision 
of GocVrfwhen his eyes had seen the King, the 
Lord of hosts. Then came the touch of cleans- 
ing ..and the consciousness of power. His ears 
were open to hear the call of God for service, 
and his soul cried out for the commission to go. 

There is a striking similiarity in the ease 
of Saul of Tarsus. When on the way to Da- 
macus he saw the vision he became at once obe- 
dient to the call to service, and his soul cried out 
immediacy, ' ' Lord what wilt thou have me to 
do?" We are in the Lord's hands, ready to 
go at bidding only when we have had the 
vision — a personal revelation — a sense of his 
pardoning and sanctifying power. 

Let those who have gone forth in the holy 
work of 'the Christian ministry — prophets of 
the latest 1 and best dispensation — stop a moment 
and inquire. Let this inquiry lead to a discov- 
ery of our relation to those about us and of our 
duty. If we have the true prophetic spirit, 
which is the basis of an effective evangelism our 
ministry will not be barren of results. 



DEATH OF REV. DR. J. T. BAGWELL 

By an oversight we failed last week to an- 
nounce the death of Rev. J. T. Bagwell, D. D., 
which occurred at his home in Ardmore, Okla- 
homa, on the 27th of December. Many Advo- 
cate readers will recall Doctor Bagwell as, for 
a number of years, one of the most prominent 
members of the old North Carolina Confer- 
ence. One of the brightest stars of the South- 
ern Methodist pulpit, in the midst of a popular 
career he met a sad eclipse. Subsequent to this 
he renewed his covenant and was readmitted 
and did several years of faithful service, trans- 
ferring to the Arkansas Conference, where he 
was stationed at Fort Smith, afterwards serv- 
ing as presiding elder of the Morrilton District. 

Several years ago he went to Oklahoma and 
took a local relation in which relation he was 
at the time' of his death. For some years his 
health had been very poor and his death was not 
unexpected. 

Doctor Bagwell was born and reared in Alex- 
ander county, in a community which is remark- 
able for the number of talented and useful min- 
isters which it has proau^d. His educational 
opportunities were limited, i>ut he made gooa 
use of them and with apparent ease, came to the 



front as a preacher. His many former f rien 
in this state will be glad to know that with h: 
there was light in the evening time, and tl 
his end was peaceful. Far removed from t 
bitterness and sorrow Which come to men 1 
cause of human frailty we shall hope to m< 
and greet him in that bright land where th€ 
will' be no movfi curse. 

Rev. M. L. .Butler, of Ardmore, writing t 
account of his death to the Western Methodi 
of Little Rock, says: "Rev. J. T. Bagwell, 
D., who for a . number of years was promine 
in the North Carolina Conference, and later d 
several years faithful work in the Arkans 
Conference, but for the past seven or eig 
years has been in the local ranks, died at. t 
family residence in this city on the 27th of I 
cember, age4 65 years. He leaves a widow a: 
six children.' Funeral services were conduct 
by the writer, assisted by Rev. J. D. Salt' 
Presiding Elder of Ardmore District. I 
Bagwell was a great preacher. His intellect! 
faculty was seldom equaled. He was our pi 
sonal friend, and we are sad because of 1 
departure. He had been in declining heal 
for years 1 , hence his death is no surprise. ' ' 

MIRACLES OF MODERN SURGERY 

The writer was brought up in a home he 
ing the good fortune to enjoy the ministr: 
of a Christian physician. Some of the most v 
uable lessons in hygiene that we ever learn 
came incidentally through him as he convers 
from time to time in the family on the > 
rious topics suggested by the cases under tre; 
ment. 

As we now recall the visits and conversatio 
i of this really great and good man, his si; 
gestions were not confined to physical hygie 
alone, but to moral therapeutics as well- ] 
believed thoroughly in a clean life as well 
a clean body as the essential foundation 
strong manhood, and with ■him religion was t 
only foundation upon which to build such ma 
hood. What a blessing is the work of such 
physician in any community ! A man : w 
comes to heal both soul and body ! The wou, 
has yet to come to a just appreciation of t 
value of the Christian physician. 

But we began to write more especially of t 
wonders of modern surgery and to call the < 
tention of our readers to the miracles that a 
being performed daily in our midst. As in o 
boyhood days we enjoyed the blessings of t 
consecrated skill of that godly physician wit 
' out much thought of what we really owed 
him, so today we enjoy the almost miracle-woi 
ing skill of physicians and surgeons with lit' 
thought of what it all means to us. 

Some days ago the editor had occasion 
accompany a friend to the offices of Dr. J. > 
Long, of this city, for examination under t 
X-Ray. We confess the process by which, 
the course of an hour, the patient was look 
through and through, was calculated to ma 
one stand in awe, as if for the moment co 
scious of being in the presence of the sup( 
natural. The invisible was made visible, ai 
we looked at the internal organs, including t 
iieart which, like a dynamo, was driving t 
machinery of life. As never before, we appre> 
ateii the expression of the Psalmist, ' ' I am fee 
fully and wonderfully made." 

Incidentally, Dr. Long and his assistant, E 
Ogburn, son of our Rev. T. J. Ogburn, to> 
occasion to exhibit some plates which have i 
cently been made showing seriously fraetur 
and broken bones, and the various stages 
progress in their surgical treatment. Two cas 
where the subject had suffered gunshot woun 
piercing the head apparently through the ce 
ter. These pictures demonstrated clearly to t 
eye how, under the skillful treatmqmt of t 
surgeon with the assistance of the X-Ray, e 
ture comes to the rescue, even to the extent 
forming a new bone by the absorption of t 
old. 

This great machine was only recently insta 
ed taking the place of the less elaborate on 
\vhich have, been heretofore in use, and it is ii 
possible to 1 estimate the value of it in the gre 
surgical work now being done by Dr. Long. 

What we have said with regard to th 
equipment and the wonders of modern surgei 
itself may be said of this man in his work 



January 28, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Three 



a surgeon. Modest, unassuming, faithful and 
diligent, he does a work marvelous in extent 
and efficiency and only the centuries to fol- 
low will reveal the value of such, especially 
when it is considered that the skill of the hand 
and the ingenuity of brain have been directed 
by a child-like faith in God. 

Drs. Long and Ogburn did not know this 
was to be written. Even now they will say it 
ought not; but the editor believes that all our 
physicians are over-modest about publicity. Our 
people should know that the skill and equip- 
ment of modern surgery, directed by Christian 
men, may be had at home as well as abroad. It 
is still true that men and women "suffer 
many things of many physicians, ' ' this account- 
ing in no small degree for their serious ail- 
ments ; but perhaps the most deplorable fact is 
that many of them go long distances ana spend 
much of their means in the effort to avail them- 
selves of service inferior to what may be had at 
their doors. 

A little later we may take occasion to write 
what might be very properly termed the sequel 
to this, namely, a plea for the establishment 
somewhere in this central section of a hospital, 
under Protestant, if not Methodist, auspices, to 
furnish our people an opportunity to avail 
themselves fully of the benefits of such skill- 
ful surgery at home. 



DR. H. M. HAMILL DEAD 

The whole church, especially the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, is bereaved because 
of the death of Rev. H. M. Hamill, D. D., which 
occurred at Tate Springs, Tenn., on Thurs- 
day night of last week. ' 

Dr. Hamill has for many years been con- 
nected with our Sunday School Department 
and his name is a household word throughout 
the' Southern Methodist Church. At the time 
of his death he was at the head of the Teach- 
er Training Department of our Sunday School 
Board, also president of the International Sun- 
day School Association. He was also chaplain 
general of the United Confederate Veterans. 
He was a native of Lowndesboro, Alabama, 
and was about sixty-five years of age. He had 
special adaptation to the work in which he 
was engaged and it will be hard to find a man 
who can fill the place with equal efficiency. 



THE EFFICIENCY CONFERENCE 

In accordance with the action of our last Gen- 
eral Conference an Efficiency Conference has 
been arranged for which will be held at Thom- 
asville, April 13th. This Conference has been 
called by Bishop Waterhouse and we are in- 
formed will be composed only of the Bishop 
and presiding elders. 



ORDER YOUR BOOKS THROUGH US 

We call attention to the following books 
which have been recommended specially for the 



preacher's reading just now: 

John Wesley's Journal in 4 vols $1.50 

Revival Lectures, Chas. G. Finney 50 

Pastoral and Personal Evangelism, 

Goodell 1.00 

Taking Men Alive, Trumbell, Paper 35 

Evangelism Exemplified, Luther E. Todd 1.00 
Primitive Traits in Religious Revivals, 

Prof. Davenport 1.50 

Psychology of Religion, Prof. Starbuck. . 1.00 
The Spiritual Life, Prof. Geo. R. Coe .. 1.00 

Building the Kingdom, Chappell 1.00 

The Building of the Church, Jefferson . . .50 
? Great Revivals and the Great Republic, 

Candler 1.00 



The foregoing books have been recommended 
for the Campaign of Evangelism now on and 
can be had at the prices named plus the postage, 
which for convenience we will guarantee not to 
exceed five cents for each volume when cash 
accompanies the order. 

Any book from the Catalogue of Smith and 
Lamar or any accredited publishers at the pub- 
lisher's price. 

Address orders to 

Board of Publication, 
. . ,„ Greensboro, N. C. 



NOTE AND COMMENT 

The War Situation has not changed much 
since our last issue either in Mexico or in Eu- 
rope. A naval engagement occurred in the 
waters of the North Sea on Sunday between 
British and German squadrons in which the 
Germans lost one of their battle cruisers and 
several hundred men. 

* * * # 

Alabama Swings Back into the prohibition 
column. Last week the legislature passed the 
act that is to close up the saloons on July 1st. 
Governor Henderson vetoed the measure and 
asked the legislature to submit the question 
to the voters at a special election; but both 
houses voted down his proposition and repassed 
the bill by overwhelming majorities, thus over- 
riding the veto. It would seem now that Mr. 
Underwood ought to be trembling in his shoes 
and be getting ready for what is to happen to 
him if he does not change his mind on the sub- 
ject of nation-wide prohibition. Alabama is 
overwhelmingly for prohibition, but has here- 
tofore been hoodwinked by politicians. 

* * * * 

A Sane Movement is that of the Niagara 
Peace Conference, which authorizes the publi- 
cation of the form of petition printed on 
page 10 and which it is hoped will be used by 
every religious organization in the country. We 
might even go farther and say that this peti- 
tion should be used by every civic and business 
organization of the country. The wholesale 
destruction of life and property now going on 
in one of the richest and fairest sections of 
the world — the demon of war now engaged in 
tearing the very heart out of civilization— 
should arouse, not only the social arid religious 
organizations of the country, but the civic and 
commercial as well. Let such organizations 
write to the Niagara Executive Committee, 
Niagara, N. Y., and secure a petition form 
like this one, appoint a committee with in- 
struction to sign in behalf of such organization 
and return to the Niagara Executive Commit- 
tee. This should be done at once. 

^ 

When Will the War End? was the inquiry 
of someone in the presence of Lord Kitchener. 
In reply to this question the great general is 
reported as saying: "I do not kriow when it 
will end, but it will begin in May. ' * Comment- 
ing on this the Northwestern Christian Ad- 
vocate says : 

This answer is significant and suggestive. 
Most of us have been thinking the war has 
been on in real earnest since last August. 
What does the answer signify? Does it moan 
that the Allies are just holding the Teutons 
and by attacks and counter-attacks nibbling 
their forces and ammunition down and so wait- 
ing for an opportune moment for a united 
drive? Does it mean that it will take until 
spring for the Allies to get fully equipped in 
men and guns and ammunition ; for it is known 
that at the beginning of the war they were 
inferior to the Teutons in all the requisites 
for the conflict, while the Germans were the 
most perfectly equipped for war of any nation 
in history ? It is now announced that the Allies 
are making guns the equal, if not the superior, 
of the German guns. Does it mean that they 
are waiting for the opening of the Dardanelles 
and the re-arming and re-ammunitioning of 
Russia by way of the open Dardanelles ? Does it 
mean that in the spring the French will sena 
their reservists to the front and Great Britain 
her new army of one million and a quarter, 
and that this being done and Russia re-equipp- 
ed, the anti-Teutonic forces will be ready for 
concerted action and a vigorous advance move- 
ment? The question and Lord Kitchener's 
answer are given here because of the questions 
raised. The answer is exceedingly suggestive of 
a policy not yet fully realized by the reading, 
anxious public who are wishing for the end 
of the slaughter. 

* * # * 

Intercession Sunday was the day recently ob- 
served in England at the request of King 
George, as a day of special prayer for the suc- 
cess of British Arms. We are not surprised 



that even in England some of the clergy balked. 
Dr. William Carnegie, Canon of Westminster, 
is reported to have declined to comply with 
this request. He said : 

"Among the things which I hold should not 
be prayed for — I mention it with great hesi- 
tation, but feel it to be my duty, since it is 
set forth in the seventh section of the author- 
ized form — is the triumph of our cause. We 
hold that our cause is righteous, but our foes 
are equally convinced that righteousness is on 
their side. God is the judge, and we must 
pray for submission to His will, whatever be the 
issue." 

This utterance of the Canon ought to be an 
effectual rebuke to war lords who have the te- 
merity to ask God's servants to lead the people 
in praying His blessing upon a cause, the 
righteousness of which they themselves cannot 
be certain about. It has been observed that 
the the rulers who have expressed faith in 
God at all have not been willing apparently to 
leave the result to the decision of Him alone 
who knows what ought to be done. If they 
had been of this temperament there weould 
have been no war. 

* # * # 

One Hundred 'Years of Peace. Endeavoring 
to bring to bear the united influence of the 
Church in America in behalf of universal 
peace, the Federal Council of the Churches of 
Christ in America, is endeavoring to lead the 
churches in this country to observe Sunday, 
February 14th, in celebration of one hundred 
years of peace between the English-speaking 
nations. The Secretary of the Church Commit- 
tee on Peace sends out the following mes- 
sage which we take great pleasure in printing 
with editorial endorsement: 

Sunday, February 14, 1915, is the day se- 
lected for the celebration of a hundred years of 
unbroken peace between the two great English- 
speaking nations. In the Sunday schools a pre- 
pared peace program will be generally used, in 
young people 's meetings also there will be suit- 
able exercises, and it is hoped that every pas- 
tor will devote a sermon to the subject. The 
Committee earnestly urges what General Syn- 
ods, General Assemblies, General Conventions 
and other denominational bodies have su ueart- 
ily recommended, a wide observance of the day 
that the lessons of peace may be more thor- 
oughly learned by young and old alike. - 

Why observe this centenary while Europe is 
ablaze with war and nations long our close 
friends are in deadly combat? 

Because peace has its lessons more potent 
than war, and never were they more pertinent 
than now. Europe, insisting that peace could 
only be insured by great armies and arma- 
ments, is suddenly, in its preparedness, 
plunged into the greatest war of history and 
has broken boundaries and broken peace to 
show for its faith in the sword The United 
States, trusting in international law and good- 
will, preserves inviolate its defenceless fron- 
tier of nearly 4,000 miles for a hundred years. 
There are no better neighbors than the Cana- 
dians and ourselves. 

Is not this the moment to point to war as an 
unmitigated curse and an unnecessary and bar- 
barous expedient ? It is mangling and destroy- 
ing the flower of Europe's manhood, breaking 
up homes, razing cities, ravaging fruitful lands 
and sinking thousands of millions of wealth. 
The Toronto Globe says "the sword now un- 
sheathed should never be sheathed again — it 
should be broken." War never had fewer real 
friends and was never held at a lower estimate. 
Every one of the nations involved in it seeks to 
excuse itself and lay the blame on others. 

Our hundred years of peace was many times 
threatened. Time and again, our international 
relations were strained and passions Kindled; 
but national restraint and diplomatic patience 
and friendliness and also doubtless lacs of prep- 
aration averted conflict. As a result the bonds 
of peace were never so strong between England 
and the United States as today. May we not, to 
adapt the words of a great Church leader, have 
a league of peace, offensive and defensive, with 
every nation of earth ? 



/ 



Page Four 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 28, l3l5 



| CONTRIBUTIONS f 

WHITEFIELD'S ELOQUENCE 
Facts from Life 

W. H. Townsend 
'Dr. Lathrop, of West Spring-field, Mass., re- 



thinking to turn him into ridicule, had perched 
himself on one of the overhanging boughs right 
above the preacher's head, and with monkey- 
like dexterity, mimicking his gesticulations, en- 
deavored to raise a laugh among the audience 



WHO THEN IS THE GREATEST? 

By Ernest A. Miller 
The child is the greatest. According to a ma- 
terial measure this may not be a true statement, 



Whitefield caught a glance at him, but with 
out seeming to have noticed him, continued his 
discourse. With the skill of a practiced ora- 
tor, he reserved the incident for the proper 
place. He was expatiating at the moment on 



lated to Mr. Whitefield a fact which the doctor the power and sovereignty of Divine 



had personally witnessed. The same day Mr. 
Whitefield introduced the story in his sermon, 
and Dr. Lathrop as he heard it found himself 
drowned in tears. ' ' 
Rev. Jno. Newton's Opinion of Whitefield 



grace. 



With gathering force and earnestness he told of 
the unlikely objects it had often chosen, and 
the unlooked for triumphs it had achieved. As 
he rose to the climax of his inspiring theme, and 
when in the full sweep of his eloquence, he 



Rev. John Newton was asked if he knew Mr 
Whitefield. He answered in the affirmative, and 
observed that as a preacher Mr. Whitefield far 
exceeded any other man of his time. Mr. New- 
ton added, 'I bless God that I lived in his 
time ; many were the winter mornings I got up 
at four to attend his Tabernacle discourses at 
five, and I have seen Moorfields as full of lan- 
terns at these times as, I suppose, the Maymark- 
et is full of flambeaux on an- opera night.' As 
a proof of the power of Mr. Whitefield 's preach- 
ing, Mr. Newton mentioned that an officer at 
Glassgow, who had heard him preach, laid a 
wager with another, that at a certain charity 
sermon, though he went with prejudice, he 
would be compelled to give something ; the other 



to make sure he would not, laid all the money another stroke of his oratory made me ashamed 



out of his pocket ; but before he left the church 
he was glad to borrow some and lose his bet. 
Mr. Newton mentioned another striking exam- 
ple of Mr. Whitefield 's persuasive oratory, col- 
lecting at one sermon £600 ($3,000.00) for the 
inhabitants of an obscure village in Germany 
that had been burned down. After the sermon 
Mr. Whitefield said, "We shall sing a hymn, 
during which those who do not choose to give 
their mite on this awful occasion may sneak 
off.' Not one moved; he got down from the 



pulpit, ordered all the doors shut but one, at lend him some money for the purpose. The re- 



which he held the plate himself and collected 
the above large sum. Mr. Newton related that 
at the time of Mr. Whitefield 's greatest persecu- 
tion, when obliged to preach in the streets, m 
one week he received not fewer than a thousand 
letters from persons distressed in their 
consciences by the energy of his preaching. ' ' 

David Hume, the historian and infidel, tes- 
tifies : ' ' He is the most ingenious preacher I 
ever heard. It is worth while to go twenty miles 
to hear him. ' ' He then repeated the following 



Guided by the looks of some of his hearers, But life, or personality, as it is sometime s called. 

can never be adequately represented by the 
bookkeeper's balance sheet, the tailor's suit, the 
clerk's register or the grocer's scales. There is 
no greater delusion in life's appraisements 
than the delusion of bulk. The little child yields 
to it in wishing to be a man ; the adult falls a 
victim to its deceit in ignoring the little child. 
The truth is that, in items of true value, life 
is a diminishing quantity. Years and merit 
form an inverse ratio rather than a direct one. 

"A man's life consisteth not in the abund- 
ance of the things which he possesseth." "The 
life is more than meat and the body than rai- 
ment." "Judge not according to the appear- 
ance, but judge righteous judgment." Big- 
ness is not greatness; strength is not power; 
avoirdupois is not weight; noise is not music; 
money is not wealth. He that is pure is great ; 
he that can move another life to a "purer air 
and a broader view" is truly strong. By all 
standards of this character the children have 
the primacy. 

The children are pure. Christ said so. "Of 
such is the kingdom." "Blessed are the pure in 
heart: for they shall see God." 

Children are pure because they have so re- 
cently come from God. 

Trailing clouds of glory do we come 

From God, who is our home : 
Heaven lies about us in our infancy. 
The greatness that is efficient is the greatness 
of purity. Whether it be purity of ignorance 
or purity by choice it is true greatness, and 
truly commanding. How small the befouled 
man feels, and how small he really is! Self- 
respect is an essential to large-souledness, and 
there can be no honest self-respect when there 
is a stain on the character. Many a man remem. 
bers reverently and longingly the white days of 
childhood. He recalls with poignant grief the 
first conscious wrongdoing. His soul was with- 
ered beneath the blight of sin. There was a per- 
ceptible shrinking of life at that time, which 
was very hard to bear. Through the growing 
meanness and sophistry of the years nearly all 
of self-respect has slipped away, and the soul 
is but a shadow of its former child self. 



"In a company of noblemen and gentlemen, suddenly paused, and turning round and point 

ing slowly to the wretch above him, exclaimed 
in a tone of deep and thrilling pathos, 'Even 
he may yet be a subject of that free and resist- 
less grace. ' It was a shaft from the Almighty. 
Winged by the Divine Spirit it struck the scof- 
fer to the heart, and realized, in his conver- 
sion, the glorious truth it contained. ' ' 

Benjamin Franklin's Tribute to Whitefield 
"I happened," said the doctor, "to attend 
one of his sermons, in the course of which I 
perceived he intended to finish with a collec- 
tion, and I silently resolved he should get notn- 
ing from me. I had in my pocket a handful of 
copper money, three or four silver dollars, and 
five pistoles of gold. As he proceeded I began 
to soften, and concluded to give the copper, 



of that, and determined me to give the silver, 
and he finished so admirably, that I emptied my 
pocket wholly into the collection dish — gold and 
all. At this sermon there was also one of our 
club, who being of my sentiments respecting 
the building in Georgia, and suspecting a col- 
lection might be intended, had by precaution 
emptied his pockets before he came from home. 
Towards the conclusion of the discourse, how- 
ever, he felt a strong inclination to give, and 
applied to a neighbor who stood near him, to 



quest was made to perhaps the only man in the 
company who had the coldness not to be affected 
by the preacher. His answer was, ' At any other 
time, friend Hodgkinson, I would lend to thee 
freely; but thee seems to be out of thy right 
senses!' " 

One day Dr. Franklin returned to Philadel- 
phia and found Whitefield preaching in the 
open air. He stood on the outskirts of the 
crowd where he could hear every word. From 
this point he made a calculation that "White- 



passage which occurred towards the close of the field could preach to ten thousand people in the 



discourse he had heard. After a solemn pause 
Mr. Whitefield thus addressed his numerous au- 
dience : ' The attendant angel is just about leav- 
ing the threshold and ascending to heaven. And 
shall he ascend and not bear with him the news 
of one sinner among all this multitude re- 
claimed from the error of his ways?' To give 
the greater effect to this exclamation he stamped 
with his foot, lifted up his eyes and hands to 
heaven, and with gushing tears, cried aloud : 
Stop, Gabriel; stop, Gabriel! stop ere you en- 
ter the sacred portals, and yet carry with you 
the news of one sinner converted to God ! ' 
He then in the most simple but energetic lang- 
uage, described what he called a Saviour's dy- 
ing love to sinful man, so that almost the whole 
assembly melted into tears. This address was 
accompanied with such animated yet natural ac- 
tion that it surpassed anything I ever saw or 
heard in any other preacher." 

"John Skinner of Houndscroft, England, was 
a strolling fiddler, going from fair to fair, 
supplying music to any party that wouJd hear 
him. Having determined to interrupt that 
great and successful minister of Christ, Mr. 
Whitefield, he obtained a standing on a ladder 
raised to a window near the pulpit ; he remain- 
ed quiet till the text was named, when he in- 
tended to begin his annoying exercises on the 
violin. It pleased God, however, while he was 
putting his instrument in tune, to convey the 
word spoken with irresistible power to his soul ; 
he heard the whole sermon and became altogeth- 
er a new man." 

" Whitefiehl was addressing an immense au- 
dience under the shade of a venerable tree in the 



meadows of Edinburgh, when a poor creature, tian church. 



open air and every word could be distinctly 
heard. ' ' 

The Broken Heart 

"When Whiteleld was preaching at Exeter 
there was a man present who had loaded his 
pockets with stones in order to fling them at 
this ambassador of Christ. He heard the 
prayer, however, with patience, but no sooner 
had he named his text, than the man pulled a 
stone out of his pocket and held it in his hand 
waiting for a fair opportunity to throw. But 
God sent a sword to his heart, and the stone 
dropped from his hand. After the sermon, he 
went to Whitefield and told him, 'Sir, I came 
to hear you this day with a view to break your 
head, but the Spirit of the Lord, through your 
ministry, has given me a broken heart.' The 
man proved to be a sound convert, and lived to 
be an ornament to the church." 

Rev. John Wesley's Tribute to Whitefield 
' ' Have we read or heard of any person since 
the apostles who testified to the gospel of the 
grace of God through so large a part of the hab- 
itable world? Have we read or heard of any 
person who called so many myrads of, 
sinners to repentance ? Above all have we read 
or heard of any that was the blessed instrument 
in His hands of bringing so many sinners from 
darkness to light, from the power of satan unto 
God.?" 

Mr. Wesley said to a minister, ' 1 Go hear 
Whitefield and learn how to preach." 

From the many testimonies of Whitefield 's 
oratory from scholars, skeptics, critics, saints 
and sinners, it is probable that he was the great- 
est pulpit orator in the history of the Chris- 



bolder and more imposing front is assumed, 
but the man knows the fallacy of his own life; 
and, what is more, he knows that God knows, 
and in his soul is sad. 

Phillips Brooks once said: "It is an awful 
hour when the first necessity of hiding any- 
thing comes. The whole life is different thence- 
forth. When there are questions to be feared 
and eyes to be avoided and subjects which 
must not be touched, then the bloom of life is 
gone. Put off that day as long as possible. Put 
it off forever if you can." 

Children have great power. Their very in- 
nocence and purity give their efforts full sway. 
You do not discount a child's word or deed; 
you do take with many a grain of salt what 
your conventionalized man or woman says or 
does. But children know no tricks of tongue or 
hand ; they do not act — they live. They are all 
Sir Galahads. 
My good blade carves the casques of men, 

My tough lance thrusteth sure, 
My strength is as the strength of ten 

Because my heart is pure. 
I have seen a child, by the very power of 
his soul, do what strong men have resolutely 
attempted, but without success. A man has 
been downed by the drink habit. Brothers and 
friends have tried to help him up. They have 
expostulated and pleaded, but all in vain. A 
good woman, willing to take the risk, and be- 
lieving in the power of love, has said at the altar 
of sacrifice, "I will have this man to be my 
wedded husband," but she could not hold him 
on his feet. Then on a later day God sent that 
man a child, flesh of his flesh. That little life 
became that man's other, better self. The pur- 
ity of that little soul mocked him, challenged 
him, sobered him, drove him to God for over- 
coming grace, and he stood upon his feet and 
walked, and was a man again. And, if ever he 
felt inclined to evil, a look out of those little 
eyes, or a chubby handclasp, or even a remem- 



January 28, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Five 



brance of his offspring, shot strength to his soul. 
What the earnestness of men, and the sweet love 
of a woman could not do, a little child did 
easily in the unmatched might of his radiant 
helplessness. God worked so naturally through 
that little life. It was "as effortless as wood- 
land nooks send violets up and paint them 
blue." 

Children are the true kings of the universe. 
They rule our hearts and our homes. We are 
very boastful of our determination, but children 
work us. They are the spellbinders of the hu- 
man heart. In their hands we are as clay in 
the hands of the potter. 

Because of little children we rise to the stat- 
ure of heroes sometimes. Men have shouldered 
muskets and looked into the mouths of death- 
dealing cannon that their children might have a 
free country for an inheritance. We become as 
gods for the love of a child. We bid Satan to 
get behind us when we think of our own sweet, 
helpless children whose lives we must not blight. 
God will never die out of men and women so 
long as He permits them to give their lives away 
to these other little lives that are His and theirs. 

I say again that, if true greatness attach- 
es to purity and power, children are pre-emi- 
nently great. You may say that such greatness 
is not theirs because not self -chosen. I reply 
that children's greatness is all the more divine 
because unconscious. It is our conscious mor- 
ality that devitalizes our apparent goodness. If 
our virtues are as natural and as spontaneous 
as those of Christ's chosen ones, the little chil- 
dren, then we may stand unashamed in God's 
clear light. We shall have preserved our "birth- 
right. 

As parents and teachers and social beings, we 
have another duty than that of not allowing the 
child to die out of our own hearts ; upon us rests 
the responsibility of the perpetuation of the 
purity and the power of these little lives into 
their maturity. We have to mold their charac- 
ters. We must add to their faith virtue. ' ' Whoso 
shall offend one of these little ones which believe 
in me, it were better for him that a millstone 
were hanged about his neck, and that he were 
drowned in the depth of the sea." — New York 
Christian Advocate. 



BLESSED— MOURNE— COMFORTED 

Forde Otts 
On Friday afternoon I stood above the re- 
mains of his child and performed the last sad 
rites prior to the burial of the body in the 
earth. 0, how my heart went out to the motner, 
who, broken in grief, bowed tenderly over the 
beautiful face and sobbed: "My little baby! 
My little baby ! How much mamma loved her 
little baby! Good-by, little darling, mamma 
will meet you in hea\ en some day. ' ' God bless 
every mother who has had to say "good-by" to 
her child. 

Saturday brought me a busy day in my study 
I knew nothing of the happenings on the out- 
side. After my pulpit ministrations had been 
performed on Sunday morning I walked down 
the street a little way to catch a breath of 
God 's pure air. I heard an oath — an oath from 
him whose child had so recently gone to live 
with God. "Ah is it possible," I said to my- 
self, "that any father can so soon forget the 
prattle of little feet, the touch of baby hands, 
and the music of a childish laugh ? ' ' What in 
all this world but rum can drive so quickly 
from a father's heart the tender memories of a 
departed child! I stood for a few moments 
looking upon that fearful scene. There were 
those who shared with the poor drunken father 
in the thought that life was to him now com- 
plete. Others passed him with indifference, 
while others passed and pitied. I too, pitied 
but that was not all, for on the walls of my 
soul the hand of the Holy Spirit had painted 
this scene, and in the dull ears of my heart God 
had spoken. And so in the deepness of the 
night I saw this poor man stagger up to his 
humble home. I saw his wife wear away the 
night as grief and fear combined to baffle sieep. 
I heard his uncertain steps upon the porch. I 
heard her speak lovingly to the man whom sne 
called husband. I heard the blow that sent 
her in a heap to the floor. I heard another sob 
which was an echo from the casket in white. I 
heard him swear again and then I saw her pass 



out hurriedly into the night. And still I heard 
him curse — curse himself, curse his friends, 
curse his soul and God. 

Wakeful till the last watch in the night, I 
cried out of my soul: "O God, I did not get 
drunk — I did not call upon thee to damn my 
soul — 'twas not my staggering steps that sent 
terror into the heart of that little woman; 
I did not drive her into the night; Lord, let 
me sleep and rest!" 

If God ere spoke to any seer He spoke to me : 
0, selfish man, wilt thou not bear the world's 
dread load of pain upon the shoulders of thy 
soul! Dost thou refuse to watch with me out 
yonder in Gethsemane where drops of troubled 
sweat do mingle free with willing blood ! I 
honor thee to let thee bear His cross through 
wakeful hours, for every agony thy soul has 
felt was first a sob in hearts divine, and every 
tear that veils thine eye doth mingle with the 
tears of mine. 

And so I shall not lay my burden down, 

For God will make some day my cross a 
crown. 

ON THE SUNNY SIDE 

Rev. C. F. Sherrill 

"If the dear Lord should send an angel down, 
A seraph radient in his robes of light, 
To do some menial service in our streets, 
As breaking stones, we '11 say, from morn till 
night ; 

Think you the faintest blush would rise 
To marr the whiteness of his holy face? 

Think you a thought of discontent could find 
Within his perfect heart an abiding place ? 

I love to think the sweet will of God 
Would seem as gracious in a seraph 's eye 

In the dark and miry crowded lanes of earth, 
As in the ambrosial bowers of Paradise ; 

That these fair hands that lately swept the 
lyre, 

Would not against their lowly task rebel, 
i But as they ever wrought his will in heaven, 
Would work it here as faithfully and well. ' ' 

Christ never wrought a miracle for His own 
convenience or self-agrendizement. In behalf 
of others and never for Himself the miraculous 
power was exerted. He who fed the multitude 
by the miracle of multiplication refused to turn 
the stones into bread to satisfy His own hunger 
when He had fasted forty days. He who raised 
Lazarus from the grave refused to come down 
from the cross to save Himself. How devoid of 
all selfishness was the Christ ! His first miracle 
was to add innocent joy on the marriage occa- 
sion. His last miracle was to heal the ear of the 
servant who was in the mob to arrest Him. 
"He might have built a palace at a word, 

Who sometimes had not where to lay His 
head; 

He healed another's scratch; His own side 
bled; 

Side, feet and hands with cruel piercings 
gored ! 

0 wonderful the wonders left undone ! 
0 self-restraint, passing human thought, 
To have all power, and be as having none ! ' ' 

# # #i >%\ffi 

Jesus' first miracle was as perfect as His last. 
This is not the way of mere man. It is a long 
road from grandma's spinning wheel to the ten 
million dollar factory; from the pine-knot to 
the electric light that lights up a ciy; from 
the Indian dug-out to the ocean liner. Man 
never made but one thing beyond which he has 
made no progress — the violin. All God's ways 
are perfect. The first miracle of J esus was as 
perfect as His last. 

Love conquers all barriers. It is a spark of 
fire from the heavenly altars. All true love 
is akin to the Divine love. It looks in smiles, 
speaks in kind and gentle words ; but love reach- 
es its crown in service and sacrifice. Hardy 
men of Scotland braved the storm and waded 
through snow and ice to stand by the grave in 
which William McClure was to be buried. No 
storm was ever too rough for this heroic soul to 
face when suffering called him. His life was 
one of service. Self-sacrifice was the passion of 
this great soul. Children cried in the streets 
when William the silent was dead. How he 



loved the children! And how they loved him! 
"Men, I cannot promise you ease, but only 
pain, hardship and death," said Garabaldi to 
his soldiers; but they flocked to his standard. 
They loved their general and they loved Italy. 



A HUNDRED YEARS OF PEACE 

Isn't it worth while to celebrate such a mo- 
mentous fact? Again and again the United 
States and Great Britain have been uncomfort- 
ably close to a rupture of their international re- 
lations. During and after the Civil War the 
bonds of peace were severely strained ; the Fen- 
ian raid on Canada was very provocative, but 
the Canadians and ourselves have not ceased to 
be good neighbors; the attitude of England on 
economical questions of vital concern to us 
aroused feelings in us akin to hatred. A dozen 
times one or the other nation talked war pretty 
seriously, but we passed the danger points safe- 
ly and our international relations were never 
more satisfactory than now. 

We have had differences, but amity, pa- 
tience, good sense have entered into the diplo- 
macy of each nation, and a hundred years have 
cemented our friendship and broadened our 
common understanding. There is no mutual en- 
mity except toward war. 

The glory of the hundred years is that, hav- 
ing had temptation and excuse for war, we 
avoided it. With other European nations, ex- 
cepting only Spain, we have had no occasion for 
serious quarrel. 

If lack of defenses and armed defenders in- 
vites war, what about our Northern boundary 
and our relations with Canada? Never for a 
moment have either the Canadians or ourselves 
regretted the absence of warships on the Lakes, 
or fortifications and armies on the nearly 4,000 
miles of frontier. We might have had war, in- 
stead of continued peace, if the armies and 
armaments, the battleships and marines, had 
been at hand in force. At least that is what has 
happened in Europe, where the frontiers bris- 
tled with formidable fortifications, and big ar- 
mies and navies were ready to take up any quar- 
rel in earnest. 

At all events, we have abundant occasion for 
thankfulness that we have restricted our wars 
during the century to three ; and are we not 
persuaded that the Mexican, Civil and Spanish 
wars, if present conditions of civilization, senti- 
ment and statesmanship had prevailed last cen- 
tury, would have been avoided? 

Wherefore, with amity for all nations and 
malice toward none, let us for ourselves and 
for our young people and children, draw 
comfort and confidence from the lessons of the 
hundred years, and dedicate ourselves anew to 
the cause of peace for our own nation and for 
the world. 

Sunday, February 14, 1915, is the day select- 
ed for the religious celebration. There will be 
no other observance at present if at all. An ex- 
cellent program has been provided for the use 
of Sunday schools by the American Church 
Peace Centenary Committee, of the Federal 
Council of the Churches of Christ in America. 
It has been approved by the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Sunday School Council of Evan- 
gelical Denominations, and is furnished by the 
Sunday School Boards of the various denomina- 
tions. The program has been printed by the 
Methodist Book Concern, New York. Cincin- 
nati, and Chicago, and by the Central Bureau 
of Friends, 150 North Fifteenth Street, Phila- 
delphia, and possibly by others. 

An adaptation of the same program will be 
used in young people 's meetings of Christian 
Endeavor, Epworth League, etc., on the same 
date. , - 

All pastors are urged to prepare sermons for 
the occasion, setting forth the blessings of 
peace, and the evil effects of war, and showing 
how to avoid the most deadly and inhuman, the 
most cruel and costly, the most unreasonable 
method of deciding, international differences. 
Pastors will shortly receive through the mail a 
suggestive letter with a pamphlet of 80 pages 
of selections from Professor Dunning 's new 
book, "The British Empire and the United 
States." 

Necessary inquiries may be addressed to the 
Chairman, 114 Woodward Building, Washing- 
ton, D. C. H. K. Carroll, Chairman. 



Page Six 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 28, 1915 



j INTERESTING NEWS FROM FIELD 



NOTES AND PERSONALS 

— Rev. T. C. Jordan, pastor of Wentworth 
Circuit, was in the city on Friday of last week 
and called at the Advocate office. He is hopeful 
of a very prosperous and successful year on the 
Wentworth charge. 

— We regret to learn of the illness of Rev. 
A. E. Wiley, one of our superannuates, at the 
home of his daughter, Mrs. Hanes, at Henri- 
etta. We sincerely hope he may soon be re- 
stored to health. 

— Rev. T. A. Groce requests us to thank the 
following for contributions on the fund for 
seating Pisgah church: Mt. Pleasant S. S., H. 
L. King, Tr., $1.00; Sandy Mush S. S., J. M. 
Capps, Supt., $1.00; Sandy Mush, Philathea 
class, $1.00. 

— Miss Mary J. Hines, daughter of Mrs. M. 
E. V. Hines, of Mount Airy, was brought to 
St. Leo's Hospital on Thursday, January 14, 
where she submitted to an operation for appen- 
dicitis. The friends will be glad to know that 
Miss Hines is rapidly recovering. 

— Rev. W. A. Lambeth, pastor of Main St. 
church, Reidsville, was a welcome visitor at 
the Advocate office on Friday of last week. He 
was stopping over in the city on his return 
from the Missionary Institute in High Point. 

— The Caroleen correspondent of the Ruth- 
erf ordton Sun, says: Rev. M. B. Clegg, the 
new pastor of the Methodist churches here and 
at Henrietta, seems to be getting right hola oi 
the work and his people, and they in turn are 
liking him very much. 

—The Methodist Corner in the Mount Airy 
Times-Leader says : Brethren Sprinkle and Fol- 
ger have been making a canvass looking to 
the raising of $300 with which to pay for a 
church lot in north Mount Airy. They are 
making good progress. 

— Rev. Dr. J. H. Weaver, who has been on 
a rest and taking special treatment for awhile, 
returned to his work last week and his friends 
will be glad to learn that he is much improved 
and expects now to go right along with his 
work. 

— We regret to learn that the family of Rev. 
J. W. Williams, of Marshville, has been very 
much afflicted recently, Mrs. Williams and her 
two children haying been confined to their 
rooms for some time. We wish for them a 
speedy recovery. 

—Rev. Dr. Charles W. Byrd was before the 
Committee in Raleigh last Thursday, along with 
other representative men in behalf of the bill 
which is now pending to establish a Reforma- 
tory for fallen women. There is strong senti- 
ment behind this movement and we sincerely 
hope the bill will go through. 

— Referring to the work of Rev. B. M. Jack- 
son on the Lowesville circuit, the Lincoln Coun- 
ty News says : ' ' Rev. Mr. Jackson has a ' Ford, ' 
but it will not ford mud that is deeper than 
its wheels are high. Despite the fact that his 
work is badly scattered and bad weather, he 
has scarcely missed an appointment this win- 
ter." 

—Miss Lelia Tuttle, who, for several years, 
has been in mission work in China, visited 
Greensboro last Sunday and made a very inter- 
esting address at West Market Street Church 
on Sunday evening. Miss Tuttle works under 
the direction of the Woman's Council, and is 
supported by Central Church, Concord. 

— The Charlotte Observer on Monday said 
that before his sermon on Sunday morning at 
Trinity church, Dr. T. F. Marr took occasion to 
express gratification over the number of chil- 
dren who are attending the preaching ser- 
vices, and his desire that they continue to 
do so. There is no surer evidence that Dr. 
Marr is sowing seed in good ground. 

— Our congregation at Burkhead, Winston- 
Salem is rejoicing over the happy achieve- 
ment of having paid the debt on the church- 
On a recent Sunday they burned the note in 
the pregence of the congregation. A pretty 



good evidence, that the debt has been fully 
satisfied. Rev. W. L. Hutchins, the pastor, says 
in a note to the editor: "We are all happy 
and ambitious for the future. Our church is 
a veritable bee-hive."- 

— Rev. John D. Pegram, of the North Caro- 
lina Conference, died at his home in Jonesboro, 
on Sunday, January 17th. Brother Pegram 
was a brother of Prof. Pegram, long a mem- 
ber of the faculty of Trinity College. He 
was also a brother-in-law of Rev. Dr. C. W. 
Byrd, of Greensboro, his first wife being a sis- 
ter of Dr. Byrd. He was a good and faithful 
minister of the gospel and was honored by his 
Conference by being elected a delegate to the 
General Conference at Birmingham in 1906. 

— The revival at Mt. Morenci, Sulphur 
Springs circuit, must have been genuine. Rev. 
T. A. Groce, the pastor, reporting, says: "It 
was a great revival for the church. There were 
16 professions and 11 joined the church. Pledg- 
es amounting to $400.00 for missions, seven 
new family altars and a pounding amounting 
to $30.00 for the pastor." The pastor adds, 
"I love my people and am praying for a great 
year for Sulphur Springs circuit." 

—Rev. N. M. Watson, of the Holston Con- 
ference, and' pastor of Church Street, Knox- 
ville, was a visitor in the city on Fri- 
day of last week and made a pleasant call at 
the Advocate office. Brother Watson was called 
to the State on account of the death of Mr. 
Murray, who lost his life in the tragedy on 
Pamlico Sound last week, and who was his 
brother-in-law. Mrs. Murray, who was the only 
survivor of the ill-fated party, is reported to be 
rapidly recovering. 

— Work on the addition to the Main Street 
M. E. church is nearing completion — in fact 
as soon as the pews arrive the church will be 
ready to permit of services. This addition gives 
our Methodist friends a modern edifice, one of 
the largest in this part of the country. Pastor 
Lambeth has extracted a promise from Rev. W. 
F. Womble, a former minister of the church, 
to preach the opening sermon, at which time 
the organist of All Souls (Vanderbilt's) 
church at Biltmore, a warm friend of Mr. Lam- 
beth, will give a recital on the handsome pipe 
organ recently installed in the Reidsville 
church. — Reidsville Review. 

— The church at Spencer, under the leader- 
ship of their pastor, Rev. C. M. Pickens, enjoyed 
a get-together meeting a short while ago of 
which the Crescent says: "This is the first 
meeting of the character held in Spencer and 
we are free to state that same will be of great 
help to the membership of the Methodist church, 
for in these meetings they get closer together 
than in any other way possible. It is a fact that 
the membership of the various churches is not 
in the spirit that it should be for the reason, the 
members have not had the advantage of meeting 
in purely social meetings like the one held last 
evening. 

— The school board of the city of Asheville 
last week elected Mrs. W. A. Newell, wife of 
Rev W. A. Newell, president of Weaver College, 
as supervisor of the work of the kindergartens 
and the primary grades. Mrs. Newell's office 
has just been created by the members of the 
committee and she will assume her new duties 
the first of the coming month. She will have 
general supervision of the younger students of 
the city schools and will organize two teachers' 
classes, one being composed of kindergarten 
teachers while the . others will have instructors 
in the primary grades as its members. Regular 
meetings of the classes will be held by Mrs. 
Newell who will give instructions. Mrs. Newell 
is a graduate of the University of Chicago, and 
was for some years a member of the faculty of 
that institution. She is, by nature and train- 
ing, adapted to this class of educational work, 
and the people of Asheville are to be congratu- 
lated on the opportunity of placing one so com- 
petent in every way at the head of this new de- 
partment. 



— Referring to the very interesting Mission- 
ary Institute held for the Statesville District, 
the Landmark says : The Missionary Institute, 
in session at Broad Street Methodist Church, 
closed Friday night with a strong address by 
Dr. C. W. Byrd, of West Market Sreet Church, 
Greensboro, on "Qualifications for Missionary 
Service." Dr. Byrd filled the place of Bishop 
Atkins, who failed to come. A large number of 
preachers and delegates in attendance left on 
the night trains Friday. The outstanding feat- 
ure of the day programme on Friday was the 
address of Dr. E. K. McLarty on "Evangel- 
ism." The congregation was much moved by 
the earnestness of the speaker and the compell- 
ing force of the message. Almost the entire 
congregation came forward to the altar at the 
close of "the service in response to an appeal to 
join with the preacher in a prayer of consecra- 
tion. It seemed to be a return to the old-time 
Methodist fervor in the old-fashioned camp- 
meeting style of coming forward for prayer. 



Iredell Circuit — While it has been our pleas- 
ure to be assigned work with the loyal people 
of this charge once more, we feel that a word of 
information to the members of the charge and 
to the loyal readers of the church paper, should 
be given in regard to the blank report in the 
Conference Minutes, which was quite a surprise 
to me. In referring to the Minutes of the 
Twenty-fourth Session you will find all claims 
recorded in full with a small surplus in report 
of the Conference claims. This year we gave 
a similar report with minor exceptions. Should 
any one desire further information we have re- 
ceipts and their equivalents showing all assess- 
ments for Conference claims in full with a sur- 
plus of some twenty dollars. We note a small 
per cent, deficit in pastor's salary. We sin- 
cerely trust this report of the work will in a 
manner abridge the error. 

With great expectation we have resumed the 
work, feeling assured that our most successful 
year's work here has begun. We request your 
prayers for victory and the salvation of many 
during the year. Yours fraternally, 

P. H. Brittain. 



Farmington Circuit — January the 1st was a 
good day at the parsonage. On this good day 
the people loaded our dining room table with 
good things to eat. One lady remembered the 
pastor's horse by sending him two bushels of 
oats. The second Sunday the pastor found a 
box filled with good things for the table waiting 
for him at Smith Grove. The pastor also found 
a box for him when he went to the Christinas 
exercises at Bethlehem. This pounding of the 
preacher has continued intermittently up to the 
present. It is also told on these good people 
that they never finally stop pounding their pas- 
tor. 

Our first quarterly conference has passed into 
history. The people very highly enjoyed tne 
preaching of our presiding elder, Dr. H. K. 
Boyer. Our financial report was encouraging. 
Farmington church made the best report, hav- 
ing paid a little more than one-fourth of their 
assessment. Naming the churches in the order 
according to reports, giving the best first, we 
have Farmington, Smith Grove, Wesley's 
Chapel, Ward's Chapel, Bethlehem and Hunts- 
ville. D. C. Ballard, P. C . 



Belwood Charge — We always hail with de- 
light the mail which brings the Advocate. Life 
to us would be dull without it. Among other 
things, we enjoy very much the items from the 
field sent in by the brethren. Very often we 
think of dispatching a line from the Belwood 
charge, but not being specially adapted to 
that kind of thing, excuse ourselves and so pass 
on. But "It's a long lane that never turns," 
so we stop to speak a word. 

The Belwood charge is made up of churches 
in upper Cleveland, situated in a splendid 
farming section. The people as a rule are 
progressive and carry on their farm work in 
a scientific way. Some of our strong men 
have labored among the people of this charge. 
We mention here the lamented Dr. Hudson and 
our present and beloved R. M. Hoyle and 
Brother Comann, our general evangelist. They 



January 28, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Seven 



have left their "foot prints" behind them. I 
find many who rise up and call them blessed. 
Other good and faithful men have wrought 
well here. 

Under the supervision of the Conference, 
Belwood once had a flourishing school. Some 
of our very efficient young preachers, such, for 
instance, as Loy D. Thompson, of Marion; O. 
J. Jones, of Wilkesboro, and J. M. Rowland, 
of the Virginia Conference, laid deep and 
broad the foundation for future study and 
learning here. We have now within the bounds 
of the charge a splendid State High School at 
Fallston, and the Piedmont School, which has in 
the neighborhood of two hundred boarding 
students. Many of our young people take ad- 
vantage of the splendid opportunities which 
these schools offer. 

Belwood has done well in contributing to the 
growth of our Central church in Shelby, giv- 
ing to it such men as the late Capt. Hoyle, 
Barnie B. Baber, Horace Thompson, 0. E. 
Ford and W. D. Lackey. These men, together 
with their estimable families, make strength 
anywhere. But we have just as good as we 
have given. We have a great many people on 
the Belwood circuit, who are really loyal to 
the church and who love God in sincerity and 
truth. They are the kind which sanctify the 
earth by living on it. They want to see things 
move up and out, get up and go. I feel sorry 
for any Methodist preacher who does not ad- 
mire that kind of spirit anywhere. 

We are now in our second year on this 
charge. We are praying that it may be the 
best of the two. The fruits which attended our 
labors last year encourage us to look for greater 
things this year. During 1914 the pastor spent 
one hundred and nineteen nights away from 
the parsonage and was engaged for seven long 
weeks in revival work, witnessed something like 
one hundred and fifty conversions and recla- 
mations, and received thirty-nine on prof es- 
sion of faith. Yet so much had to be left un- 
done. . 

In spite of the. very depressed conditions 
financially, the salaries were raised above that 
of the preceding year and paid in full. Every 
dollar w^as paid on the collections ordered by 
the Conference. We were asked for 12 new 
subscribers to the Advocate' and secured 13. 
But weather conditions have been such for the 
last two months that we have not had our usual 
congregations. In this lies one great defficulty 
in getting ourselves properly organized for the 
New Year. We find work rapidly accumulat- 
ing. During the time which we have been 
shut in by weather we have kept ourselves busy 
reading and studying "Asbury's Journals," 
"Taking Men Alive," by Charles Trumbull; 
"The Great Revivals and the Great Repub- 
lic," by our Bishop Candler, and other works 
of this nature. With the increased inspiration 
which these things have brought we are ready 
to confess that the work and toil of pulling 
through the mud and crossing the swollen 
streams have been greatly lessened. Thank 
God for such heroes of the past! But this is 
all too long. Pardon me for one more word. 
Many tokens of appreciation have Come to us 
all along. Our Lawndale church made us joy- 
ful by dispatching a box of good things dur- 
ing the holidays. Then later came two wagons 
from our noble people at Palmtree and they 
carried many things that are really substantial. 
May they be repaid tenfold. J. F. Moser. 



Morganton District Institute 

The Institute for the Morganton District met 
in the Forest City church Wednesday and 
Thursday, Jan. 13-14, 1915. Rev. J. E. Gay, the 
presiding elder, presided over all the services. 
A. C. Swafford was elected secretary. The pro- 
gram as published in Advocate of January 7th, 
with slight variations, was followed. Wednes- 
day was devoted to the discussion of the social 
service work, missionary interests and lay ac- 
tivities. 

Rev. E. E. Williamson spoke on the subject, 
How to conserve the social Service committee, 
emphasizing individual responsibility and urg- 
ing this committee to' be made up of men and 
women who would work tactfully 1 and earnestly 
to lead the unsaved to the -church and to Christ. 



Financial Plans for the District* was dis- 
cussed by Rev. J. E. Gay, E. E. Williamson, J. 
A. Frye, Albert Sherrill and the District Lay 
Leader, F. J. Chapman. The plan in outline is : 
— Every-member Canvass ; Every -member As- 
sessment; Early Missionary Collections; Enve- 
lope System; Every-preaching-day payment on 
pastor's salary; Support a missionary in Brazil 
through Sunday School Special Some Reasons 
Why We Failed ; How We May Succeed ; Diffi- 
culties and How to Overcome Them, were dis- 
cussed by Revs. H. L. Powell, A. C. Swafford 
and Albert Sherrill. 

Rev. J. L. Smith addressed the Institute on 
Home Missions. Rev. H. L. Powell gave a 
very interesting talk on Foreign Missions, giv- 
ing us many personal experiences of the work in 
Cuba, on which field he served as missionary for 
nearly four years. 

Rev. M. B. Clegg made a splendid address on 
the subject of "Missions in the Sunday School," 
speaking of the great importance of the work 
of training the children in missions and empha- 
sizing the attitude of our church toward the 
children. 

Thursday was a very interesting day. The 
general thought for the day was Evangelism. 
Rev. H. H. Mitchell spoke on the subject of 
Every Pastor His Own Evangelist. At eleven 
o'clock Rev. E. K. McLarty, D. D., of Tryon 
Street Church, Charlotte, gave a great address 
on Evangelism. Such a service as we had that 
day will be long remembered by those present. 
The Spirit 's presence was manifest almost from 
the beginning of his opening remarks until the 
closing words of the prayer of consecration 
which followed the address. The message was 
one of unusual power and rang true to Metho- 
dist ideals. Not only did we get to the.-mountain 
top of joy, but many of us were determined then 
and there to return to our charges and by the 
Spirit's help, strive to promote genuine revi- 
vals in all our churches. 

In the afternoon Dr. Frank Siler spoke on the 
"Support of the Ministry, Sunday School 
Work, and gave a survey of the conditions of 
the world. 

In the evening Bishop Atkins waS'-expected, 
but could not attend. Dr. C. W. Byrd, who 
was to fill his place on the program, also failed 
to report, much to the disappointment of the 
large congregation present. The hour was con- 
sumed by addresses by Revs. Albert- Sherrill 
and E. E. Williamson. 

A circulating library was established. 

The District will probably publish a Bulletin. 

It was a very interesting and profitable meet- 
ing and the people of Forest City gave the vis- 
itors a royal reception and hospitable entertain- 
ment. Brother Bowles made us all debtors to 
him for his many kindnesses. The new church 
is splendid. '.'It's a beauty," and a temple of 
God of which the town should feel proud. 

A. C. Swafford, See. 

Morganton, N. C. 



Statesville Missionary and Evangelistic 
Institute 

I desire a little space this week in order to 
give a brief report of our very interesting and 
profitable Institute which has just concluded a 
two day's session in Broad Street Church, 
Statesville. Those who have ever been fortu- 
nate enough to be associated with Dr. Mann, 
know that he never undertakes anything in a 
half-hearted fashion. The Statesville Institute 
held Jan. 14 and 15 reflected his thorough going 
characteristics, his intimate knowledge of condi- 
tions and men, his clear insighn and broad, 
statesman-like leadership of things pertaining 
to the Kingdom of Christ. 

The Institute was especially f Cirtunate in the 
personnel of its members, and especially those 
who engaged in the discussions. Besides the 
preachers and lay delegates of this district, most 
of whom were present, there were present Miss 
Lelia Tuttle, missionary to China ; Frank Siler, 
the eloquent and ubiquitous advocate for mis- 
sions; ELK. McLarty, the prophet-like cham- 
pion of Evangelism ; C. W. Byrd,J;he magnetic 
orator, and preacher ; J. W. Jones, ? our optimis- 
tic insurance man, ever bubbling over with, 
"talk," and pure love for men, and last but 



not least, R. L. Snow, the efficient, business-like 
lay leader of the Statesville district. 

The first session on Thursday morning was 
given over largely to discussions by local speak- 
ers to the general theme of Evangelism. The 
presiding elder, after a. brief devotional service, 
outlined in a few well chosen words the work 
and purposes of the Institute, emphasizing the 
great need for a ministry whose chief purpose 
is the salvation of souls, and for ministers who 
have been quickened by the evangel of God in 
preparation for their great work. 

Following, Rev. C. L. McCain, of the States- 
ville circuit, discussed briefly, but clearly, and 
forcefully, "A Revival — the best method for 
bringing it about. These were, in the opin- 
ion of the speaker: (1) a pastor thoroughly in 
love with his work; (2) the co-operation of the 
church ; ( 3 ) good music. Rev. J. W. Jones next 
spoke, in his inimitable way, on the same sub- 
ject. ' ' I don 't agree with the preceding speaker 
in one thing," began he. "I believe in preach- 
ing doctrinal sermons during protracted ser- 
vices, not the dry-as-dust, controversial kind, 
but live, instructive sermons on great scripture 
themes. That word doctrine is all right. Don't 
it come from doceo, 'I teach,' Prof. Biles? Yes. 
it's all right. As I said, have one central idea, 
and let your whole preaching cluster around 
this theme. Repentance, Sin, Faith, Confes- 
sion and all that line of vital doctrine, that 
makes you feel like saying, 'Why, I want that 
man 's religion and must have it. ' Some of our 
preaching is so inapplicable and scattering that 
if the subject was small-pox the revival would 
never catch it. ' ' 

Rev. G. W. Fink discussed very fully and in- 
terestingly the Pastor as Evangelist, and made 
the point, which can not be emphasized too of- 
ten, that the preacher, to be a Holy Ghost 
preacher, must have himself had a Holy Ghost 
experience. "This," he said, "is the secret of 
power, of success in evangelistic work." Very 
helpful talks were made in the general discus- 
sions following by Rev. C. M. Campbell, pastor 
of Race St., Statesville, and others. 

Speaking on "Things that Help Protracted 
Meetings, ' ' Rev. W. M. Biles, of Newton, said : 
(1) advertise your meetings; (2) interest the 
children; (3) have cottage prayer meetings. 
"God moves in this old world as man moves," 
said the speaker. ' ' God can work only as man 
co-operates. The Kingdom of God is not a small 
business. There is nothing small in the work of 
the pastor." 

"The relation of good music to a successful 
revival and how to provide it for a country 
church," was interestingly discussed by Rev. 
J. W. Jones. 

Full collections and how to secure them, was 
the interesting theme assigned to Rev. T. J. Og- 
burn, of Mt. Zion and Huntersville. The In- 
stitute requested Brother Ogburn to send a copy 
of this address to the Advocate for publication. 

Dr. McLarty 's appeal on behalf of Evangel- 
ism on Friday morning was a masterpiece, and 
must be heard to be appreciated. Dr. Byrd was 
sent to take the place of Bishop Atkins, and won 
golden opinions for himself in his clear-cut, 
convincing style, and forceful delivery. The 
■Conference enjoyed thoroughly the address on 
Thursday night by Miss Lelia Tuttle, teacher in 
McTyeire School for Girls, Shanghai, China. 
Miss Tuttle made a very interesting display of 
Chinese garments, etc., which was interspersed 
with explanations of Chinese customs and side- 
lights on their life, manners, etc. 

This report would not be complete without 
reference to Miss Gertrude Allen, who was in- 
troduced by the presiding elder, as probably 
the youngest Sunday school superintendent in 
Southern Methodism. This is an honor for 
which Statesville district feels proud. Miss Al- 
len is a mere slip of a girl, 14 years old, who 
lives on the Alexander circuit, and has been reg- 
ularly elected to the superintendency of their 
local school. In answer to my question, she 
said very modestly, "We began with four chil- 
dren, besides my own brothers and sisters, in 
an old house, which I had swept and prepared. 
Now we have 39 scholars. I love the work very 
much, and I would like to give my life as a 
foreign missionary if they will have me. ' ' 

, E, 0. Smithdeal, Sec, 
L. T. Mann, P. E. 



Page Eight 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 28, 1915 



Department of Woman's Work 

Conducted oy Mrs. W. R. Harris, Asheville, 2f. G. 



THE MUSTARD SEED 

One planted a seed — 'twas a little 
thing 

To sow in the field of his Lord and 
King — 

A grain of mustard. It grew and 
spread 

Till it sheltered the weary toiler's 
head, 

And under its branches sweet song- 
sters rare 

Sang li>mns of praise as they nested 
there. 

And he who had planted the tiny seed 
Forgot his shame at the humble deed. 

And one gave life — 'twas a little thing, 
But 'twas all that he had to give to his 
Kjng. 

The Master sent him where darkness 
dwelt, 

Where the blind and lame to strange 

idols knelt; 
'Twas a lonely land but he looked 

above 

As he brought to the hopeless the mes- 
sage of love. 

And many whose gropings had been 
in vain 

To the life of the Spirit were born 
again. 

And his life, poured out for a world 
in need, 

Was multiplied like the mustard seed 
— William Merrell Vories, Hachiman, 
Omi, Japan. 



ANNUAL MEETING 

Tomorrow evening at eight o'clock 
in Tryon Street Church, Charlotte, will 
convene the Third Annual Meeting of 
the Woman's Missionary Society of 
the W. N. C. Conference. For many 
weeks this meeting has been looked 
forward to with pleasurable anticipa- 
tion by the workers throughout the 
Conference and daily many prayers 
have ascended for God's blessings upon 
this gathering of his stewards. This 
will be one of the most important 
meetings which we have ever held and 
we trust the greatest. Many ques- 
tions of vital importance are to be dis- 
cussed and every phase of the work 
will be brought out in a most forcible 
and interesting manner. 

It will be very gratifying to our 
workers to know that besides the of- 
ficials of our own Conference we will 
have as visitors Mrs. Hume R. Steele, 
Educational Secretary of the Board of 
Missions; Mrs. James Atkins, former- 
ly Corresponding Secretary of the 
Home Department of our Conference, 
who has just returned from a visit of 
several months to the Orient; Miss 
Leila Judson Tuttle, of McTyeire 
School, Shanghai, China; Miss Frank 
Miller, Deaconess of Winston-Salem; 
Rev. Frank Siler, Missionary Secre- 
tary of the W. N. C. Conference; Mr. 
W. R. Lynch, Welfare Worker, of 
Spray, N. C, and Bishop Atkins who 
will deliver the sermon on Sunday 
morning. 



PROGRAM OF ANNUAL MEETING 
OF THE WOMAN'S MISSIONARY 
SOCIETY W. N. C. CONFERENCE 
Tryon St. Church, Charlotte 



Friday Afternoon — 3 O'clock 

Executive meeting and conference 
of District Secretaries. 

Friday Evening — 8 O'clock 

Devotional Service — Pastor. 
Greetings. 

President's Message — Mrs. L. H. 
Robertson. 

Financial Survey — Mrs. P. N. Pea- 
cock; Mrs. R. L. Hoke. 

Social Hour. 

Saturday Morning 

Devotional Service — Mrs. James At- 
kins. 

Organization. 

Report of Corresponding Secretary, 



Foreign Department — Mrs. L. W. 
Crawford. 

Report of Corresponding Secretary, 
Home Department — Mrs. Frank Siler. 

Report of Third Vice-President — 
Miss Cora Earp. 

Report of Fourth Vice-President — 
Mrs. H. A. Dunham. 

Report of Superintendent of Supplies 
—Mrs. J. L. Woltz. 

Report of Superintendent of Public- 
ity — Mrs. W. R. Harris. 

Report of Distributor of Literature 
— Mrs. W. C. Houston. 

Noon Hour — Memorial Service — 
Mrs. Frank Siler. 

Saturday Afternoon- 

Devotional Service — Miss Frank Mil- 
ler. 

Reports of District Secretaries. 
Meetings of Committees. 

Saturday Evening 
Reception to young people at Trin- 
ity Church. 
Meetings of Committees. 

Sunday 

11 a. m., Sermon — Bishop James At- 
kins. 

3 p. m., Children's Hour. 
8 p. m., Address — Bishop James At- 
kins. 

Monday Morning 

Devotional Service — Miss Lelia Tut- 
tle. 

Report of First Vice-President — 
Mrs. Mattie H. Stewart. 

'Two-minute reports of lady mana- 
gers. 

Institute on New Form of Organiza- 
tion — Mrs. Hume R. Steele, Education- 
al Secretary Board of Missions. 

Address — Mrs. James Atkins. 

Noon Bible Study — Mrs. Hume R. 
Steele. 

Monday Afternoon 

Devotional Service — Mrs. H. A. Dun- 
ham. 

Report of Second Vice-President — 
Mrs. Plato Durham. 

Two-minute reports of young people 
delegates. 

Discussion — Who Has the Larger Op- 
portunity, the Young Woman Who 
Goes or the Young Woman Who Stays 
— Misses Aleez Aycock and Helen 
Weaver, Greensboro College for Wom- 
en. 

Unfinished Reports. 

Monday Evening 
Our Fields — Mrs. Hume R. Steele; 
Miss Leila Tuttle. 

Tuesday Morning 
Devotional Service — Miss Terrie 
Luttrlek. 

Report of City Mission Boards, 
Asheville — Winston-Salem. 

Report of Committee on Social Ser- 
vice. 

Discussion — The Need and Method 
of Co-operatipn Between Church and 
State in Social Service — Mr. W. R. 
Lynch, Welfare Worker, Spray, N. C. 

Report of Committee on Extension 
of Work. 

Discussion — Correlation of the Mis- 
sionary Forces of the Church — Rev. 
Frank Siler, Conference Missionary 
Secretary. 

Pledging for the Conference. 

Noon Hour of Intercession for World 
Peace — Leader, Mrs. Hume R. Steele. 
Tuesday Afternoon 

Devotional Service. 

Unfinished Reports. 

Election of Officers. 

Place of Next Meeting. 

Tuesday Evening 

Closing Session. 

Executive Meeting. 



OFFICERS OF REIDSVILLE 
AUXILIARY 

President Mrs. Lucy Trotter; 1st 
vice-president, Mrs. Wm. Ballard; 2nd 
vice-president, Mrs. Alvis Pearson; re- 
cording secretary, Mrs. E. D. Watt; 
corresponding secretary, Mrs. D. R. Al- 



len; treasurer, Mrs. A. L. Harris; su- 
perintendent of mission study and pub- 
licity, Mrs. A. Wilkinson; superintend- 
ent of social service, Mrs. J. D. Huf- 
fines; superintendent of supplies, Mrs. 
W. S. Blackwell; agent of Missionary 
Voice, Mrs. Florence Brooks. 



INSTALLATION SERVICE AT CEN- 
TRAL CHURCH, ASHEVILLE, N. C. 

A most interesting meeting of the 
Woman's Missionary Society of Cen- 
tral Church, Asheville, N. C, was held 
Monday afternoon, January 18. This 
was the pledge meeting and notwith- 
standing the downpour of rain, there 
was a goodly attendance of members 
and visitors. Several interesting read- 
ings and talks relative to the pledge 
were given, and much interest was 
manifested in making the pledges for 
this year. The society supports its 
own missionary in China, Miss Fran- 
ces Burkhead, Davidson Memorial 
School, Soochow, and the members 
feel that the living link is a great in- 
spiration to them in their work. A 
highly impressive feature of the after- 
noon meeting was the installation of 
the officers, by Rev. J. H. Barnhardt, 
pastor of the church, the service used 
being that suggested by the council. 
At the close of the meeting, tea and 
sandwiches were served. The society 
has raised during the past year all its 
assessment and starts out in 1915 with 
most encouraging prospects. 



HAS CHRISTIANITY FAILED? 

The papers are much exercised with 
the question as to whether Christian- 
ity has failed or not, and many of 
them say it has failed. 

Christianity has not failed. Any 
man who reads his Bible will see that 
Christianity has not failed. Hypoc- 
risy has failed, as it always will; but 
not Christianity. Christianity has not 
failed any more than Truth has failed 
when a liar is apprehended; or than 
Love has failed when a divorce is 
granted, or the Sun has failed when 
night comes on. 

Do not people marry who have never 
loved? How then can their parting 
be charged up to the failure of Love? 

Do not men pretend to stand for 
decency who are themselves living in- 
decent lives? How then can Honor 
and Truth be called failure when their 
perfidy ir, discovered? 

The truth is the Anglo-Saxon is not 
now and never has been a Christian in 
the true sense of the word. "What," 
you ask then, "is a Christian?" And 
the answer is found in the Constitu 
tion of Christianity, the "Sermon on 
the Mount," found in the Bible, in the 
Gospel according to St. Matthew, chap- 
ters 5 to 7 inclusive. 

When Jesus Christ was upon the 
earth in the flesh, He had to speak 
very plainly to the church people of 
his times. He called them hypocrites, 
likened them to whited sepulchres, 
etc. They had the form of Godliness, 
but not the spirit. They made profes- 
sions but they did not believe. They 
uttered prayers, but never prayed. It 
does not matter that they called 
themselves sincere. They were sin- 
cere only because they were shallow 
and refused to look the facts in the 
face. Whenever they looked facts in 
the face, as St. Paul did, whereas they 
thought they were "blameless" they 
would see that they were "wretched." 

So today the Christian nations are 
Christian only in profession, only 
when it is easy. They have been 
evangelized; they have not yet be- 
come Christianized. That is, the gos- 
pel has been preached among them 
and to a large extent they have as- 
sented to it; and indeed accepted it 
as an ideal; but no nation has yet 
accepted the gospel of Jesus as a 
practical working basis of govern- 
ment. 

We cannot say Christianity has fail- 
ed until it has been accepted. We 
are not Christian. The "Christian 
Church" is not Christian to say noth- 
ing of the national We repeat 



Christianity has not failed. Jesus 
Christ did not die in vain, or live ii 
vain. Shall we need less of Chris 
tianity because of this war? Does 
not the war show as nothing else th( 
need of Christianity? Does not th« 
war show more than anything else 
that the only safety is in Christiai 
brotherhood? We can not leave th( 
world to the ambitions of ungodly mei 
and have permanent safety and pros 
perity. There is but one refuge ant 
that is in Christianity as fiducii 
(trusting faith). 

Christianity has not conquered th< 
world yet. That much is true, an< 
that is all that .is true. So the trut 
Christian needs to gird his armor or 
for the battle against Satan and Sir 
and fight the harder. We have nol 
failed; we have just not won. 

Remember that this world is young 
yet. Man has not yet put his foot, 
so far as we know, on all parts oi 
the globe. We have perhaps millions 
of years to go. 

A boy may take up the study oi 
medicine. His friends may call him 
"Doctor" as they often do, as soon 
as he matriculates. He may get a 
little inflated in his freshman year, 
and "palm" himself off on the ignor- 
ant as a real doctor. And in the same 
way this world is not Christian though 
we sometimes pretend to be. 

But can Christianity show prog- 
ress? Certainly. The method of war- 
fare, horrible as it is, is a sign of 
Christianity's success. International 
law which limits war and makes im- 
possible the brutalities of twenty cen- 
turies ago, is the result of Christian 
influence. The very horror we have 
is the result of the gradual dominion 
of a Christian conscience. 

Christianity is emancipating wo- 
man. Christianity has brought popu- 
lar education. Christianity has filled 
the land with hospitals ("visited the 
sick"). Christianity has changed our 
method of dealing with criminals. 
Christianity has abolished slavery. 
Christianity is democratising govern- 
ment. Christianity is substituting in- 
dustrial civilization in the place of a 
military civilization. Christianity is 
eliminating competition in business. 
Christianity is introducing social jus- 
tice. And a thousand other things 
Christianity has done. Decade alter 
decade, century after century, Chris- 
tianity's dominion over mankind is 
gradually spreading; and there is 
hope that ere this old world is dis- 
solved Jesus Christ may reign from 
pole to pole. 

In the midst of war Christianity is 
not one whit daunted, acknowledges 
no defeat, but reports progress and 
greater hope. If the world is convinc- 
ed that it is not Christian, Christian- 
ity will be the gainer. If we all come 
forth with a clearer idea of just what 
Christianity is and the task of Chris- 
tianizing the nation is, then we shall 
all be the gainers. — Christian Record- 
er. 



HELP WANTED LADIES 

Ladles of character may earn nice In- 
come at home every month taking orders 
from friends for REIF'S high class Toilet 
Articles, Fairy Creme, Perfume, Food Fla- 
voring Extracts and full line. Liberal 
commission paid. This Is for married or 
single women, young or old. References 
required. Get our free Instruction book. 
We teach you how to succeed from the 
start. Honorable, dignified work. Write 
now and get territory and beautiful sam- 
pla case. 

United Stores Drug Co., 813 Cherry Street, 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 



RECIPE FOR GRAY HAIR 

To half pint of water add 1 oz. Bay 
Rum, a small box of Barbo Compound, 
and % oz. of glycerine. Apply to tne 
hair twice a week until it becomes the 
desired shade. Any druggist can put 
this up or you can mix it at home at 
very little cost. Full directions for 
making and use come in each box of 
Barbo Compound. It will gradually 
darken atreaked, faded gray hair, and 
removes dandruff. It is excellent for 
falling hair and will make harsh hair 
soft and glossy. It will not color the 
acalp, la not sticky or greasy, and does 
not rub off. 



January 28, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Nine 



Epworth League Department § 

Conducted by Miss A. BtanVy Hall, Hickory, N. 0. X 



How have you started out the New 
Year? Have you made new plans for 
a "Better League in 1915?" If you have 
not. do so at once. 



At the cabinet meeting in December 
in was decided that a short discussion 
of the topic for the week should appear 
in the Advocate columns each week. 
Rev. O. P. Ader has consented to pre- 
pare this discussion each week. We 
hope that it will be helpful. 



We give below a paper written by 
Miss Estelle Crowell, Secretary of the 
Salisbury District, which eh© read at 
the Salisbury Church, oa "The Epworth 
League." It is a splendid paper and 
we hope every Leaguer and pastor wiil 
read it. She reports that they are 
ready to organize a League in Salis- 
bury. We hope to have a report from 
them soon. 



EPWORTH LEAGUE 

In the last two decades rapid strides 
have been made in the conforming of 
the spirit of church work more exactly 
with the ideals of youth. Young peo- 
ple have proved their value in the com- 
plex machinery of the kingdom. Today 
they hold responsibilities that used to 
be the exclusive monopolies of their 
fathers and mothers. In every field of 
usefulness and in every department of 
organization they are acknowledged as 
co-workers and leaders. 

Just twenty-five years ago a number 
of young people's missionary societies, 
previously existing in the Methodist 
Episcopal- Church, South, were organ- 
ized into a cooperative union with a dis- 
trict constitution and plan of work. 
This movement was widespread, 
though not of great strength numer- 
ically and it was non-denominational. 

The name of this organization is 
Epworth League and it's purpose is, 
"The promotion of piety and loyalty 
to our church among the young pr 
pie, their education in church history, 
and their encouragement in works of 
grace and charity." The sum of all this 
is consecration, preparation and serv- 
ice. Its chief end is to make religion 
the life and business of the young and 
to show the beauty of piety. 

There are three kinds of chapters, 
Senior, Intermediate and Junior. The 
Senior chapter embraces young pp 
pie between the ages of fifteen and 
thirty. The Junior chapter embraces 
boys and girls from the ages of seven 
to sixteen. The age limit of the Inter- 
mediate is from fourteen to seventeen. 

A special provision has been made 
for boys from twelve to eighteen. 
They may organize a chapter having 
only boys of their own age for mem- 
bers. They may secure a separate 
charter and conduct all their work en- 
tirely apart from the girls and older 
boys. This chapter is known as the 
Boys' League. 

There are two kinds of members of 
an Epworth League chapter. Active 
members are those who take part in 
the distinctively spiritual work of the 
chapter. They are required to sub- 
scribe or assent to the Epworth Lea- 
gue rule: "The application to daily 
life of our motto, 'All for Christ.' " 
Or, with the approval of the pastor 
and the council, this as an aid to the 
realization of the Epworth League mot- 
to, "All for Christ," I will make it the 
practice of my life to read the Bible 
and pray at some specified hour each 
day, to be faithful in attending the ser- 
vices of my own church and will en- 
deavor each week to bring some one 
to the church service or otherwise do 
some personal work for the salvation 
of souls. Associate members are those 
who are not professing Christians, but 
who attend the chapter meeting and 



take part in such features of the pro- 
gram as they may elect. 

There are four departments of Ep- 
worth League work: namely, the De- 
partment of Worship and Evangelism, 
Department of Social Service, k Depart- 
ment of Culture and Recreation, and 
the Department of Missionary Work. 

The true business of the first depart- 
ment, that of worship and evangelism, 
is to give to young people a personal 
sense of the nearness of God. A fuller 
answer would be that the first depart- 
ment aims to help young people ex- 
press the admiration and reverence 
they feel for God and also to lead 
them to forth the habit of complete 
dependence Upon Hiw. "To prepare 
the heart with a message and to loosen 
the tongue with enthusiasm for speak- 
ing the truth is the finished work of 
the First Department." 

The aim of the second department, 
Social Service, is (1) to give relief to 
the oppressed, the afflicted and the 
needy, (2) to seek to prevent evils 
which arise from causes that may be 
removed and (3) to lend a helping 
hand in all worthy undertakings as 
opportunity may be found. 

The purpose of the third depart- 
ment is to improve the social powers 
of young people by developing their 
intellects and broadening their sym- 
pathies. Real social life is impossible 
without some degree of intellectual 
improvement. A common interest 
among young people, be it a book, a 
person or an experience furnishes a 
basis of fellowship. To multiply the 
common interests of any group is to 
add and elevate, their social life. "So- 
cial means companionable." Conver- 
sation depends upon ideas possessed 
in common by a number of people. 
The more ideas the more freely will 
the talk flow. Hence, this department 
fails embarrassingly in its attempt to 
conduct "socials" unless it seeks dili- 
gently to stimulate, nourish and direct 
the intellectual life. This department 
is probably the most attractive to most 
boys and girls. The programs for 
these meetings are many and varied. 
Among others these are sugest.ed: 
"Have an evening with a great author, 
an essay or essays on his works and 
character, with quotations from his 
writings by members of the League." 
"Take a nation, modern or ancient, dis- 
cuss its customs, religion, history, peo- 
ples, and its end or future. 'The Lea- 
guers may add interest to this by 
wearing simple imitations of costumes 
or otherwise in their dress suggesting 
national manners." "Have an even- 
ing with the martyrs (as Huss, Fox, 
Cranmer, Savonarola) ; with eminent 
Methodists and other Christian heroes 
as Bunyan, Knox, a Kempis, Wycliffe 
and Carey." A "debating club" will 
furnish endless enjoyment and bring 
astonishing benefit. 

When apparent Christian activity 
has no missionary side it is really un- 
christian and selfish. The Epworth 
League needs the missionary objec- 
tive to call forth its best energies and 
develope its highest life. The section 
relating to this department in the con- 
stitution of the Senior League is as 
follows: "The Department of Mission- 
ary Work shall promote an interest in 
and disseminate intelligence of the 
work of missions at home and abroad; 
provide for mission study classes, the 
collection of a missionary library and 
other help; appoint leaders and pro- 
vide for the monthly missionary meet- 
ing; and collect, take charge of and 
disburse money for missionary pur- 
poses Under the direction of the pastor 
and cabinet." 

Now let us see What have been some 
Of the contributions of the League 1 to 
the church. The General Secretary of 
the League affirms that scarcely a 



Standard Form 
Collection Envelopes 



Western North Carolina Conference 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South 

HOLT'S CHAPEL 



FOR PASTOR'S SALARY 



AMOUNT 



iNjame 



Date. 



191... 



Dollar* Cent* 



MISSIOWS AND CONFERENCE COLLECTIONS 

Western North Carolina Conference 

Methodist Episcopal Church, South 
MOUNT ZION CHURCH 



Name. 
Date .. 



Dollar 



Cents 



$1.90 for lOOO, delivered 

$1.40 for additional 1000, delivered 
FOR EITHER FORM 



This price is based on using the above forms, changing name of church 
only. The large envelope is manila, and of the quality regularly used for 
Pastor's Salary collections. The small envelope can be furnished in white, 
green or cherry. Its difference in color and size from the Pastor's Salary 
form makes it ideal for Missions and Conference Collections. 

If special form is desired the price will average $2.40 for the first 1000, 
and $1 40 for additional I000's, delivered. 

Special rates on large quantities. 

The Advocate Press, Greensboro, N. C. 



know. Wj 
choice of 
speed a: 



You The The The 
Decide: School: Methods: Results' 

w EWsons Why You Should Enroll With Us 

We teaicE Stenotypy, the fastest method of writing. Our courses teach yomto 





in you to grasp your opportunity. Latest improved methods. Your 
different systems of shorthand, two of them hold world's record for 
accuracy. : 

s and terms most reasonable. Real business courses as taught at a real 
I college. Results unequalled. Twenty-five students recently placed in 

further information and terms. Do not put off this important step. 

L BUSINESS COLLEGE, ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 

T S. SPRADUN. President 



PAPER SHELL PECAN TREES. 

is our best salesman. If you buy 200 or more trees we will dynamite your land 
and plant your trees FREE. CORDELE NURSERIES, Cordele, Georgia 



Best varieties. Choice 
stock. Our reputation 



young man enters the ministry but 
who has been a central figure in some 
chapter. And it is a fair estimate that 
at leaot one thousand men are in the 
ministry of our own church through 
the spiritual work of the League. Six- 
teen missionaries from the South Geor- 
gia League alone are now in the for- 
eign field. A secretary of the Board 
of Missions of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church »at down at a breakfast in In- 
dia with one hundred missionaries who 



had all come through the League. The 
Epworth League hastened by several 
years the opening of Korea, practical- 
ly made possible the establishment of 
the Cuban mission and today is under- 
taking the entire support of the work 
in that field. 

Do we need an Epworth League in 
our church? Do we want an Epworth 
League in our church? Can we have 
an Epworth League in our church? If 
not, why not? 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 28, 1915 



THE DECLARATION OF AMERICA 



We, the citizens , of the American Continent, embracing peoples of every race and tongue, 
affording a true demonstration of the brotherhood of man, being about to commemorate the 
one hundredth year of unbroken peace along three thousand miles of unfortified boundary, 
do hereby solemnly publish and declare that the time has come for the peace-loving powers of 
the world to unite in a League of Nations, founded on such principles, and organized in 
such form, as shall conduct to the preservation of life, liberty and happiness throughout 
every quarter of the world. 

We hold these truths to be self-evident : League of Nations for the present disastrous chaos 

1st. That "this is assuredly the opportunity for upon which the Armament Ring thrives, 

which a people and a government like ours were 12th. That the Nations of the League should 

raised up, the opportunity not only to speak, but mutually agree to respect the neutrality and sov- 

actually to embody and exemplify the counsel of ereignty of each other. 

peace and amity." — (President Woodrow Wilson 13th. That in order to provide for the common 

in his latest message to Congress.) defense and to insure permanency, the Nations of 

2nd. That the great masses of citizens of one na- the League should create a powerful Exchequer to 

tion have no real hatred for the people of any other be known as the Hague Treasury, which shall hold 

nation. a large Guaranty Fund. 

3rd. That there is no dispute that can arise be- 14th. That the Nations of the League should 

tween nations which cannot be satisfactorily set- bind themselves to abide by the conventions of the 

tied by arbitration or by the Hague Court of Arbi- League, each Nation depositing with the Hague 

tral Justice. Treasury a sum equal to one-third of its appropri- 

4th. That while it should be our constant policy ations for armament expended in the year 1913; 

to make provision for national peace and safety, and in succeeding years, beginning with 1916, each 

it is essential in so far as possible, to secure the Nation should pay into the Hague Treasury a sum 

co-operation of all other nations. equal to one-third of its appropriation for arma- 

5th. That the foremost efforts of the American ment during the year, 

people should now be directed to the task of pre- 15th. That the Nations of the League should per- 

venting the recurrence of war rather than to prep- petuate the Hague Conference as its Legislative As- 

arations for war. sembly, meeting periodically to make all rules to 

6th. That the union of the peace-loving nations become law unless vetoed by the Nations within a 

in a League of Peace should create the greatest stated period. 

possible strength for defense — far greater than 16th. That all questions that cannot be settled 

any one nation could create alone. by diplomacy should be arbitrated or referred to 

7th. That the two most dangerous factors to be the Hague Court, 

eliminated from future international affairs are: 17th. That treaties, conventions and the legis- 

lst, the "Competition of Armaments" which can lation of the Hague Conference should be enforced 

and must be superceded by union and co-operation under penalty of forfeiting the Guaranty Fund 

of military forces; 2nd, Secrecy in the conduct of previously deposited with the Hague Treasury by 

diplomatic negotiations. each signatory Nation and of expulsion from the 

8th. That neither any nation as a whole, nor any League, 

class of persons, save manufacturers of armaments 18th. That the Nations should disarm to the 

and munitions, derive any benefits from the ravages point where the combined forces of the League 

of war. " shall be one hundred per cent, higher than those 

9th. That the agents of armament builders are 'of the most heavily armed Nations outside of 

continually perpetrating international disputes and the League. 

agitating for greater armaments which, in turn, are 19th. That the combined forces of the League 

bound to result in successive disasters if allowed to should be maintained for defensive purposes and 

continue. should be under the command of an Executive Coun- 

10th. That with the World unorganized as at cil, having recourse to the Hague Fund, 

present and practical anarchy existing in inter- 20th. That any Nation outside the League should 

national affairs, the Armament Ring holds govern- have permission at all times to join the League by 

ments under absolute despotism. These persons are signing the articles of agreement, and, by depos- 

striving for unlimited military and naval expendi- iting with the Hague Treasury the stipulated 

tures, and go on inventing war scares to terrify guaranty fund amounting to one-third of its average 

the public and to terrify government officials. annual appropriation for armament in the three 

11th. That the most pressing duty of civilization years immediately preceding the year of its appli- 

at this moment is to make itself stable and perma- cation for membership. — Niagara Executive Peace 

nent by substituting unity of action through a Committee . 

Firmly believing in the need of immediate action, we do hereby petition our President and 
elected representatives in our federal government to invite all governments of the World to 
appoint delegates who shall meet at' Niagara Falls, N. Y., on the twenty-fourth day of May, 
1915, or immediately thereafter, for the purpose of constituting a permanent League of Na- 
tions in which all military and naval forces may be united in order to promote national 
safety and to facilitate the judicial settlement of international disputes. 



> COMMITTEE. 



Page Ten 



«•> * 

• 'Our Children's Home* 

• . Conducted by Walter Thompson, Supt. X 

- A PRESSING.: CALL 

Below is a copy of the letter sent to 
our Sunday school superintendents; 

January 20, 1915. 
Dear Brother:— - ; - ' ; 1 

January 31st is the 5th Sunday. 

The Home is under the greatest 
pressure in, its history — just as all 
Charitable agencies have been hard 
pressed to meet necessary demands 
for help during the past few months. 

While our calls have been more ur- 
gent, our income since Conference has 
been very small indeed. The 5th Sun- 
day in November was bad and we have 
receiyyd less than half what we usual- 
ly receive from a 5th Sunday Collec- 
tion. „ 

Here is a letter which I have just re- 
ceived. I should be glad to have you 
read it to your school on the 4th Sun- 
day: 

"About a year ago we organized a 
little Methodist Church in the eastern 
part of this city which is known as 
East M. E. Church. It now has a mem- 
bership of about twenty-nine who are 
all approximately poor people. We 
have one especially who is in very 
needy circumstances and who deserves 
help, and while I attempt to write this 
letter I do so with tears in my eyes 
and prayers in my heart for this Moth- 
er and little ones. 

"We have stood by this Home and 
helped until we have come to the def- 
inite" conclusion that something else 
must be done. One member of this 
little Church visited this Mother and 
Children yesterday with some food 
supplies and upon arrival found that 
not a mouthful had been eaten there 
that day with the exception of a few 
small turnips which their poor neigh- 
bors had given them. 

"This Widow wants to get her chil- 
dren in your Orphanage if possible, and 
if you have the remotest idea that you 
can take these children which I hope 
and pray that you can then will you 
kindly let me hear from you by return 
mail relative to the matter and I will 
gladly come over and bring the Moth- 
er to see you before entering the Chil- 
dren that you may know exactly the 
infelicitous condition." 

The above is not an unusual letter. 
If we do anything to help, it is be- 
cause you enable us to do so by your 
help. 

May we not have a good contribu- 
tion? 

Very truly yours 

Walter Thompson, 
Superintendent. 



RECEIVED ON SPECIAL, GENERAL 
AND TEN PER CENT. 
COLLECTIONS 

Wadesboro Methodist Church, 
Wadesboro, Rev. Geo. D. Herman, 
$40.00; Mooresville Church, Moores- 
ville, Rev. C. S. Kirkpatrick, $25.00; 
Highlands Church, Glenville, Rev. W. 
C. Bowden, $30.00; Mrs. Hugh Chat- 
ham, Winston, $200.00; Mrs. Etta Par- 
lier, Winston, $5.00; A Friend, $5.00; 
Wadesboro Methodist Church, Wades- 
boro, Rev. Geo. D. Herman, $25.00; 
Boone Charge, Boone, Rev. D. P. Wa- 
ters,, $3.00. Total, $333.00. 

FIFTH SUNDAY COLLECTIONS 

Shady Grove Sunday School, East 
Bend, W. H. Hindal, $1.00; Advance 
Sunday School, Advance, F. M. ,Mark- 
land, $3.00. Total, $4.00. 



BUILDING FUND 

Men's Bible Class, Hickory, W. A. 
Rudisill, $75.00; J. H, Pitts, Catawba, 
$25.00; Hon. Lee S. Overman, Salis- 
bury, $37.50; Miss Anna Lankford, Sa- 
luda, $5.00; A,S. Mpore, Saluda,. $2.00; 
Mrs. M. W. Rice, Candler, $5.00; W. A. 
Snyder, North Wilkesboro, $5.00. To- 
tal, $154.50. 



DONATIONS IN KIND 

Woman's Missionary Society, New- 
ton, Mrs. Ida Trollinger, 2 barrels of 
notions, canned fruit, etc. 



LAYMEN'S MISSIONARY MOVE- 
MENT, PRES3YTERIAN CHURCH 
IN U. S., CHARLOTTE, N. C., FEB- 
RUARY 16-18, 1915 
For the above occasion Southern Rail- 



way has granted greatly reduced round 
trip fares from all points. Tickets to 
be sold on February 14th and 15th, also 
for trains scheduled to reach Charlotte 
by noon February 16th. Final limit of 
tickets midnight of February 22nd. 
. For detailed information, Pullman 
reservations, etc., apply to any Agent 
Southern Railway, or, 
R. H. DeButtes, D. P. A., Charlotte, N. C. 



It is, therefore, a superficial and 
mocking theory of human happiness 
which concerns itself mainly with cir- 
cumstances. What is wanted is a prin- 
ciple which will put all accidental con- 
ditions in their right place, and per- 
sistently remind man that "the life is 
more than bread," and that apparent 
failure may be real success. — Joseph 
Parker. 



January 28, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Eleven 



MISSIONARY NOTES 

FROM FIELD SECRETARY 



Jan. 17-18, Lincolntcn, Z. Paris, P. C. 
—For Mission Special, $65.00. They 
hope to raise $150.00, which, with For- 
eign Mission assessment of $108.00, will 
enable them to support a native preach- 
er in Japan. Conference Mission Emer- 
gency Fund, $120.00 in four annual pay- 
ments by Dr. L. A. Crowell. 

* * * * 
Jan. 19-20, Charlotte District Insti- 
tute at Marshville — J. C. Rowe, Presid- 
ing Elder; Jno. W. Gulledge, Dirtrict 
Lay Leader. Both present. A goodly 
representation of the preachers and 
laymen from the district present and 
participating in the discussion. By re- 
quest of Presiding Elder, the District 
Lay Leader presided at most sessions. 
Miss Lelia Tuttle gave two helpful ad- 
dresses on China and her observations 
around the world Dr. McLarty made 
his address on Evangelism. Dr. Rowe, 
Dr. Marr, Brother Abernethy, Brother 
Gulledge, Brother Cole, Conference Lay 
Leader, and others, spoke. Round ta- 
ble conferences were iheld about the 
three themes of Evangelism, Finances 
and the Sunday School. The Sunday 
schools of the district will direct their 
monthly missionary offerings to Dr. S. 
H. "Wainright, executive head of the 
Christian Literature Society of Japan. 
This does not apply to schools having 
Foreign Specials of their own. Brother 
Gulledge will superintend this interest. 
Sunday schools will send their offer- 
ings to him. Three groups in the three 
counties respectively of district, of 
reading circles were formed, to be di- 
rected by Brothers Herman, Abernethy 
and Falls. Dr. McLarty is District 
Manager. The books to be read, as in 
all the Conference circles, are those 
which relate to evangelism. The Con- 
ference Committee on Evangelism, E. 
K. McLarty chairman, was instructed 
to take up with General Committee on 
Evangelism at Nashville, the question 
of tracts suitable for use in the revival. 
It was suggested that a call be made 
to members of conference — in fact a 
general one — for tracts to be submitted 
to Conference Committee and the Gen- 
eral Committee for publication and dis- 
tribution. Belief was freely expressed 
that tracts written by persons person- 
ally known would be read with more 
interest and effect than those by un- 
known parties. Dr. J. R. Jerome, of 
Wingate, gave me a subscription of 
S100.00 in four annual payments to Con- 
ference Mission Emergency Fund. 
* * * * 
Jan. 20-21, Greensboro District Insti- 
tute, in beautiful new "Wesley Memorial 
Church, High Point, J. H. Weaver, Pre- 
siding Elder; N. L. Eure, District Lay 
Leader. Dr. "Weaver was present and 
Presided over all sessions. Judge Eure 
is a member of the Legislature and was 
not present. A strong program was 
carried out with notable addresses by 
Dr: McLarty, Miss Tuttle and Bishop 
Atkins. Under topic, "Deficits Last 
Quarter — Cause and Remedy," the 
black spots in Conference exhibit were 
carefully gone over with strong convic- 
tion that with proper and prompt steps 
for the every member canvass in all 
churches the same may be avoided this 
year. W. O. Goode was made manager 
of reading circle. Rev. "W. M. Mullen, 
in evangelistic work at Guantanamo, 
Cuba, is the district missionary for the 
Sunday schools. He is a Vanderbiit 
graduate. 



McLarty spoke Thursday night; Bishop 
Atkins Friday morning at eleven; Miss 
Tuttle that afternoon. Bishop Atkins 
brings a cheering and convincing mes- 
sage back with him from his last visit 
to Korea, Japan and China. The read- 
ing circle for entire district with pre- 
siding elder as general manager, was 
divided into three groups, R. M. Court- 
ney, C. M. Short, and R. L. Pope, lay- 
man of Thomasville, managers. A num- 
ber of laymen throughout the confer- 
ence have joined reading circle. Rev. 
J. "W. Frank in evangelistic work Na~ 
katsu, Japan, a former Davidson Coun- 
ty boy, was adopted as district mis- 
sionary for Sunday schools, with R. B. 
Crawford, treasurer. 

* * * * 

The work has been planned. The 
plans must be worked to justify the 
Institutes. 

* * » * 

A note from Brother Willis states 
that Brother Sprinkle use the Advo- 
cate as Mt. Airy District Bulletin. 

* * * * 

Jan. 24, Lexington, A. W. Plyler, P. 
C, Geo. L. Hackney, S. S. Supt. A 
great day at Lexington. The District 
institute had prepared the way for an 
advance. The Sunday school officers 
and teachers by previous announce- 
ment met at 9:30 in the Junior Phila- 
thea room for Conference on "How to 
Make the Sunday School More Effec- 
tively Missionary." The school ob- 
serves first Sunday and takes collec- 
tion for missions. Last year the 
amount was $100.00. This year they 
will observe fourth Sunday to conform 
to new law of Discipline, and contrib- 
ute at least $175.00 to a special mis- 
sionary. Following the teachers' and 
officers' meeting, I faced a splendid 
Sunday school in the elegant new 
school building, so arranged as to he a 
oart of the larger auditorium at preach- 
ing services. The pledges in school, 
oreaching service and afternoon can- 
vass, including foreign mission assess- 
ment already provided for in budget, 
amounted to $550.00. The Sunday 
=^hool and church will support a mis- 
sionary at $600.00. Thus another of 
the strong stations of the Conference 
takes its place in the advance col- 
umns. Hurry up. Broad Street, States- 
ville and Wadesboro! 



The generosity of Tryon St., Char- 
lotte, in consenting for Dr. McLarty to 
give nearly two weeks to a tour of the 
Conference in the interest of evangel- 
ism will no doubt encourage other of 
our stronger charges gladly to part 
temporarily with their pastors for the 
good of the larger number. Dr. Mc- 
Larty's work without compensation — 
with scarcely his traveling expenses — 
will no doubt suggest to pastors al- 
ready well provided for the possible 
service they can render" in needy 
"laces without financial renumeration. 
Let pastors ponder well the meaning 
of this committee on evangelism and 
be ready to render aid at the call of 
the presiding elders and preachers in 
charge. 



Jan. 21-22, Winston District Institute, 
at Lexington, H. K. Boyer, Presiding 
Elder; R. B. Crawford, District Lay 
Leader. The latter was not present. A money" 
majority of the pastors and several e*.**™^ 
laymen attended. A well arranged pro- 
gram was carried out. Strong, clear 
resolutions were adopted touching re- 
vivals, finances and education the 
three Conference lines of endeavor 



It Is a Burning & Shame 

that so many Churches are without sufficient 
insurance, and not properly safe-guarded 
against fire. 

The National 
Mutual Church 
Insurance Co., 
of Chicago— The 
Methodist Mutual 

furnish e s 
protecti on 
and assists 
in preven- 
tion. Also 
■writes tor- 
nado insur- 
ance. Take 
part and you 
can save 



pay- 
ments; profits 
to policy hold, 
ftrs. And your 
Ciicroh Is en> 




PRIZE ESSAY 

Through the generosity or a resident 
of California, and in connection with 
the Panama-Pacific International Ex- 
position, the National Education Asso- 
ciation is able to offer a prize of one 
thousand dollars for the best essay on 
"The Essential Place of Religion in 
Education, with an Outline of a Plan 
for Introducing Religious Teaching 
into the Public Schools." 

Religion is to be defined in a way 
not to run counter to the creeds of 
Protestant, Roman Catholic, or Jew. 
The essential points to be observed 
are "A Heavenly Father, who holds 
nature and man alike in the hollow of 
His hand;" the commandment of Hillel 
and Jesus of Nazareth, "Thou shalt 
love the Lord thy God with all thy 
heart, and with all thy soul, and with 
all thy mind, and thy neighbor as 
thyself;" the high ethical teachings 
and spirit or service and sacrifice in- 
dicated in the Sermon on the Mount. 

Notice of intention to file an essay 
must be given the Secretary of the As- 
sociation by April 1, 1915. Essays will 
be limited to ten thousand words and 
must be in the possession of the Sec- 
retary by June 1, 1915. Six typewritten 
copies must be furnished in order that 
the preliminary reading may be done 
independently. 

The right is reserved by the Associa- 
tion to publish not only the prize essay, 
but any others which may be submit- 
ted in competition, copyright privileges 
f o be vested in the Association for all 
such. 

National Education Association, 
D. W. Springer, Secretary. 



Paint Without Oil 

Remarkable Discovery That Cut* Down 
the Cost of Paint Seventy- 
Five Per Cent. 



TO THE FRIENDS OF TEMPERANCE 

About the time you read this notice 
our bill to prohibit the delivery of liq- 
uor for beverage purposes will be in- 
troduced and if you want to see a law 
that will shut the jugs out of North 
Carolina passed, write your represen- 
tative a strong letter and ask him to 
give his unqualified support to this 
measure. In addition to the petitions 
and resolutions that are being sent in, 
personal letters from all parts of the 
State should be sent. Such an appeal 
always reaches the individual and it is 
hard to overestimate its influence. 
Please attend to this at once. 

R. L. Davis, Superintendent, 

North Carolina Anti-Saloon League. 



A Free Trial Package Is Mailed to Every- 
one Who Writes 

A. L. Rice, a prominent manufacturer 
of Adams, N. Y., has discovered a process 
of making a new kind of paint without the 
use of oil. He calls it Powdrpaint. It 
comes in the form of a dry powder and ail 
that is required is cold water to make a 
paint weather proof, fire proof and as dur- 
able as oil paint. It adheres to any sur- 
face, wood, stone or brick, spreads and 
looks like oil paint and costs about one- 
fourth as much. 

Write to Mr. A. L. Rice, Manufr, 144 
North St., Adams, N. Y., and he will send 
you a free trial package, also color card 
and full information showing you how you 
can save a good many dollars. Write to- 
day. 



THE LATEST GERMAN GUN 

A special from Berlin, January 25th, 
says: 

Remarkable figures are given regard- 
ing the new German gun by a German 
gun expert, quoted in a Berlin paper. 
The figures are quoted to answer some 
similar figures given in the London 
Times relative to the guns of the Ger- 
man and British armies. The claim is 
made that this new Krupp gun will 
shoot three miles further than any 
British gun yet devised. Its projectile 
will weigh a ton and develop a velocity 
of 3,700 feet a minute. 

This expert figures that it has fifty 
per cent, more muzzle force than the 
British gun with a range of 42 kilome- 
ters (28 miles). The channel at Dover 
is 22 miles wide and the guns can be 
fired from Calais and will drop projec- 
tiles six miles inland on the British 
coast. 



I will not allow that any life is suc- 
cessful, in the highest sense, which has 
not an ideal element, which does not 
recognize its wonderful relation to the 
sum of things, which does not expand 
and thrill with its sense of tthis rela- 
tion, which is not deeply stirred with 
thankfulness for all the use and splen- 
dor that minister unti us from the mo- 
ment of our arrival here until we go 
the way that all must go at length. — 
John White Cbadwick. 



A large charity is the growth of 
years, the last result of many trials. — 
Stopford A. Brooke. 

To apply to others in- charity the 
knowledge one has used against one's 
self judgment, — this is the hard thing. 
— W. H. Mallock. 

It is one of the heaviest penalties of 
wrong thinking and of wrong living, 
that they blur, if they do not obliter- 
ate, the very perception of good and 
evil. — Mary Clemmer. 

When one has learned to seek the 
honor that cometh from God only, he 
will take the withholding of the honor 
that comes from man very quietly in- 
deed. — George Macdonald. 

Our Foreign Advertising is in Charge of 
Jacobs & Co., Clinton, S. C, 

SOLICITING OFFICES: 

New York— 118 E. 28th St.... E. L. Gould 

Chicago^420 Advertising Bldg.—W. B. Porcher 

Detroit— Hotel Tuller C. L. Winn 

St. Louis— 1500 Central Natl. BankBldg., 

M. E. Gammon 

Nashville— 161 8th Ave. N J. M. Riddle. Jr. 

Atlanta— Wesley Memorial Bldg...J. B. Keough 

Asheville, N. C— 421 S. Main St G. H. Ligon 

Philadelphia— 1421 Arch St A. O'Danicl 

Richmond, Va.— Murphy Hotel.. _J. W. Ligon 




THE GREATEST BIBLE BARGAIN 



A 

GENUINE 

7.50 



( HOLM A N ) 

J India Paper V. 

I Self-Pronouncing ( 

v BIBLE ' 



FOR ONLY 

4ac Carefully Wrapped 
• £Q and sent Postpaid 
™" In a box 



Authorized version, printed from the clearest type 
ever used In a Bible, large bold face open print 
with liberal spacing bet ween the words andllne3 

•PRINTED ON THE FINEST INDIA PAPER MADE 

The Text is Self-Pronouncing with references. It has a new Concord 
ance, alphabetically arranged and with analytical and comparative 
features and 50,000 References also New Biblical Atlas with Fifteen 
Colored Maps and Complete Index to Same. 

BOUND IN GENUINE PERSIAN MOROCCO, divinity circuit, 
full leather linings, silk sewed, silk head bands and 
marker, special flat opening reinforced binding that 
will not break In the back. 

The size Is 5H x 8 Inches-only one Inch thick. 



UUed to share In theie benefit* IT IS tP TO YOU. I 
for applications and particulars address 
HENBT P. MAGJXL, See. and Kanaser 
which head up in pastor/church leader Wn. *«h H.rXV.;&.TTi! U ebr..h s«* 
and Sunday school superintendent. Dr. »u leitmBmiuu,, mnh m j««.™>n. Unurui<, kt. 



This India Paper Bfble Compared 
with one of ordinary paper, con- 
taining' the aame number si 
sagas and aame «Ue type. 

Aikll'uss (Jli u.i 



£pi*m4n of Typ*. 

17 T TTom that time Je'§ua be- 
gan to preach, and to say, n Repent : 
ior the kingdom of hoaven is at 



ai _ «7nnV Publlohor'o 80 

N0. 700 A Prloo ilSS postpaid lor 

... i ... v. •. .> W * \JCA i ili, (jreeutiljuro, i\. 



4£2 



Page Twelve 



NOETH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 28, 191 



The Sunday School Lesson 



FIRST QUARTER — LESSON V- 
JANUARY 31, 1915 



The Birth of Samson 
Judges 13:8-16; 24,25 



f Golden Text — Beware, I pray thee, 
and drink no wine or strong drink. 
Judg. 13:4. 

Summary of the Lesson 
A clever man of letters once said 
that if you want to have a great man 
the place to begin is with his grand- 
father. In the Samson story we be- 
gin with the mother of the hero, a 
certain habit of life on his mother's 
part is to prepare for the coming of 
the new life to the world. The angel 
of Jehovah gives very specific direc- 
tions as to the conduct of the wo- 
man who is to be the mother of Sam- 
son. She is to abstain from wine and 
strong drink, from all that comes 
from the vine and from all that is 
ceremonially unclean. The task of 
developing a worthy mother seems to 
be the great matter in the making of 
a hero. 

The Mother of Samson 

Abraham Lincoln used to say with 
deep feeling that he owed everything 
to his "angel mother." In the hard 
and lonely and primitive life of his 
boyhood one figure impressed him pow- 
erfully. The mother who passed out 
of his life so early made an inefface- 
able mark upon his manhood. 

The remarkable thing about the be- 
ginnings of the Samson narrative lies 
just in the great emphasis put upon 
the behaviour of Samson's mother. 
Manoah, her husband, is much more 
interested in the matter of how the 
child is to be treated. He prays es- 
pecially that the one who announced 
the coming of the child may return 
and "teach us what we shall do unto 
the child." Then, when the prayer 
is granted and the angel of Jehovah 
appears, Manoah asks, "What shall 
be the ordering of the child? and how 
shall we do unto him?" In reply the 
angel repeats what has already been 
said about the manner of life to be 
assumed by the mother, and adds 
nothing at all about the child. The 
matter of urgent importance is clear- 
ly the behavior of the mother. 

A keen and hard-headed newspaper 
reporter in a certain western city, 
who was constantly assigned to du- 
ties which brought him into the pres- 
ence of temptation and evil, used to 
make this prayer: "O God, make me 
worthy of the woman whom I hope 
some day to make my wife." In all 
his testing experiences he was try- 
ing to prepare for the home which he 
believed would one day be his. 

The strict discipline laid upon the 
mother of Samson suggests that one 
of the gravest responsibilities of life 
is the preparation for . motherhood. 
Very early the prayer may be offered 
up, "O God, make me worthy of the 
innocent children I hope to see clus- 
tering about my knees and calling me 
'mother.' " A selfish and artificial and 
flippant girlhood has made many a wo- 
man incapable of being the greatest 
sort of mother. The message of this 
ancient story to the women of today 
is that a life of noble self-control on 
the part of a mother is a supreme 
gift to a son. The preparation for 
motherhood ought to begin years and 
years before the little child opens 
small eyes to look upon a mysterious 
world. 

The Abridgment of Personal Liberty 

"A great many things are possible 
for the devil which would not be pos- 
sible for <U><1," was the observation of 
a brilliant and penetrating thinker. 
Jn truth every step in the develop' 
men't of charactef'is taken by means 
of abridgment of personal liberty. All 



growth in taste brings limits of liber- 
ty. All development of civilization 
costs many abridgments of personal 
liberty. The recognition of human 
rights limits the liberty of tyrants; 
the recognition of property rights 
limits the liberty of roving savages. 
The acceptance of limitations for the 
sake of advancing life is the very na- 
ture of progress. 

The recognition of these facts gives 
new significance to the command 
which the wife of Manoah received to 
abstain from some things as a prepa- 
ration for motherhood. The prohibi- 
tion of wine strikes us as a mattter 
of particular importance. The liberty 
to drink intoxicants stands right 
across the pathway of advancing civ- 
ilization, and multitudes of people are 
coming to see that it costs far more 
than it is worth. Taken in the large ; 
it means the liberty to decrease hu- 
man efficiency. It means the liberty 
to lower the tone of the whole life 
It means the liberty to spread poverty 
and to increase crime. It means the 
liberty to corrupt youth, to debauch 
maturity and to embitter old age. It 
means the liberty to set free lawless 
emotions, to take from the will all 
stern and noble self-control and to 
weaken the fiber of the mind. Well 
would it be if every mother ana every 
son would take a vow of perpetual ab 
stinence from all which intoxicates. 

Life is not robbed of anything of 
real or lasting value by the abridg- 
ment of personal liberty which comes 
at the command of true progress and 
developing civilization. There is no 
false asceticism in doing without the 
things which poison the life of the 
community and deplete the life of the 
individual. We develop appreciation 
for ten higher joys for every one of 
the lower indulgences which we sur- 
render. 

The Man of Wine 

"I can control everything in my 
kingdom except that which is under 
my own hat," said a certain European 
monarch. Samson did not live a life 
of steady and consistent self-control. 
Indeed, it has been wisely said that 
we should remember him as a warn- 
ing rather than as an example. He 
was a man of physical strength and 
of moral weakness. He had never de- 
veloped the muscles of his conscience. 
He had never hardened into strength 
the tissues of his soul. Desire rather 
than duty mastered him in more than 
one crisis of his life. 

When we look out upon the mod- 
ern world we see a great group of 
men who are slaves of their own de- 
sires. They have never learned to 
do without a thing which they want. 
Impulse, and not principle, holds the 
rudder of their lives. Outstanding in 
this group is the man of wine. Stim- 
ulus and sensation are the two things 
which he is seeking in life. When he 
is dull and heavy he turns to intox- 
icants for their bracing and invigor- 
ating effect. He does not think of re- 
action afterward. If he is a poet he 
finds his rhymes in the wine cup. He 
fails to see what nobler sources of 
inspiration he is missing. If he is an 
orator his eloquence was held in a 
bottle before he quaffed its contents 
and set free an army of leaping words. 
He does not see how poor and paltry 
and artificial such eloquence is. If 
dark and passionate desires mane 
themselves articulate it is a glass of 
the drink which rules his life which 
enables him to stifle the qualms of 
conscience and go forth to the indul- 
gences from which his better nature 
would draw back. Wine gives men a 
forged check to poetry, to eloquence, 
to enjoyment, to Indulgence. All that 
it gives Is artificial and unreal and 
the taste of It turns to gall and bit- 
terness at last. 



The Man of God 

Whittier's regretful "It might have 
been" has echoed with sad rnythni 
through many a heart. One can draw 
a vivid mental picture of what the 
life of Samson might have been if he 
had developed in moral power as he 
did develop in physical strength. Up- 
on such a man a nation might have 
leaned. In him it might have found 
complete deliverance. The tragic 
death of Samson was really brought 
upon him by his own lack ot self-eon- 
trol, and the Samson who might have 
been would not have passed out of 
life by one last spasm of strength 
after such wreched weakness. He 
would have been wise in council, far- 
sighted in planning for battle, brave 
in the hour of fighting and steady in 
the hour of victory. Under his len 
ership the consolidation of the nation 
would have gone forward rapidly. As 
it was, his career was that of a sort 
of glorified village bully. As it might 
have been, his career would have been 
that of a noble judge. Samson is one 
of the great failures of the Bible. He 
was meant to be a man of God. He 
only succeeded in being a man who 
could not hold his tongue. — Lynr 
Hough, D. D., in N. Y. Christian Ad- 
vocate. 



Positive proof from oldest Records 
that John baptized by Sprinkling. 68- 
page book, only 16 cents in stamps. 
Mahaffey Co., Box 12, Batesburg, S. C. 



Fruit All the Year 

Get a few early Peaches, some mid- 
season Apples, Pears, Peaches, Plums, 
Grapes, then some winter Apples and 
Pecans, and you can have fresh fruit 
the year round. "Bat all you can, and 
can all you can't." 

Our catalog gives full information as 
to varieties. Prices always reasonable. 

Tell us your tree wants. We have 
them ready for you. Also Roses, 
Flowering Shrubs and other ornamen- 
tals. Immediate shipment if desired. 
Place order promptly. 

HOWARD NURSERY CO., 
Box J210 Stovall, N. C. 



GARTSIDB'S IRON RUST SOAP CO., 
4054 Lancaster Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Gartside's Iron Soap (U. S. registered 
patent No. 3477) removes iron rust, ink 
and all unwashable stains from cloth- 
ing, marble, etc., with magical effect. 
Good seller, big margins. House-to- 
house agents and store salesman want- 
ed. The original, 25c a tube. Beware 
of infringements and the penalty for 
making, selling and using an infringed 
article. Suitable for church fairs. 



THIS BEAUTIFUL fcBOOK FREE 

"Simple Plantings for Southern 
Homes" — a handsome little book that 
shows just how to arrange trees, shrub- 
bery, vines, etc., to get the most beauti- 
ful effects. This book shows what won- 
derful improvements can be made in 
the appearance of the home grounds by 
a judicious selection and arrangement 
of ornamentals, and at little expense. A 
number of plans are fully described and 
illustrated with photographs. The book 
is being distributed free by the J. Van. 
Lindley Nursery Co., Box F. 203, Po- 
mona, N. C. Write them for a copy, and 
for their catalogue, which contains full 
information and instruction on setting 
out, growing and caring for trees and 
plants. ** 




/^^^^/f^ Standard 

Memorial 



Windows 

Made in High Point 

Beautiful In design- 
Strong In construction. 
Largost and oldest glass 
plant in tlie South. Capac- 
ity for any and all orders 
and prompt delivery. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. Refer- 
ences—any of our old 
customers or any bank or 
banker in High Point. 
Write for catalog. 

Standard Mirror Co. 
High Point, N. C. 



K 



BEAUTIFUL 
FLORAL 
DESIGNS t 

Furnished on short notice 




Summit Avenue Greenhouses 



HOWARD GARDNER 



Proprietor 



GREENSBORO, 



N. C. 



Office Phone 571 Res. Phone 1345 



DR. C. W. MOSELEY 

DISEASES OP 
STOMACH AND INTESTINES 



121% So. Elm St., Greensboro, N. C. 



The Newest Styles of Jeweh 

WATCHES, STERLING SILVER 
AND PLATE WARE 

Clocks that will run and a large assei 
ment of Fine Pocket Books, Cut QIat 
ware and Ornaments. We are the old< 
leading firm in the city. Everything gua 
anteed. 

SCHIFFMAN JEWELRY CO 

LEADING JEWELERS 




0: 



f.-.'.> 

!•( 
I* 

ij*'*'. 



Strength is what 
paint is for. The 
stronger it is, the 
less gallons and 
money it takes, 
and the longer it 
wears. The strong- 
est paint-word is 
DEVOE. 

ODELL 

Hardware Co. 



January 28, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Thirteen 



Our Little Folks' Department 




I like to get up in the morning 

And begin a brand new day. 
There are so many things to happen 

And so many things to play! 
I think I like the best of all 

The time just after tea, 
When mother takes the fairy book 

And reads to Ted and me. 

— Exchange. 



JAPANESE CHILDREN 

Far away, far away 
Are the little brown Japanese children 
at play 

In dresses so long and so loose and so 
bright, 

With queer little shoes and hair like 

the night- 
Far away, so far away. 
Now, what do think these little folk 

play? 

They chase the soft petals when bright 

blossoms fall, 
And they love the white cherry bloom 

best of them all. 



MARY'S LITTLE GUEST 

"Here's something for you, Mary," 

Teddy Briscoe held out a pasteboard 
box with holes cut in the lid, which 
was securely tied on. 

"O, what is it?" cried Mary, a little 
breathlessly. 

"Something alive," grinned Teddy. 

"Will it hurt me?" Mary asked, half 
afraid to take the box. 

"No, siree! What would I bring any- 
thing to hurt you for? Take it!" And 
Teddy shoved the box into her arms. 
Teddy shoved the box into her hands. 

There was a frightened flutter inside, 
Mary nearly dropped it. Then came 
an inquiring chirp and another flutter. 
"O, I know! It's a bird! It's a bird!" 
she sang as she hopped gleefully about 
on her well foot, hugging the box to 
her. 

"Be careful, or you'll drop him and 
he'll get away. He can fly like any- 
thing." 

Teddy thrust his hands into his 
pockets, stood with his feet wide apart 
and tried to look like Mr. Jackson 
when he was feeling very important. 

"What kind is it?" asked Mary as she 
peeped under the lid, trying to see. 

"It's a goldfinch, and he can sing. 
He must be an old one, for he was 
awfully hard to catch," answered Ted- 
dy. 

"I wish I could see it," exclaimed 
Mary as she raised the lid a triflle high- 
er in her efforts to see into the box. 

Teddy banged it down in such a hur- 
ry that he nearly pinched her little 
freckled nose. "You'll let him out 
:~et," he exclaimed impatiently. "Have 
you got a cage?" he asked. 

"No ; but Miss Spinney has an empty 
one. Maybe she'd lend it to us. I'll 
go and see." 

And she limped away to Miss Spin- 
ney's pretty new cottage. She soon re- 
turned with the prettiest cage, all gilt 
and white wires, into which Teddy help- 
ed her put the frightened little bird. 

"Thank you ever so much, Teddy," 
said Mary when it was all done. 
. "You're welcome. Besure you feed 
him and give him fresh water every 
day." 

And Teddy started home. 

Every day Mary put food into the 
cage, the very choicest bits she could 
find; but the goldfinsh refused to eat 
or to sing. Generally he sat with 
drooping wings, looking longingly out 
at the trees. Sometimes he fluttered 
and beat his little wings helplessly 
against the wires of his prison. 

Mary was troubled. She knew how 
it felt not to be able to run and jump 
like other children, for she was a 
cripple. One day she sat and watch- 
ed the bird a long time and tried to 
coax him to eat, but he would not. 
Then she picked up the cage and slow- 
ly opened the door. 



Soon the goldfinch saw that he could 
get out and fluttered up into a nearby 
tree, looking so glad and surprised. 
Then he sang his sweetest song to 
thank Mary for his freedom and flew 
away. 

Mary sighed a little. "I wish he had 
wanted to stay; but I am glad he has 
gone home, anyway," she said as she 
trudged back to Miss Spinney's with 
the empty cage. — Selected. 



BABIES IN THE SNOW 

"And you want me to tell you a new 
story?" 

"Yes, Uncle Charles," answered Do- 
rothy; "I want you to tell me a story 
that I have never, never heard before.' 

Uncle Charles looked quite thought- 
ful for a little while, and then asked: 
"Have you ever heard about Cinderella 
and the wee bit of a glass slipper that 
she wore on her wee bit of a foot?" 

"Just lots of times, Uncle Charles.' 

"Well, then, have you ever heard the 
story called 'Babes in the Wood'?" 

"Just lots of times," again answered 
Dorothy. 

Uncle Charles put on his "thinking 
cap" again and presently said: "I 
have it! I shall tell you about 'Babies 
in the Snow.' In Lapland the babies 
sleep in the snow while their papas 
and mammas attend church." 

"Wait just a minute, Uncle Charles, 
interrupted Dorothy. "Is Lapland in 
the United States of America?" 

This question made Dorothy's broth- 
er Tommy smile and look very wise. 
You see, he had been to school and had 
studied geography. 

"No, Dorothy," answered Uncle 
Charles, "Lapland is not in the United 
States. It is in a European country, 
and it is a very cold country. The 
winters in Lapland are long, and the 
Lapps go about in sleds drawn by rein- 
deer. The reindeer is by far the most 
valuable domestic animal of Lapland. 
Cold weather does not keep the Lapps, 
from attending their places of worship, 
for they are a religious people. The 
missionaries who go among them to 
teach them about Jesus always have 
large and attentive audiences. When 
the reindeer come to a standstill, just 
outside of the church, Papa Lapp gets 
out of the sled, selects a good place for 
a bed, and then digs a bed right down 
in the snow. When the snow bed is 
ready, Mamma Lapp hands him Baby 
Lapp, all wrapped in skins as snugly as 
can be, and he puts him carefully in 
the snow bed he prepared for him. 
Then Papa Lapp piles snow around 
Baby Lapp until he is as snug as a bug 
in a rug. The baby thus put away in 
the snow bed, Papa Lapp then secures 
the reindeer, and he and Mamma Lapp 
walk solemnly into church." 

"Sakes alive!" said Dorothy. "Un- 
cle Charles, does the baby stay out in 
the snow bed all the time' his mamma 
and papa are listening to the preach- 
er?" 

"Yes, Dorothy, the whole time," Uu- 
cle Charles replied. "All Lapp babies 
are thus left outside, buried in the 
snow. We are told that a Lapp baby 
in a snow bed is every bit as comfort- 
able as he would be if he were tucked 
snugly in an eiderdown bed." 

" 'Babes in the Snow' is an all-right 
story," declared Dorothy when Uncle 
Charles had finished. "I shall," said 
she, "tell it to Flossie when she comes 
to play with me tomorrow." — Miss D. 
V. Farley. 



QUEEN BESS AND THE FAWN 

"What in the world have you got 
there?" asked Jack's mother as the 
boy drove into the farmyard. 

For answer Jack lifted something 
from the bottom of the wagon and plac- 
ed it on the ground, where it stood on 
its long, slender legs, looking timidly 
about. 



"Why," said Mrs. Crafts, "it's a 
young fawn! Where did you get it?" 

"Some one shot its mother in the 
woods, and the little thing hung about, 
and so the hunters brought it along 
into the village with them. They want- 
ed to give it away, and I took it. I 
thought it would make a nice pet." 

"O Jack! What will you do with it? 
It isn't old enough to feed." 

Jack whistled. "I had not thought 
of that, mother." Then after a mo- 
ment's thought: "Why not fix up a 
nursing bottle for it?" 

"Well, you might try it; but I doubt 
if you can make the little thing use it." 

Sut, strange to say, the little fawn 
took to the nursing bottle at once. It 
seemed very hungry, and the bottle was 
refilled several times before its hunger 
was appeased. They made a bed for it 
at night on some straw in the stable. 

Jack's new pet grew very fast indeed 
and learned to follow him about like a 
dog. 

When the summer came they put it 
in the pasture with the cows during the 
daytime, and soon a warm friendship 
sprang up between .one of the cows 
called "Queen Bess" and the fawn. 

Queen Bess had recently had a calf 
taken from her, and she adopted the 
fawn in its place. She would lick its 
face and body to keep it clean, and if 
it strayed far from her she would call 
to it frantically until it came running 
up to her. 

By and by as the fawn grew older it 
would often leap the pasture fence and 
run out into the road. Sometimes it 
would go as far as the village. It was 
afraid of no one, and often, if it met a 
person whom it knew, it would run up 
to him and push its nose against his 
hand, which meant it wanted to be 
caressed. 

Often it would follow Jack in his 
walks through the fields or woods. But 
Jack did not like to have his pet wan- 
der outside the pasture alone, for fear 
that some one who did not know she 
was a tame deer might shoot her. 

After giving much thought to the 
matter be decided to put a tall wire 
netting around a clump of evergreen 
trees in the pasture and keep the fawn 
there through the daytime. He made 
a little gate in the netting for her to go 
through. 

Every night at milking time the 
fawn was let out. Then it would gal- 
lop straight to the farmyard, where 
Queen Bess was waiting to be milked. 
The cow would always greet it foundly 
and caress it with her tongue. Then 
they would go to the tie-up, where 
they would lie side by side thurogh 
the night.— Rose D. Nealley. 



A WESTERN PLOWMAN 

In all the States east of the Missis- 
sippi River there are millions of tiny 
plowmen always at work helping pre- 
pare the soil for the farmers to plant 
their crops. They are the angle-worms 
which we often find when digging in 
our gardens and which Brother Tom 
gathers when he is going on a fishing 
trip. Now, in most of the Western 
States earthworms are quite unknown. 
But the farmers in that region are not 
without assistants. The little Wes- 
tern plowmen are very different from 
the Eastern ones. They wear fur 
coats, have sharp teeth and claws, and 
each one owns a pair of good-sized 
pockets on each side of his mouth. 
These little fellows were christened, 
from their pouches, pocket gophers. 
They are cousins of the gray and red 
squirrils that scamper through our' 
woods. They are also called camas 
rats. 

Tunneling is the gopher's greatest 
delight. He uses his claws, like a pick 
ax, to loosen the earth ; and then, with 
his scooplike paws, he throws it be: 
hind him. When he has quite a pile 
he turns about and pushes the loose 
earth forward with his head until he 
has thrust it outside the entrance to 
his burrow. 

The gopher is a neat little fellow, 
and when his digging is done for the.. 



POCKET BIBLES 

For those who object to carrying 
large Bibles these Editions are 
Thin, Light and very Compact. 

AUTHORIZED VERSION, Clear 
Black Print, on the finest 
Thin Paper made. 
All with the Button Flap Binding 
whichgives an added advantage for 
slipping in and out of the pocket. 

The leather cover extends com- 
pletely over the front edge and ia 
fastened on top with a button 
clasp as shown on illustration. 

Each containing a complete series 
of Colored Maps. 




Size. 5Vi x 3\'i in. Self- Pronouncing Agate32mo 



N 



Specimen of Typt. 

OW when Jg'sus was born In 
Beth'16-hem of Ju-dse'A In the 



No. 1115F. French Seal, divinity circuit over- 
lapping covers, gold titles, silk head bands and silk 

marker, round corners, red gold edges. 
Publishers Price, $1.50. Our Price, Postpaid, $1.20 

Holman India Paper Pocket Text Bibles. 

Size. 3Vi x SVi inches. 'A of an inch in thickness. 

Weighs 7 Vz ounces. Same Type as 1115F above. 
No. 11] 5XF. French Seal, divinity circuitover- 
lapping covers, gold titles, silk head bands and 
silk marker, round corners, red gold edges. 
Publishers Price, S'2.40. Our Price, Postpaid, $1 .80 

No. 1130XF. Same a. No. 1115X with Extra 
Leather Linings. Publishers Price, $2.80. 

Our Price, Postpaid, $2.1 5 



POCKET REFERENCE BIBLES PRONOUNCING 

Old and New Testaments, Marginal References 
and Maps. Chapter headings on outside comer 
of each page making the Bible Self-Indexed, 



Specimen of Type 

19 'And the border of the CSA 
nian-ites was from Si'don, as thou 



Size, 4%x.6ri inches. Minion 16mo. 

No. 1410F. French Seal, divinity circuit over- 
lappingcovers, round corners, redgoldedges. 
Publishers Price, $2.00. Our Price, Postpaid, $l.bO 

Holman India Paper Pocket Reference Bibles. 
P.onounclng, References, &c, same type as 141 OF. 
Size, 4%x 6% inches. Minion 16mo. V» of an inch 
in thickness. Weighs 12 ounces. 

No. 1412XF. French Seal, divinity circuit over" 
lapping covers, head bands and marker, round 
corners, red gold edges. Publishers Price, . „ 
$2.50. Our Price, Postpaid, $2.10 

No. 1430XF. Same aa No. 1412XF with Extra 
Leather Linings. Publishers Price, $3.00 .„ ■ ■■ 
Our Price, Postpaid, $2.50 

Address CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, 

Greensboro, N. C. 



Churrhesl 
Sundayl 

School^ _ 

Christian Finance .Association, 80 Maiden Lane.NewYork. 



SAVE YOUR MEAT 
— From Skippers— 

USE CHAMBERS AKTI-SKIPPER COMPOUND 

One package is guaranteed to keep skippers 
and other insects from Five Hundred Pounds 
of Cured Meat. Keeps meat clean and sweet. 
Price 50c. per package, by mail, postpaid. 
CHAMBERS-GODFREY MFG. CO. M.rtin. Tenn. 




day he sits up and combs and washes 
his coat with tongue and claws. He 
loves grain, and his recreation after a 
hard day's labor is to visit a cornfield 
and cram his pockets with the sweet 
kernels. 

Some farmers say the gophers injure 
their crops by covering large portions 
of the fields with their earth mounds 
and gnawing the roots of trees that 
they come across in their burrowing. 
Other farmers say- that their crops 
grow a great deal better after the: lit- 
tle plowmen have worked over their 
fields and that they are glad of their 
assistance. 

Though the gopher is a great work- 
er, he likes now and then to take a 
little nap. When he is ready he care- 
fully plugs up the door of his tunnel 
with firmly packed earth. Who knows 
but a weasel might creep in and seize 
him, or a badger spring upon him, be- 
fore he even got his eyes open. "Best 
to be on the safe side," he says to 
himself, "even if it is more trouble. ' 
— Margaret W. Leighton. 



THE BABY AND ITS SWING 

A circus was passing through a coun- 
try town recently, in which were sever- 
al elephants. The people stood watch- 
ing the procession when a little baby, 
just able to walk, toddled out into the 
road directly in front of the elephants. 
Everybody stood expecting to see the 
baby crushed by the big feet of the 
elephant. The leader of the herd pick- 
ed the baby up with his trunk and 
swung it out of danger, depositing it 
on the side of the road, none the worse, 
for itjsr remarkable ride in the trunk of 
an elephant. — Exchange. 



Page Fourteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 28, 19 



TRINITY COLLEGE NOTES 

The local Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation recently began a movement 
in the community to secure funds from 
its membership to erect for the use of 
its representatives to the Annual Bi- 
ble Conference a cottage on the Blue 
Ridge Association Grounds. The wo- 
men students here agreed to join their 
effort with the efforts of the Y. M. U 
A., and are assisting in securing the 
necessary funds so that their repre- 
sentatives to the annual meeting of 
the Y. W. C. A. may also have the use 
of the house. It is said that it was 
largely through the enthusiasm of the 
women students here tor the plan thai 
the agreement was nnaily reached to 
build the cottage. 

At a recent meeting of the Colum- 
bian Literary Society, the following of- 
ficers were elected: P. G. Farrar, 
president; J. S. Cox, vice-president; 
L. C. Allen, secretary, and W. P. Haw- 
field, marshall. 

Porfessor E. C. Brooks went to 
ureenville last Saturday where he de- 
livered an address before the Pitt 
County Teachers' Association. 

President William P. Few has re- 
turned from Nashville, where he at- 
tended the meeting of a committee on 
textbooks and literature of the Sun- 
day School Board of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. 

Dr. William H. Glasson, of the de- 
partment of economics and politics, 
is the contributor of two important 
articles in the "Cyclopedia of American 
Government," a work published re- 
cently under the editorship of Pro- 
fessors Albert Bushnell Hart, of Har- 
vard, and A. C. Laughlin, of the Uni- 
versity of Chicago. The principal ar- 
ticle by Dr. Glasson is on "Military 
and Naval Pensions in the United 
States," and a shorter article by him 
is on "Confederate Pensions." 



SIGN YOUR NAME HERE 

If you suffer with any chronic dis- 
ease that does not seem to be benefited 
by drugs, such as dyspepsia, indiges- 
tion,' sick headache, neuralgia, rheu- 
matism, gall stones, liver or kidney j 
diseases, or any other chronic ailment 
involving impure blood, you are cor- 
dially invited to accept the liberal of- 1 
fer made below. It is a grave mistake 
to assume that your case is incurable 
simply because remedies prepared by 
human skill have not seemed to ben- 
efit you. Put your faith in nature, ac- 
cept this offer and you will never have 
cause to regret it. 

I believe this is the most wonder- 
ful Mineral Spring that has ever been 
discovered, for its waters have either 
restored or benefited every one who 
has accepted my offer. Match your 
faith in this Spring against my pocket- 
book and if the water does not relieve 
your case I will make no Charge for it. 
Clip this notice, sign your name, en- 
close .the amount and let this wonder- 
ful water begin its healing work in 
you as it has in thousands of others. 
Shivar Spring, 

Box 5A, Shelton, S. C. 
Gentlemen: 

I accept your guarantee offer and en- 
close herewith two dollars for ten gal- 
lons of Shivar Mineral Water. I agree 
to give it a fair trial, in accordance 
with instructions contained in booklet 
you will send, and if it fails to benefit 
my case you agree to refund the price 
In full upon receipt of the two empty 
demijohns which I agree to return 
promptly. 

Name 

Address 

Shipping Point 

(Please write distinctly.) 
Note: — The Advertising Manager of the 
North Carolina Christian Advocate Is per- 
sonally acquainted with Mr. Shivar. You 
run no rlek whatever in accepting his of- 
fer. I have personally witnessed the re- 
markable curative power of this Water In 
a very serious case. 



The Christian Advocate Offers You 

This Well Known Bible Dictionary 

SEE SPECIAL OFFER BELOW 

Realizing the wide demand that exists among our constituents for this Bible Dictionary, we have 
made a special arrangement with the publishers of the work by which they agreed to supply it to 
Have your friends take advan- ^-**£gS 9 ) us on exceptional terms, provided we 

tage of this special offer ^f^V^^W^ would widely advertise it, and this 

as well as ^^-ggjp ' " "JSm- m| enables us to offer this well-known 

yourself ^ggtt^0 .<-tiflflLfll '-*"- < ' Bible Dictionary in its original form 

and with all its important features, 
including over 400 illustrations and 
maps in colors, at less than half the 
regular price. 

THE FATHER OF ALL BIBLE 
DICTIONARIES 

Everyone acknowledges the superior 
value of Dr. William Smith's Bible Dic- 
tionary, ascontaining thefruitof theripest 
Biblical scholarship. It is practically the 
foundation, or father, of all other Bible 
Dictionaries. This late edition is brought 
down to the twentieth century and thor- 
oughly revised to incorporate modern re- 
search and discoveries in Bible lands. It 
has been adapted in its presentform to the 
convenience of teachers and scholars. 

MAKES BIBLE STUDY EASY. 
MAKES THE BIBLE PLAIN 
TO EVERY READER 

This Bible Dictionary is a veritable 
treasureto Christian Workers. Itcontains 
in the simplest language a full explanation 
of all topics mentioned in the Bible— every 
place, nation, tribe, person, and historical 
event ; every custom and rite ; every instru- 
ment and implement ; every animal, plant , 
flower, mineral, metal, etc. It is a system- 
atic collation of all the facts recorded in 
the Bible, supplemented and explained by 
materials supplied from authentic records 
of Biblical times. It gives in compact and 
lucid form the substance of the result of 
profound Biblical scholarship and research. 
IT OPENS A NEW UNDERSTAND- 
ING AND APPRECIATION OF THE 
BIBLE IN A WAY THAT NO OTHER 
BOOK DOES. 




This is a reduced 
photograph of the 
complete book 
which is 5f x 7| inches in size 
and contains 834 pages, 440 
illustrations and 16 maps 
printed in colors. Bound in 
Cloth, gold and ink stamping 



Our Special Offer 

From this till March first 
we offer the Advocate one 
year and this dictionary for 

$2.50 

This applies to new subscrib- 
ers and renewals. 




^<taress.CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, GREENSBORO, N. C. 



THE CELEBRATED 

Throneburg Nursery 

solicits your trade on apple, 
peach, pear, shade and orna- 
mental trees. Prices reasonable. 
Agents wanted everywhere. Liberal commis- 
sions, the THRONEBURG NURSERY, NEWTON, N. C. 



THIS SPACE BELONGS T© 

ROBT. W.MURRAY 

GENERAL 

INSURANCE 

Or«en3b«ro, North Carolisn 

308 1/ 2 South Elai St. 
Phene 168 



B 

WrIUl 



^ mm OTBZS BILLS 
/gHVlWUTEI, MOM DOa- 

'MM*Lti2 L Loira pbici. 
e tffl ft t ora ritt oataloocb 
XIXjXjJS. ^ TILLS WHT. 



LYMYER 

CHURCH 

rite to Cincinnati Bell Foundry Co.. Cincinnati, 0. 



MILLER, ROBINS I WEILL 

(foaaral Insurance 

General Agents Fidelity and 
Deposit Company of Maryland 
108 North Kim Straat 'Phene 44 



Carolina & Northwestern Rwy, Co*. 

Schedule Effective October 18th, 1914 



Northbound 


NO. 10 
Passenger 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 8 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 6 
Passenger 
Sun. Only 


NO. 50 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 62 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


Chester Lv. 


7 50 a m 
1 36 

9 21! 
9 10 
10-28 

11 06 

12 05 p m 

1 08 

2 00X 
4 09 
4 85 








4 15pm 
6 88 
8 20 


YorkvlUe " 








Gagtenia " 








Gastonia " 


4 30pm 

5 40 

6 44 

7 80 

8 60 






Lin coin ton i " 
















Hiokory ' • 

Lenoir ' 1 


12 05 p m 
1 08 


6 45 a m 
8 07 










Mortimer 1 ' 




















Southbound 


NO. 9 
Passenger 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 7 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 5 
Passenger 
Sun. Only 


NO. 61 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 63 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


Hdgemont tir '. 


9 00am 
9 10 
11 20! 

1 85 pm 

2 36 
8 05 
8 43 
4 80 

6 05x 
6 64 
6 40 












" 7 OOa'm" 

8 16 

9 00 
9 51 

11 28 




1 l5"p m 
8 20 






~8"l5 a£ 
9 12 


Hickory " 








Lincoln ton " 
















Gastonia ' ' 






11 60 a m 
1 24 

8 10 p m 


Yorkville '.' 

























x Leave 



CONNECTIONS 



! Arrive 



CHESTER— Southern Railway, S. A. L. and L. & C. 
YORKVILLE— Sou'hern Railway LINCOLNTON— S. A. L. 

GASTONIA— Southern Railway, Piedmont* Northern Railway 
NEWTON and HICKORY— Southern Railway 



E. F. REID. G. P. Agt. 



CHESTER, S. C. 



January 28, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Fifteen 



• • V 

:J Quarterly Meetings j| 



ASHEVILLE DISTRICT— C. A. W»od, 
Presiding Elder, Weavervllle, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Fairview, Tweeds 23-24 

North Asheville, night M 

Walnut, Jewel H1H 30-31 

Hot Sp'gs and Marshall, Marshall, nij;hT: 31 

February 

Sulphur Springs, Laurel Hill 6-7 

West Asheville, night 7 

Swannanoa, Swannanoa 13-14 

Black Mountain, night 14 

Weavervllle Ct., Flint Hill 20-21 

Bethei-, night 21 



CHARLOTTE DISTRICT— J. C. Rowe, 
Presiding Elder, Charlotte, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Morven, Bethel 24- 25 

Wadesboro, Wadesboro, night IS 

Polkton, Peachland '...JO 

Lllesville, Lilesville 21 

February 

Ansonville, Ansonvllle 6-7 

Waxhaw, Waxhaw 12-14 

Spencer Memorial 21 



GREENSBORO DISTRICT— J. H. Weav- 
er, Presiding Elder, Greensboro, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Randleman and Naomi, St. Paul ..23-24 

Asheboro 24-25 

Uwharrie Ct., Concord 36-11 

Denton Ct., Denten Sl-1 

February 

Deep River, Cedar Falls 6-7 

West Market 13-14 



MT. AIRY DISTRICT— H. C. Sprinkle, 
Presiding Elder, Mt. Airy, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Tadkinville, Prospect 28-24 

Blkin, night 2»-»l 

Jonesvllle 30-81 

February 

Dobson, Stony Knoll 6-7 

Pilot Mountain, Pilot Mountain 18-14 

Ararat, Chestnut Grove 26-21 

Mt. Airy Ct., Zion 27-28 



NORTH WILKESBORO DISTRICT— J. H. 
Bennett, Presiding Elder, North 
Wllkesboro, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Watauga, Henson's Chapel 23-24 

Elk Park, Elk Park 30-31 

February 

Avery, Fairview 6-7 

Boone, Rutherwood 13-14 

Laurel Springs, Transon 20-21 

Sparta, Potato Creek 27-28 

Revival Meetings 

January 

Creston, Creston 14-21 

February 

Avery, Fairview 2-11 

Laurel Springs, Transon 16-23 



SALISBURY DISTRICT— W. R. Ware, 
Presiding Elder, Salisbury, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Bethel and Love's Chapel, Bethel ..23-24 

Concord, Westford, night 24 

Gold Hill Ct., Gold Hill 30-31 

New London Ct., New London 30-febl 



STATESVILLE DISTRICT— L. T. Mann, 
Presiding Elder, Statesvllle, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Hickory Ct., Marvin, 11 a. m 28-24 

Catawba Ct., Catawba, night 24-25 

Statesvllle Ct., N. S'ville, 11 a. m., 30-31 
Broad St., Broad St., night 31-Feb. 1 

February 

Mt. Zion and Huntersville, Mt. Zion, 

11 a. m 6-7 

Davidson, Davidson, night ...... 7-8 

Mooresville Ct., Fair View, 11 a. m., 13-14 
-Mooresville Sta., Mooresville, night, 14-15 
Cool Spring Ct., Cool Spg., 11 a. m., 20-21 
Troutman Ct., Shepherds, 11 a. m., 27-28 



SHELBY DISTRICT— J. R. Scroggs. Pre- 
siding Elder, Shelby, N. C 
First Round 

January 

Crouse, Crouse 23 

Stanly, Stanly 24-25 

Shelby Ct., Sharon SO 

Second Round 

February 

Dallas and Ozark, Dallas 6 

West End, Franklin Avenue 6 

Gastonla, Main Street 7-8 

Lowesville, Snow Hill 13-14 

Mt. Holly, Mt. Island 14-15 

Bessemer, Concord 20-21 

King's Mountain, King's Mountain 21 

Belwood, Kadish 27-28 

March 

Polkville, Polkville 6-7 



Lowell, Lowell 13-14 

McAdenville, McAdenvllle 14 

Rock Spring, Mt. Pleasant 20-21 



MORGANTON DISTRICT— J. E. Gay, 
Presiding Elder, Marlon, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Cliffside, Cllffsldo 23-24 

MorganUn Ct., Salem 30-31 

Connelly Springs, Rutherford College, 

31-Feb.l 
February 

Spruce Pine and Bakersvllle, Spruce 

Pine 5-7 

Micaville, South Toe 6-7 

Bald Creek, Bald Creek 13-14 

Burnsville 14-15 

Marion Ct., Green Mountain 20-21 



WAYN ESVILLK DISTRICT— L. T. Cor- 
dell, Presiding Elder, Asheville, N. C, 
R. F. D. No. 2 
First Round 

January 

Hayesville Ct., Oak Forest 23-24 

Murphy Ct., Tomotla 27-28 

Ranger Ct., Salem 29-30 

Murphy Station 31 

February 

Judson Ct., Maple Springs 2-3 

Robbinsville Ct., Robblnsville 4-5 

Andrews Station 6-7 

Macon Ct., Union 13-14 

Franklin Ct., Balem 16-17 

Highlands Ct., Highlands 18-19 

Franklin Station 21-22 



WINSTON DISTRICT— H. K. Boyer, 
Presiding Elder, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Davie, Oak Grove 23-24 

Cooleemee, night 24 

Lewlsville, Sharon 30-81 

February 

Kernersville, Kernersvllle 6-7 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 
N. B. — Following schedule figures are 

published only as information and are 
net guaranteed. 

12:15 a. m. — No 32 dally Southern's 
Southeastern Limited. Pullman drawing- 
roem, epen section sleeping cars Jack- 
sonville and Augusta to New York. Din- 
ing car service. , Day coaches. 

12:36 a. m. — No. 112, daily, local for 
Raleigh, Selma. and Goldsboro. Pullman 
sleeping car Winston- Salem to Raleigh 
which is open at 9:30 and may be occu- 
pied in Raleigh until 7 a. m. 

1:42 a. m. — No. 30, dally, Birmingham 
Special. Pullman drawing-room and ob- 
servation sleeping cars Birmingham and 
Celumbus to New York, and Birmingham 
to Richmond. Dining car service. Day 
coaches. 

1:50 a. m. — No. 29 daily, Birmingham 
Special. Pullman drawing-room and ob- 
servation sleeping cars New York and 
Richmond to Birmingham and Columbus. 
Dally tourist car Washington to San 
Francisco via popular Sunset Route. Din- 
ing cars. Coaches. 

3:15 a. m.— No. 31 daily, The Southern's 
Southeastern Limited. Pullman drawing- 
room and open section sleeping cars New 
York to Jacksonville and Augusta. Din- 
ing car service. Day coaches. 

3:45 a. m.— No. 45 daily, local for Char- 
lotte, connecting for Atlanta and points 
south. 

7:10 a. m. — No. 8 daily, local for Rich- 
mond. 

7:16 a. m.— No. 87 daily. New York, At- 
lanta and New Orleans Limited. Solid 
Pullman train with observation and open 
section sleeping cars New York to New 
Orleans, and New York to Asheville, and 
Macon. Pullman parlor car Greensboro 
to Montgomery. Club car Washington to 
Montgomery. Dining car service. 

7:30 a. m— No. 168 daily, local for Ral- 
eigh, Selma, and Goldsboro. 

7:40 a. m. — No. 164 daily, except Sunday 
for Ramseur. 

7:26 a. m. — No. 11, daily, local for At- 
lanta, Pullman sleeping cars Norfolk and 
Richmond to Charotte. Day coaches. 

8:16 a. m.— No. 237, daily, for Winston- 
Salem and North Wllkesboro. Pullman 
sleeping car Raleigh to Winston-Salem. 

8:20 a. m.— No. 138, daily, local for Mt. 
Airy. 

9:30 a. m.— No. 44, daily, for Washing- 
ton and polnta north. 

9:46 a. m.— No. 144, dally, Raleigh, Sel- 
ma and Goldsboro Pullman sleeping car 
Atlanta to Raleigh. 

12:36 p. m.— No. 21, dally, for Asheville 
and Waynesvllle, connecting at Asheville 
with Carolina Special for all points west. 
Chair car Goldsboro to Asheville. ■ 

12:65 p. m.— No. 180, daily, local for San- 
ford, Fayetteville and Wilmington. 

1:30 p. m. — No. 7, dally, local for Char- 
lotte, connecting for Seneca and Colum- 
bia. 

1:30 p. m.— No. 36, daily U. S. Fast Mail 
for Washington, New York and points 
north. Pullman sleeping cars New Or- 
leans and Birmingham to New York. Din- 
ing car service. Day coaches. 

2:00 p. m. — No. 207, dally, for Winston- 
Salem, connecting dally except Sunday for 
North Wllkesboro. 

2:30 p. m. — No. 151, dally, except Sun- 
day for Madison. 

3:30 p. m. — No. 230, dally, except Sun- 
day for Ramseur. 

4:15 p. m.— No. 22, dally, for Raleigh, 
Selma and Goldsboro. Chair car. 

5:05 p. m.— No. 131, daily, for Mt. Airy. 

6:25 p. m.— No. 36, dally, U. S. Fast 
Mail, for Atlanta, New Orleans and Bir- 
mingham. Pullman sleeping cars New 
York to New Orleans and Birmingham. 
Dining car service. Day coaches. 



TRINITY COLLEGE 

FOUNDED 1838 : ; ; ; CHARTERED 1859 

A Southern institution of established national reputation. Classical and scientific courses 
leading to the bachelor's degree. Graduate courses in all departments. Schools of Engineer- 
ing, Education and Law. . 

Large endowment fund makes possible complete^ first- 
class equipment; full faculty of able, well-chosen instruc- 
tors; beautiful campus, new buildings, modern labora- 
tories, splendid library. Comfortable, inexpensive dormi- 
tories. For catalogue and illustrated booklet, address 

R. L. Flowers, Sec. to the Corporation, Durham, N. C. 




CABBAGE PLANTS gm 



Early 
^Jersey Wakefield 



GROWN FROM EXPENSIVE SEED 

I pay from three to five times as much for Peter 
Henderson & Co.'s seed as other planters pay fi r 
ordinary seed. Actual figures, $3.50 per lb. for 



Charleston Large 
Typo Wakefield 



Wakeflelds, $4.00 per lb. for Flat Dutch, against 75c. per lb, for ordinary seed. 
I My customers get the benefit in 

PERFECT PLANTS AT NO EXTRA COST 

Why not plant cabbage grown from high-grade seed and raise a successful crop, 
rather than use plants from inferior seed and be disappointed in the results? It 
costs no more. 

If l am out of the variety you want I will tell vou. I NEVER SUBSTITUTE EX- 
| CEPT WHEN REQUESTED BY THE PURCHASER. • 

Prices by Express: 1,000 to 4,000, $1.50 per 1,000; 5,000 to 9.000, $1.25 per 1,000; 10,000 or 
over $1,00 per 1,000. 

Varieties: Early Jersey Wakefield, Charleston 
Wakefield, Henderson's Succession, Flat Dutch, 
All Frost Proof. Order early to be sure of the 
variety you want. 

2,000 bushels Harrison's Selected Seed Corn, 
$2.00 per bushe F. O. B. Charleston, S. C. 



Succession 



H JOS. M.HARRISON 

I CHARLESTON. S.C. 




GREENSBORO NURSERIES 

AGENTS WANTED 

For Fruit, Shade and Ornamental Trees, Vines and Plants. 

JOHN A. YOUNG & SONS, Greensboro, N. C. ' 



Aff Exceptional Bible Offer 

Endorsed by Representatives of all denominations 

* THE 1911 BIBLE 

Being the old familiar Authorized Version, 
carefully amended by American scholars in 
the light of the latest modern scholarship. ' 

Not a Revision 

Only such passages as are recognized by all scholars 
as needlessly obscure have been altered in any way. 

Special Features 

A' New System of Chain References. 

A New System of Collected References. 
A New System of Paragraphs. 

" We believe, unqualifiedly, that the ion Bible is far the best trans- , 
lation ever given the English-speaking people, and the worthiest, 
of their confidence and affection."— T -Terald and Presbyter. 

Printed in large black-faced type, very easy to read 



Special Offers 



Fair $2.00 



we will send you, postpaid, a copy of this superb Bible, 
beautifully printed in large black-face type, and bound 
in the best French morocco, with overlapping edges, 
round corners, red under gold edges, headband, and fine silk marker. This Bible con- 
tains 12 beautifully colored Maps, and Index to Maps. 

Size, 8x5^ inches. 

H" - <g» ra afata^tt "' e v send you, postpaid, the exquisite Oxford India 

M$$§* %&<&*»K$%Jf Pa P er edition ol this Bible, which mea ures only % of an 
inch in thickness. It is bound in the finest Alaska seal, 
with overlapping edges, full leather lined to edge, silk sewed, round corners, red under 
gold edges, and has silk headband and marker. 

Size, 8x5% inches, % of an inch thick. 

Remember 1 1 These Bibles are published by the Oxford University Press, American 
Branch — in itself a sufficient guarantee of their excellence. 

Send for one of these Bibles to-day 

Address CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, Greensboro, N. C. 



6:35 p. m. — No. 236, dally, for Winston- 
Salem. 

7:15 p. m.— No. 132, dally local for 
Sanford. 

7:32 p. m. — No. 43, daily, for Alanta, 
and points south Sleeping, car Raleigh to 
Atlanta. 

10:15 p m. — No. 12, daily, local, for 
Richmond. ^Pullman sleeping cars Char- 
lotte to Richmond and Norfolk. 

10:20 p. m. — No. 233, daily, for Winston- 
Salem. 

11:29 p. m. — No. 38, dally. New York, 
Atlanta and New Orleans Limited. Solid 



Pullman train with observation and open 
section sleeping cars New Orleans, Macon 
and Asheville to New York. Dining car. 

E. H. COAPMAN, Vice-President and 
General Manager, Washington, D. C. 
S. H. HARD WICK, P. T. M., Washington 
D. C. 

H. F. CARY, G. P. A., Washington, D. C. 
R. H DeBUTTS, D. P. A., Charlotte, 
N. C. 

C. G. PICKARD, P. and T. A., Oreens- 
ber«, N. C. 

' . .■ ..•:.-•«.. l.j.,,.^..- '■ .> 5«5* 



Page Sixteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 28, 1915 



EX 



PUBLISHER'S MESSAGE 

A TALK ABOUT BUSINESS 

AND PLEA FOR CO-OPERATION 



One would suppose that it would just be a delight to 
the Methodist business man in Western North Carolina 
to patronize the North Carolina Christian Advocate. Both 
the Advertising and Job Printing departments should ap- 
peal to these men. We believe this will be the case when 
attention is persistently called to it. Notwithstanding we 
have had a good deal to say from time to time, it is still 
true that many of our people have not fully realized the 
value of the Advocate as 

An Advertising Medium 

If our merchants, manufacturers, farmers and business 
men generally could be induced to try it we have no 
doubt they would be amply repaid for money paid in ex- 
change for our advertising space. There ought to be a 
regular column filled with classified or want ads. and we 
hope to get our people who want anything or who have 
anything to sell to use the Advocate space and thus help 
their own business while helping to support an important 
institution of the church. For years a few of our enter- 
prising business men have appreciated the Advocate as an 
advertising medium, but the great majority of them need 
yet to have their attention called to this. While throwing 
away vast sums of money on various advertising schemes 
presented by the promoter, they let this really rich op- 
portunity go by unimproved. 

We have purged our columns of all advertising which 
can not be rated as first class and clean in every respect 
and this itself greatly enhances the value of our space. 

Again, there are hundreds of business men all over 
our section who have large quantities of printing done. 
They could turn much of this our way just as well, and 
many could turn all their job work into our house. 

We are Equipped 

for all kinds of job printing, especially pamphlets and 
commercial work, and this would help the Board of Publi- 
cation very much in its efforts to establish firmly the busi- 
ness and make a great paper for the Conference. The 
members of this Board give their time and thought to 
this business without charge or hope of remuneration — 
their work is a labor of love. They feel the more free to 
appeal to 

Methodist Business Men 

to think of our Advocate printing house in Greensboro 
when they need anything in that line, and if they can get 
what they want we feel sure they will take pleasure in 
turning patronage this way. Just think of it 

The Stationery of Our Country Stores 

would make a nice business for our Job Department and 
would well-nigh keep our presses busy ! ! 

Then think of the physicians, lawyers, preachers and 
other professional men who use printed stationery and! 
other printed matter, besides printing for the churches 
and church organizations. Of course we do not expect a 
monopoly of all this business, and we are already getting 
a goodly share ; but there are many who have never had 



their attention called specially to this, and with a little 
more thoughtfulness our business ought easily to be dou- 
bled, especially in the line of commercial work. It is 
evident that we need 

More Diligent Co-operation 

While any church business enterprise must depend 
mainly upon those who have charge, and cannot be 
allowed to depend upon such patronage as church loyalty 
alone would bring, it is nevertheless true that much de- 
pends upon that spirit of co-operation which church 
loyalty suggests and prompts. There are a few country 
merchants who have sent us their orders for stationery 
regularly since we began work in that line. They seem 
to be pleased, our business is benefited and we very 
greatly appreciate their spirit of co-operation. 

A large manufacturer in one of our thriving towns, 
after hearing the editor at a District Conference last 
year, frankly stated that he had not had his attention 
called to this before and that he had quite a good deal 
of work that, everything else being equal, he would be 
glad to turn our way. Since that time we have been 
getting nice orders occasionally, and if fifty or seventy- 
five more, who no doubt are in the same position, 
would do likewise, most of our problems would be 
solved, for the reason that this additional work would 
be handled without appreciable increase in our pay- 
roll. 

The Sale of Books 

For some two years or more we have been handling 
books in a small way. Most of this is purely a mail order 
business. We have arrangements with publishers to fill 
our orders, and allow us the trade discount; so, without 
paying any more for books our people can send their 
orders through us and thus add quite <t little item to 
our income. The only difference to the purchaser would 
be a delay of about one day. This applies to orders 
from Smith & Lamar, or any publishers in the United 
States. We hope to have the co-operation of our people 
in this respect also. We ought to co-operate in an ef- 
fort to put more good books into the hands of our peo- 
ple. Nothing is needed more today than the turning of 
the minds of our people into the channels of more 
serious and profitable thought. Good books will do this. 

Church Supplies 

Record books for Quarterly Conference, Church Con- 
ference, Sunday Schools, Baraca and Philathea Classes, 
etc., Bibles and Disciplines can be secured through us at 
the same prices charged by our Publishing House and 
other dealers. Why not turn the trade commission or 
discount into our own treasury? 

We take it that the Board need offer no apology for 
thus going into details in order to show our people of 
this opportunity for profitable and helpful co-operation. 

For further information write 

BOARD OF PUBLICATION, 

Greensboro, N. C. 



E3 



RcrlD Carolina 



(Man 




Advocate 



Volume LX 




Official Organ of tk Western Corth ©rolinaeonference 
metbodist episcopal Elnircft, Soutb 



Greensboro, N. C, Thvirsday, Fe^ y 4, 1915 



Number 5 





There is no time life the old time, 

When you and I were young, 
When the buds of April blossomed, 

And the birds of springtime sung. 
The garden's brightest glories 

By summer suns are nursed, 
But, oh, the sweet violets, 

The flowers that opened first! 

There is no place life the old place, 

Where you and I were born, 
Where we lifted first our eyelids, 

On the splendors of the morn, 
From the milfewhite breast that warmed us, 

From the clinging arms that bore, 
Where the dear eyes glistned o'er us 

That will lool^ f or us no rnore! 

There is no friend life the old friend, 

That has shared our morning days, 
No greeting life his welcome, 

No homage life his praise; 
Fame is the scentless sunflower, 

With gaudy crown of gold; 
But friendship is the breathing rose, 

With sweets in every fold. 

— Oliver Wendell Holmes 




Page Two 



i i ■ - i i - - - ~ 1 1 ! i i i ■•' ^_ • ' ^_ 

NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 4, 19: 



North Carolina Christian Advocate 



Entered at the Post Office at Greensboro 
mail matter of the second class 


N. 


C, as 


HUGH M. BLAIR 












Editor 


SUBSCRIPTION RATES 





Six Months 75 

To all preachers of the Gospel, per year 1.00 

Maka all remittances to 
Christian Advocate, ... - Greensboro, N. C. 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

It is not our custom to discontinue subscriptions 
when the time paid for expires, without notice. Sub- 
scribers who do not wish the paper continued should 
send notice to discontinue direct to the office. Oth- 
erwise they will be expected to pay for the paper 



A CASE IN POINT 

There is a timidity characteristic of pastors 
about pressing the circulation of the church pa- 
per. We fully appreciate this knowing by ex- 
perience the rebuffs that one meets. Neverthe- 
less, every pastor owes it to himself and to the 
people whom he serves to brace himself for the 
task and go about this work with confidence and 
without apology. We happen to have in hand 
this week a case which illustrates what we are 
writing about and we trust that we violate no 
rule of propriety in giving it to our readers. 

A short while ago we received a letter from 
the Lay Leader of Henrietta-Caroleen charge, 
lamenting the fact that few of their people were 
taking the Advocate. This man is an intelligent 
layman, who has properly had this matter upon 
his heart for years. As a last resort he proposed 
that we give them the $1.00 rate for a club of 
twenty or more. We confess that it was hard for 
us to write a letter declining to cut the rate ; but 
in view of the fact that every yearly subscriber 
actually costs us more than $1.00, what else 
could we do ? 

On Monday of this week we received a letter 
from the pastor, Brother Clegg, enclosing a list 
of twenty new subscribers taken at the regular 
rate, enclosing a good portion of the amount and 
pledging the balance in a short time, also stating 
that they expected to send as many more be- 
fore long. Besides, Brother Clegg is looking 
after the renewal of the old list. Brother Clegg 
will no doubt admit that, while loyal to the core, 
he has not been what we might term an ag- 
gressive man in this particular field. We are 
sure he will pardon us for taking the liberty of 
using this as an illustration of what can be done, 
and what must be done, if we continue to have a 
paper worthy to circulate among our people. 
This is the only hope. The sooner we all agree 
about it the better it will be for us. Our people 
are not going to subscribe for our paper on a 
mere recommendation or kindly mention. The 
pastor and our leading laymen, who know the 
value of the paper, must go after them. 



A CAMPAIGN OF EDUCATION 

Education and evangelization go hand in 
hand. They were joined together by Jesus 
Christ in the Great Commission, and no man 
can put them asunder and succeed. As reported 
by St. Matthew, Jesus said, "Go ye therefore 
and teach all nations, .... teaching them to 
observe all things, whatsoever I have command- 
ed you." Thus the gospel is to present Christ 
to the world as the light of the intellect as well 
as the soul. 

The truth is that the intellect is the avenue 
of approach to the heart, and while it is true 
that salvation does not depend absolutely upon 
intellectual processes, yet Paul gives us the 
logical relation of the intellect to the matter 
of personal salvation, when he says that "faith 
eorneth by hearing, and hearing by the word of 
God." "If ye know these things happy are ye 
if ye do them," says Christ, again recognizing 
knowledge as the basis of right doing and its 
result, personal happiness. 

We must admit that many well-disposed peo- 
ple are far from being what they should, and 
come far short of enjoying many blessings that 
are theirs, for the simple reason that they do 
not know — they have not the knowledge that 
enables one to appropriate the good things that 
are in reach of them. There is a story, well 



authenticated, that a North Carolina man, for 
many years, made a door prop of a stone, as he 
supposed, which afterwards proved to be an al- 
most solid nugget of gold. Of course the fab- 
ulous value of the little object, lying for so 
many years about the door, meant nothing to 
the owner, for the reason that he was ignorant 
of its value. The same ignorance abounding 
among neighbors, made him secure in the pos- 
session of it. 

This is but an object lesson of what prevails 
almost everywhere today. The dreariest aspect 
of the field as viewed from the standpoint of 
an intelligent, consecrated minister of the gos- 
pel, is the prevalent ignorance and consequent 
prejudice with which he has to contend. The 
great mass of humanity presents one vast pic- 
ture of intellectual and spiritual darkness. The 
people, coming in daily contact with the best 
things, and yet not able to discern, appreciate 
and appropriate them. The man in our illus- 
tration not only had a chunk of gold lying at 
his door, but there were rich stores of it under 
the surface of his fields, where, with much 
sweat and toil, he barely managed to eke out an 
existance. So the people, many of them, to 
whom we are sent to minister, are ignorant of 
the vast resources of wealth, intellect and spir- 
itual enjoyment, that are actually in their pos- 
session, if they could only have eyes to see. Our 
people do not enter- with joy into the real pos- 
session of that which they have, and it remains 
for us to lead them into such paths of enlight- 
ening truth, as will enable them to do so, lest 
they forfeit what they have. 

* * • # 

When we think of these things, how clearly 
the conviction comes that we are not using the 
means of enlightenment as we should. It will 
avail nothing to invoke light and at the same 
time neglect to remove obstructions. We must 
establish the agencies by which our people are to 
be brought into intelligent use of the means 
whereby the higher intellectual powers and 
spiritual impulses of the nature may be made to 
contribute to the happiness of living. The pulpit 
must take advantage of its opportunity to point 
out the more excellent way, even in those things 
that pertain to the physical comfort of man. 
It is not a vain gospel that makes a man aspire 
to be prosperous that he may make his home 
more comfortable and attractive. Nor is it a 
vain pospel that awakens in the masses a pur- 
pose to be more cleanly and attractive in per- 
son. Moreover, a gospel is but half preached 
that does not awaken in the minds of those who 
hear a desire to develop all the powers of the 
mind, so as to be able to know things —to ac- 
quire knowledge and use it for the better enjoy- 
ment of life ourselves, the good of our fellow- 
men, and the glory of God. In short, a full gos- 
pel addresses itself to all sides of the problem 
of life, and not only emancipates the soul from 
the thralldom of sin, but enlightens the un- 
derstanding, and makes the desert blossom as 
the rose. 

The curse of the earth is man's ignorance, as 
only a little observation will prove. As we 
write there comes before us a picture in mem- 
ory. Beside the highway, there was in the 
days of our boyhood, a little farm.- The hillsides 
were gaping gullies, and along the little stream 
that wended its way through little plats of bot- 
tom, the briars and brambles invaded the fields, 
till only small strips were left for cultivation. 
The fences were broken down and the briars 
that grew along these had gone on a journey to 
meet those growing along the banks of the 
stream. The house in which the family dwelt, 
and all the surroundings, had a tumble-down 
look. There was nothing but squalor within. 
In process of time this man, in sheer despair, 
moved out and another came to dwell in his 
stead. The neighbors shook their heads and 
said he too would be doomed to poverty. But 
it was not so. With him he brought intelligent 
methods, and with industry and intelligent per- 
severance, the gullies were soon closed, the 
briars and brambles disappeared, the fences 
were set up again, and the waters of that stream 
were soon kissing grassy banks. All the prem- 
ises were neat and attractive, and the new- 
comer was not only making a living, but was 
marketing a surplus, living in comfort and 
serving God and his country by rearing a happy 



family. Let us not forget Isaiah's vision 
the gospel day, as one that will remove tl 
curse from the physical world, thus showii 
that the gospel that saves in the fullest, cor 
pletest sense is the gospel of intellectual ar 
spiritual emancipation. 

The North Carolina Christian aqvu^i 
wants to help in this great work, and we a 
peal to every preacher and layman to come 
our help, that we may find way somehow in 
every home in every pastoral charge this yea 
There is no agency that will make a more effl 
ient co-worker with every pastor than tl 
church paper, and these first months of tl 
year should be used diligently in sowing dow 
the whole field with good literature. 



CHILDREN AND CHURCH ATTENDANC 

The importance of the subject justifies repea 
ed discussion. If we are to have congregatioi 
at the regular preaching service in the nes 
generation, we must train them for it in thii 
There is now a menace at both ends of th 
Sunday school. For some years it has been ot 
served that, in many large congregations, bi 
few of the children remain for the Sunda 
school. A recent complaint is that the large oi 
ganized classes in many places are showing 
disposition to turn their backs upon the preach 
ing service. If either is true to any serieus ex 
tent, it makes a terrible indictment against th 
Sunday school. 

Of course the Sunday school, as such, is no 
to blame. As a real auxiliary of the churcl 
and as a receruiting agency for the preaehinj 
service, there is nothing which affords greate 
possibilities than the Sunday school; but it 
helpfulness depends upon the character of th 
superintendent and teachers. Our opinion i 
that where children go away from the preach 
ing service, the fault is mainly with teacher: 
of superficial calibre, and the same may be saic 
of adult classes. A "smart Aleck" who abuse! 
a great opportunity in such a way ought to b< 
relieved of his place, no matter how capable h( 
may be intellectually; though, of courso; h< 
ought to be labored with first with the ho;ie oi 
reformation. 

Rev. Dr. J. A. Burrow, editor of the Midlanc 
Methodist, who, by the way is also presiding 
elder of the Chattanooga District, and in i 
position to have practical knowledge of thf 
things about which he writes, says, 

"If the Sunday schools of the land should 
though unintentionally, encourage the idea thai 
church attendance is unnecessary, then th( 
Sunday schools would be a menace. The unin 
tentional encouragement might consist in habit 
ual failure to urge attendance at church, to agi 
tate the question, or to even announce th< 
preaching. Since the world is to be saved by th( 
'foolishness of preaching,' and since a habit oi 
not going to church may follow the scholars 
out into the mature world, it can readily b< 
seen how dissastrous such encouragement f roir 
such a source might be. 

For organized classes to hold a session im 
mediately following the Sunday school, hour 
and then deliberately walk away from the 
preaching service is to make the organized class 
a menace. If we are to have organization thai 
acts as a substitute for the public worship oi 
God, then that organization will do more harm 
than good. The light setting aside of this 
public worship is the menace of the hour, and il 
behooves the watchmen on Zion's walls to lift 
their voices in alarm. 

Sunday school teachers sometimes talk 
learnedly and eloquently to their classes, and 
then coolly walk home to spend the preaching 
hour in reading papers and magazines. A 
teacher who does this frequently is not the 
person to teach. The sooner some one else is 
given that class, the better it will be for an 
concerned. The teacher is an example, and 
should set the pupils in the right way. Tc 
encourage them in what they are glad enough 
to get encouragement in is bad — very bad. 

If it be true, as some allege, that attendance 
today upon the preaching of the Word is suf- 
fering a decline, what about the future, when 
the untrained church-goers of modern Sunday 
schools become the men and women of our con- 
stituency ? Will they pick up a habit after they 
are grown? Who will be to blame? Parents 
first, and Sunday schools next ? If parents arc 



February 4, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN: ADVOCATE 



Page Three 



firm in enforcing attendance upon day schools, 
where the children learn grammar and geogra- 
phy, ought they not to enforce attendance upon 
church, where the children learn of Him who 
made tongues and continents? Are grammar 
and geography more momentous than the king- 
dom of God? 

We must begin to cry aloud. Danger is at 
our doors. Our Sunday schools are good and 
great, but they are secondary to the preaching 
of divine truth." 



DEATH OF REV. ALPHEUS E. WILEY 

Rev. Alpheus E. Wiley, whose illness we an- 
nounced last week, passed away at the home of 
his daughter at Clift'side on Sunday morning, 
January 31st. Brother Wiley suffered a stroke 
of paralysis at Gold Hill some years ago, and 
had not been able since that time to do any work, 
and has remained on the superannuate list. Not 
long ago he had an attack of grippe from which 
he had not recovered and from the effects of 
which he died. 

If we mistake not Brother Wiley was a na- 
tive of Rowan County. He joined the North 
Carolina Conference at Statesville in 1883, and 
is the second one of that class of fourteen to 
pass away. The class consists of Ashby, Bowles, 
Brothers, Blair, Daily, T. J., Hurley, John, 
Shamburger, Smith, M. A., Troy, Tuttle, D. H., 
Underwood, Wiley and Woosley. 

That all these men save two, after thirty-one 
years, should still be living, and all the re- 
mainder be working save one, is a rather re- 
markable record. In this class there was no 
sweeter spirit nor more devoted and loyal itin- 
erant than Alpheus E. Wiley. When stricken 
with the malady which disabled him, he was pre- 
paring to go to his appointment, and since 
that day has awaited in quiet resignation the 
call of the Master to his reward in the Fath- 
er's house. 

The body was laid beside that of his wife in 
Union county, she having passed away some 
years ago. We hope to be furnished a full me- 
1 mojOPfor publication at an early day. 



THE RETIRED MINISTER 

We are printing a little story this week on 
the fifth page to which we call special atten- 
tion. It pictures better than we can a con- 
dition which exists among us unnoticed, large- 
ly because such men and their families suffer in 
silence. Men and women of the finest fiber, 
who, in the days of their strength, laid them- 
selves out in unselfish service, not reckoning 
about future needs, and are now too high- 
minded to assume the role of mendicant. Mod- 
estly the old hero of our story tells that "the 
little home rents for six dollars per month 
when it is occupied. I receive a small sum from 
the ministerial Relief Fund. You know there 
are so many demands on the Church in these 
days, etc." ; 

In these words of the poor old man is pic- 
tured the tragedy of a minister's old age and 
the unwitting cruelty of the church at large. 
Stressing to the breaking point the demands of 
our Educational and Missionary propeganda we 
forget the men and women whose sacrificing la- 
bors have made the church what it is today. 
As we write we have in mind a man who, in 
the days of his greatest efficiency, frequently 
gave one-fifth of his salary to help push the 
work forward in his charge. Today this man 
receives from the superannuate fund less per 
annum than he was accustomed to give in for- 
mer years. 

At our last Annual Conference a feeble effort 
was made to increase our fund for superannu- 
ates, but the "many demands" seem to be in 
the way of any advance in this respect. This 
feeble effort, however, is an encouraging sign, 
and we are hoping that some of our men of 
means will get together and organize a move- 
ment that will eventually wipe out all reproach 
so far as the Western North Carolina Confer- 
ence is concerned. We hope to live to see the 
day when it may be said that no man who has 
given his life to the service of the church shall 
be doomed to suffer in silence for lack of the 
things that would make life comfortable. 

There is no good reason why one hundred 
thousand Methodists in Western North Carolina 
should allow any of these old veterans to suf- 



fer. All that we need is to get a just perspec- 
tive and not only give liberally, but give in- 
telligently, of our means. Let the reader look 
up the story referred to, headed "The Stui,y 
the Old Canvasser Told." 



NOTE AND COMMENT 

The German Submarine which has been raid- 
ing so successfully about the English coast is 
reported to have sunk five English Merchant 
ships early this week. It begins to look as if 
one or two submarines properly manned may 
yet prove of more value in naval warfare than 
a whole squadron of warships. 

# * # # 

The Movement to Establish a Reformatory 

for fallen women ought to have zealous support. 
Such a bill is now before our Legislature and 
we hope the way may be clear to establish wo 
institution at once. That we may appreciate 
fully the necessity for such an institution it is 
only necessary to recall the fact that, when a 
young woman goes wrong there is scarcely a 
place where she may take refuge from the scorn 
of society with any hope of encouragement or 
help. The rescue and reformation of this class 
is a work in which the whole state is interested 
and to which the whole state should contribute. 

# # * * 

Wages for Convicts. We are glad to note 
that a bill has been introduced in the House 
of Representatives providing for the payment 
of the wages of convicts to their families. The 
bill provides that there shall be, j allowed as 
compensation for the labor of all prisoners 
serving terms of not less than six months and 
engaged in hard labor the sum of $b cents per 
day. The amount to be paid over to the wife 
and children of dependent families.. This is 
a law for which the Advocate has contended 
for years and we sincerely hope to see it en- 
acted. 

* # * * 

The Bill to Prohibit the Shipment of Liquor 

into the State for beverage purposes is now be- 
fore the Legislature. It seems, from reports 
in the papers, that there is some hesitation un 
the part of members of the Legislature about 
giving the bill their support. Some ( are propos- 
ing that the bill be referred to the people, thus 
subjecting the State to the worry and expense 
of another election. The editor of the Advo- 
cate is willing to take the responsibility of say- 
ing that the only trouble about the, bill is that 
it proposes to stop the last hole and effectually 
prohibit all traffic in liquor. This the poli- 
ticians are afraid of and some would now re- 
sort of political dodge of referring it to "the 
dear people." The people voted for prohibi- 
tion seven years ago, but have never yet got 
what they voted for. Now that it is proposed 
in this bill to give them what they voted for, 
the politicians want to refer it to them again. 
Well, let them refer it if it is too hot for them 
to handle, and the people will show them some- 
thing. Meantime, however, we shall have again 
millions of corruption money turned loose upon 
us by the -liquor magnates. Why hesitate and 
subject the State to a flood of filth, when every 
one knows that the decency and intelligence 

of the State is calling for the bill? 

* • • # 

Bishop Atkins spoke to the Woman's Mis- 
sionary Society and the people of Charlotte in 
an illuminating way last Sunday night on 
things as he saw them in the Orient on his re- 
cent visit. We quote from the report in Mon- 
day's Charlotte Observer: 

"The population of China is estimated at 
400,000,000. After spending awhile there I 
was quite prepared to believe there were 4,000,- 
000,000, if anyone had made the statement with 
the shadow of a title. Ever and anon I would 
strike some place that I never heard of, and 
that did not appear on the map as a city. On 
inquiry I found that its population numbered a 
quarter of a million." 

All these Oriental peoples are intensely relig- 
ious. "In that fact is our hope and inspiration 
and in it, too, is their hope of eternal salva- 
tion." A religion that is earth-born and of 
man never rises higher than its source, he added, 
and the easiest way to ruin a man is to get him 
on the wrong side in his religious nature. Yet 
contemplating those vast multitudes, the bish- 



op's mind recoiled from the idea that all of 
them and their ancestors through the centuries 
have been hopelessly lost, and he declared his 
belief that many of them have wrought out 'their 
salvation through the death of Jesus Christ. He 
could not conceive, he said, of God falling short 
of making ample and full provision for these 
great struggling masses of humanity. Yet this 
is no reason, he added, why Christians should 
not strive to the utmost of their ability to lift 
them to the heights of Christianity. 

The mission work of the Methodist Church in 
the Orient is of two classes, educational and 
evangelical. Yet educational work there is very 
different from what it is here. There is not 
a single school whose ultimate object is not to 
capture the life of the student for Christ. There 
is not a teacher, no matter what his subject, who 
does not have as a bed-rock motive the absorb- 
ing desire to win the pupil to Christ. The 
speaker described some of the colleges and also 
the kindergartens. The latter, he said, is the 
grandest institution of all, for "a little child 
shall lead them," and the tiny children who 
learn practical things to do, as well as Christian 
maxims, are instrumental in arousing the in- 
terest of their families in the new religion. 

Korea politically is in better condition since 
its annexation by Japan, said Bishop Atkins. 
The oppression by native rulers is ended and 
much development has occurred. By the change 
Korea has secured a railroad, which it would 
probably never have obtained in a thousand 
years, and it is of a better grade, broader guage 
than the Japanese railroads, though the latter 
are operated with clock-like precision and accu- 
racy. Government farm schools have been es- 
tablished, too. The Korean is a big, handsome, 
majestic looking man, with something of an in- 
tellectual element. A process of intermarriage 
with the Japanese has begun and this promises 
to produce the greatest combination in the Ori- 
ent. The Korean is a dreamer, but he also 
has a practical side which is being cultivated. 

"There is no bigger man on the face of the 
earth than the Chinaman when he is fully de- 
veloped under favorable circumstances," said 
the speaker narrating instances observed on 
the Pacific coast where Chinamen of the lowest 
standing have developed in character and re- 
sponsibility under American civilization. The 
Chinese system makes honesty impossible, but 
under the American system honesty becomes his 
cardinal trait. 

' ' The Japanese woman when fully developed 
under the influence of Christianity is going to 
be one of the most charming and useful women 
on earth." 

Bishop Atkins told how it is a custom in Chi- 
na, the original land of firecrackers, to honor a 
visiting prince by deafening explosions. One 
kind of cracker hurls itself 250 feet into the air 
and explodes with a detonation like a cannon. 
At one place, when the train stopped at his des- 
tination, he heard the uproar and inquired of 
his escort, "What prince is on this train?" 
"You are," was the response, and it was even 
so. A rousing reception was accorded to him 
and to Mrs. Atkins. 

"It put your ordinary Christmas Eve cele- 
bration to shame. It was almost awful. It 
sounded like war, ' ' said Bishop Atkins. ' ' But 
it was all right. It showed that they loved their 
church. ' ' 

The bishop had planned to have an interview 
with the Emperor of Japan, but this, like a good 
many other things, was prevented by the out- 
break of the war. The Emperor was busy with 
his ministers. 

The bishop at the beginning of his address 
said the scope of the subject was too vast to 
admit of adequate treatment^ and that he could 
not hope to even suggest the greatness of the 
field and of the mission accomplishments. At 
five minutes past nine he said, "Well, I sup- 
pose I had better stop. There's no end to it. 
Good night." 



— Rev. R. T. Vann, who for many years has 
been at the head of Meredith College, the great 
Baptist institution for the education of women 
at Raleigh, has been elected Secretary of the 
Board of Education and will be expected to 
take up his duties at the close of the college fis- 
cal year and give his whole time to the work. 



/ 



Page Four 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 4, 191 



I CONTRIBUTIONS j 

GERMANY AGAIN 

J. M. Rowland 

Since my last article passed the censor and 
I have not been arrested for violating the 
laws of neutrality, I have it in mind to finish 
my say about Germany. There are some things 
about this little nation that we need to keep in 
mind at this particular time. 

If Germany could be put down upon us here 
it would cover Maryland, Virginia, North Caro- 
lina, South Carolina and Georgia. It would 
take fourteen such countries to make one as 
large as the United States. This is the size of 
the little country that has thrown half the earth 
into war and stunned the entire world. The 
population is nearly seventy million, about two- 
thirds as many folks as we have. The popula- 
tion per square mile is ten times as great as 
ours. The German navy is second in the waters 
of the world and at the beginning of this war 
she had a trained army of over five million sol- 
diers or more than ten times the size of the 
army of the United States, counting every 
trained soldiers we could possibly muster. This 
shows that you cannot say there are no germs 
in Germany if you mean war germs. Our wealth 
is seventy billion dollars more than the wealth 
of Germany and our war expenses thirty-two 
million dollars less. At the beginning of the 
war the national debt of Germany was nearly 
two billion dollars, with an interest of fi f iy-five 
million dollars yearly or nearly a dollar yearry 
for every man, woman and child the empire. 
It is estimated that the first year's war will 
add an expense of twelve dollars upon every 
man, woman and child besides the awful dam- 
age to property and the destruction of human 
life. 

The salary of the German Emperor is $3,698,- 
260, besides income from vast estates belong- 
ing to the crown, which would doubtless run his 
pay up to the enormous sum of six million dol- 
lars a year. In other words every time the 
President of the United States draws one dollar 
for administering the duties of his office, the 
Kaiser draws sixty dollars for running a coun- 
try fourteen times smaller. These facts will 
give some idea of the burdens that autocratic 
government puts on a people. The marvel of it 
is they submit to it. 

In addition to the crime of Bleeding Bel- 
gium, which history and the Judge of the earth 
will lay at the door of the German Emperor, 
if it is possible he is guilty of worse things 
than prostrating this innocent country and con- 
serving the powers of his kingdom for years in 
such a way as to cause this most bloody and 
senseless war the world has known. He has 
gone forth with his drawn sword and engines 
of hell, his garments streaming in blood of his 
fellows, representing himself as the agent ana 
representative of Almighty God. He is the 
leader of the hosts of God. It is ,'me and 
God," but mostly "me." He makes God a 
bloody murderous German, under the dictates 
of the German army, instead of the merciful 
Father of us all. If he had left God out of 
it we might respect him more. 

Another crime just as great is the part he 
played in bringing Turkey into the war. "When 
he made the proposition to Turkey he well 
knew that it would cause the awful horrors of 
a "Holy "War," in which the cruel Turks 
would rise to slay all foreigners, including the 
missionaries, their wives and little children. 
This is just the reason he made the compact. 
He hoped when the devil was turned loose in 
Turkey, England would be so busy looking 
after the helpless foreigners there that he could 
have a better chance to grind the bodies and 
souls of men in his war machines further north. 
This man is drunk on blood and military power 
and it will be the darkest day the history of 
modern civilization has known if he wins, but 
he will not win. 

Before we leave Germany for that eventful 
trij) through the south of Europe there are 
a few tilings more pleasant than the above, I 
desire to say. I was greatly impressed with a 



sign I saw in Hamburg as we were leaving that 
city. Over the home office of the "Hamburg 
American Steamship Line ' ' I read their motto : 
"The World is My Field," and was told they 
borrowed it from John Wesley. 

We visited the Emperor's palace, for which 
we paid 12% cents. It was rich and beauti- 
ful. Upon its walls we read a welcome sign, 
to the effect that servants and employees were 
not allowed to accept tips. The palace was 
arranged with a Red Room, Blue Room, etc., 
as our White House is, but had a more kingly 
appearance. 

We found Dresden not so large a eity as 
Berlin but even more attractive and beauti- 
ful. Here we saw the Green Vault, so named 
because of a rare stone, a green diamond, the 
only one in the world. The collection of crown 
jewels is valued at twelve million dollars. A 
royal stove is shown that cost twelve thousand 
dollars, along with many trinkets, wine cups 
and gems running into millions of dollars, 
which gives you a good example of how the 
babies of royalty spend the people's money 
for their toys. We beheld one piece of statu- 
ary which, according to the guide, required 
seventeen men seven years to finish. The most 
interesting thing here, however, was Martin 
Luther's communion cup. When we thought of 
the inspired lips that touched that cup all the 
crown jewels, wine bowls and trinkets became 
indeed the toys of children. You cannot think 
of Germany without thinking of Martin Luther. 
And when you look upon that black spot on the 
wall of his room and are told that it was caused 
by his throwing his ink bottle at the face of the 
devil who was there to dissuade him as he wrote 
the declaration of freedom from the oppression, 
you are prepared to believe it. His disciples 
have somewhat forsaken this great old saint like 
the disciples of Wesley have done, but his foot- 
prints are on the sands of time and will be 
until the last gust of eternity's wind has blown 
those sands away. 

Beyond a doubt the most interesting thing I 
saw in Germany was Raffael's "Sistine Madon- 
na," the greatest and most famous picture the 
hand of man has ever produced. Long had I 
hoped my feet might some day come this way 
and let me stand before this picture. The chil- 
dren of men throng the art galleries of" the 
world and jabber and sputter over articles of 
"art" that ought to be destroyed from among 
men, but they come at last to the top of the 
hill and stand enraptured, thrilled, softened, 
overpowered before the modest picture of the 
mother and her child. They are noisy and gar- 
rulous before many of the other scenes, but 
when they come to this picture without being 
told they stand with heads bared and bowed, 
their movements soft, their voices hushed, and 
the feet of the multitude come this way, and 
stand longest here. People of every station and 
class in life are coming. Rich, poor, old and 
young, wise and ignorant. Day after day, year 
after year they come. They stand, they sit 
about the little chapel and look and look and 
look. Few speak, many let unhindered tears 
flow down thei r cheeks, many tremble. The 
hope of the human heart is in that" something 
that selects from all the pictures it ever sees, 
the mother and the child, to hang the highest 
on the walls of the soul. No one could describe 
that picture, though many try. You must see 
it to know it. The light of heaven falls on it. 
The mother's feet are on the clouds with all 
things of earth underneath. In her face is the 
glorified, immortalized life and light of moth- 
erhood. Her arms are clasped about her little 
child. His little white hands are on hers; his 
little innocent face is resting against his moth- 
er's face. Beneath the clouds, looking up as 
you are looking up, are two cherubs, while over ' 
the faces of Mary and the little child Christ, 
falls the heavenly light of redemption and the 
Fatherhood of God. In this scene heaven and 
earth are meeting together, the hand of man 
and God clasp each other. It is a great hour 
for a soul that has any art in it to stand before 
that picture, not to worship it, but to look be- 
yond it to that which it pictures. It is on wood 
and covers the side of a room. Rockefeller 
has offered a fabulous sum for this picture, but 
it is not for sale. This picture is four hun- 
dred years old and in perfect condition. Raf- 



f ael was a young man when he turned from hi 
hand this picture that has given him a f adeles 
name. He died in 1520 in Rome at the age o 
thirty-seven. 1 



IS THERE NOT A PEACEFUL METHOI 
OF SECURING FUTURE PEACE? 

Thomas Kane 

All the advocates of peace seem to agree tha 
to secure permanent peace four things are nec 
essary : First, there must be disarmament. Sec 
ond, there must be an end of making prepara 
tions for war between nations. Third, then 
must be an international court of arbitration 
Fourth, there must be an international polict 
and naval armament of sufficient size and powe] 
to enforce the decisions of the Internationa 
Court. 

The question is: Are all these necessary' 
If the nations become convinced that ther« 
would be no more war between them, time 
would bring disarmament. If war shoulc 
cease, while an international police would do nc 
harm, there would be nothing for it to do. An 
International Court of Arbitration is, of course, 
a necessity, but is there not another entirely 
peaceful, friendly and yet efficient and inex- 
pensive method of securing obedience to the 
Court's decision? 

Remembering that nations, no matter how 
large, are made up of individuals, and that in 
each of these individuals the pocket is the most 
sensitive as well as the most vulnerable nerve, 
suppose that our country should take the lead 
in offering to combine with other peace-loving 
and non-military nations in a treaty agreeing 
that we and they would impose an additional 
duty of say ten per cent, on all products or any 
country sent to our markets or to the markets 
of the other nations joining in the treaty, which 
refused to discontinue making preparation for 
war. Also that the same duty should be paid 
on all products from other countries carried in 
vessels bearing the flag of the nation that per- 
sisted in preparing for war. Would not war 
between commercial and manufacturing unions 
automatically cease? 

To illustrate: Suppose at the close of the 
present war Germany should decide to continue 
making preparations for future war. Germany 
is named, because while the terms of the treaty 
would apply to all nations alike, Germany in 
recent years has been making the most thorough 
preparation for war. Suppose France should 
complain to the International Court that Ger- 
many was arming and that unless she stopped, 
France too must arm in order to be prepared for 
war. The International Court would cite rep- 
resentatives of Germany to appear before it 
within a given time, and make answer to the 
complaint of France. If she declined to obey 
the summons within the specified time, or to 
obey the decision of the court, should it be 
against her, the terms of the treaty between 
peace-loving nations would automatically take 
effect, and just as automatically the whole sub- 
ject would be transferred to the people of Ger- 
many. It would cease to interest other nations 
except as a matter of news. But it would be- 
come at once the question of questions, not to 
the rulers only, but to every man, woman and 
child old enough to think in all Germany. In 
this one fact lies the key to the situation and its 
solution. 

If the rulers and people decided to pay the 
additional tariff of ten per cent rather than dis- 
continue preparing for war, the tariff 30uld be 
increased until it would become practically pro- 
hibitory. With such conditions and possibili- 
ties, all under the control of the nation:? signing 
the treaty, is it not safe to conclude that the 
German people would decide that preparations 
for war must cease? 

Of course, Germany or any other country 
which insisted on continuing preparations for 
war could retaliate by levying the same or even 
higher duties against the products of peace- 
loving countries, but would she do it? Would 
the people indorse such a course ? It would seem 
that to ask the question is to answer it. 

We should never forget that war of itself is 
punishment. Both parties are losers — the vic- 
tor only less than the vanquished. Our efforts 
as lovers of peace should be against preparation 



February 4, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Five 



for war. Would not this method be feasible? 
Would it not be successful if the United States 
alone decided to adopt it ? 



PREPARING FOR THE REVIVAL 

The first preparation is that which begins in 
the heart of the preacher himself . In the great 
deep of his own heart he hears the voice of the 
Spirit calling him to the work. He comes to 
know why the ancient prophets sometimes 
spoke of their message as a burden. The Word 
of the Lord becomes as fire in his bones. 

Out of this comes great prayerfulness. He is 
possessed of a consuming desire to see the sal- 
vation of his people. He must pray, and he 
must prevail. As he prays, faith grows. ' ' Faith 
is the substance of things hoped for, the evi- 
dence of things not seen." He comes to feel 
that these strong desires, this celestial passion, 
must have some real connection with things 
about to come to pass. That it can not be mere 
fantasy of the mind, but an apprisement of di- 
vine possibilities within reach. Faith becomes 
vision. Like Elijah on Carmel, he hears the 
' ' sound of an abundance of rain. ' ' There is a 
"going in the mulberry trees." 

Gradually out of this glorious vision of prom- 
ise plans emerge for its realization. The Spir- 
it who imparts faith, and gives the vision, can 
also lead the mind in practical details. As the 
preacher broods over the situation, as his heart 
yearns over his people as a mother over her 
children, certain persons will come to mind as 
those most in sympathy with the work. These 
must be his chief of staff. His mind, illumi- 
nated by more than earthly wisdom, sees strat- 
egic points in his church organization. He 
feels impelled to do certain things, such as have 
a heart-to-heart talk with a Sunday school 
superintendent, a conference of Sunday school 
teachers, an unannounced experience meeting, 
to form a prayer list. And about this time 
he begins to meet with evidences that the Lord 
who has been leading him has also been touch- 
ing ofhers. Unexpected confirmation of his 
faith is found as he goes forward. The Lord 
who gives Peter the vision has also been busy 
at the house of Cornelius. 

Then preaching takes on another character. It 
takes on a yearning tenderness not known be- 
fore. The preacher begins to see new depth 
of meaning in the compassion of the Master for 
the multitudes in the days of his flesh. He comes 
to know the blessedness of weeping over sin- 
ners. He finds in complete abandonment to 
himself to the work that he has ascended a 
throne of power and is able in the name of the 
Lord to wield a strange influence over the 
consciences of men. He now knows that preach- 
ing the gospel is the most glorious privilege 
ever given to men. The Word of God be- 
comes a sharp threshing instrument in his 
hands, a two-edged sword, dividing the very 
thoughts and intent of the heart. Again, it be- 
comes the balm of Gilead to heal and make 
alive. And now the work multiplies. The bat- 
tle is on, and every hour brings its need for 
heavenly skill, for quick decision, and serpen- 
tine wisdom. But the man of God finds that he 
is not alone. The great Captain is on the field, 
and as Paid he can say: "I can do all things 
through Christ which strengtheneth me. ' ' Un- 
expected illumination comes in preaching. Ser- 
mons spring out of the most unlikely looking 
texts. Divine flashes break out of the Word 
where hitherto it has been a sealed book. The 
preacher becomes an astonishment to himself 
and to others. He begins to understand why 
the multitude were swayed as Peter preached 
at Pentecost. He is ashamed of former faith- 
lessness and coldness. He sees now that the 
gospel thus preached is ever the power of God 
xmto salvation, and has all that is needed for a 
lost world. Given this preparation on the part 
of the preacher himself, and all others will 
come. — J. A. Baylor, in Midland Methodist. 



THE STORY THE OLD CANVASSER TOLD 

' ' Good morning, madam. Can I interest you 
in my line of specialities ? ' ' 

It was the same old inquiry that was made at 
my door that bright spring morning; but, ordi- 
nary as the words might be, I realized instinct- 
ively that it was no ordinary canvass that thus 
addressed me. Voice, manner and pronunciation 



evidenced that my caller was a man of culture 
and refinement. The slender form and slightly 
stooping shoulders bore witness to scholarly 
habits. 

It is a pathetic sight and one which strongly 
appeals to me to see an aged person striving 
to eke out a scanty living by going about with 
the inevitable handbag of light wares, seeking 
patronage from house to house. The man who 
stood at my door was apparently about sev- 
enty years of age ; and as his goods were sta- 
ples of which I happened to be in need, I gladly 
invited him in to sit and rest while I made my 
selection. Always on the alert for a story, es- 
pecially one from real life in its infinite phases, 
I felt that there was one not far to seek. 

"Sir," I remarked, busying myself among 
his goods, "I perceive that you are a man with 
a past; you have not always been a canvas- 
ser. Am I warranted in asking what part in 
the world's work you have taken in other 
days?" 

His answer was a question. "What would 
you fancy ? " he asked with a quiet smile. 

"As you stood at the door," I made answer, 
"I was reminded of words spoken long ago by 
a brave soldier : ' I bear in my body the mai-KS 
of the Lord Jesus. ' I believe, sir, that you are 
a retired minister." 

The "light that never was on land or sea" 
lighted up the worn old face at this evidence 
of soul recognition. The stooping shoulders 
straightened. 

"You have rightly judged. I retired from 
the ministry five years ago after spending for- 
ty years as an ambassador for my King." 

' ' Forty years in the service of the Church ! ' ' 
I exclaimed. "And now" — I pause with a 
deprecating glance at the scattered wares about 
me. 

"Yes, I understand," he answered gently. 
"Yet you must not feel that 'some strange 
thing' has befallen me. I am only one in a 
goodly company. It is a very simple story, ' 
he continued, "and one often duplicated among 
my brethren. Do you care to hear it?" 

I assured him of my interest, and the gently 
modulated voice continued : ' ' From the time I 
was called to the ministry I felt that I was 
peculiarly fitted for the home missionary field, 
and the first twenty years after my ordination 
were spent in the lumber and mining districts 
of Northern Michigan. You know what that 
means. It paid in glorious experiences, but in 
little else. The last twenty years of my min- 
istry were spent in more remunerative fields. 
Yet, owing to force of circumstances, 'mother' 
and I have come down to our threescore years 
and ten with no earthly wealth than two splen- 
did sons and a little home back East worth 
a few hundred dollars. There were four chil- 
dren in the little home missionary parsonage, 
one of whom passed away in childhood. It was 
a long, hard pull to see our two boys through 
college, but we had our reward." 

Again the brave old face was lighted up. 

"Yes," he repeated, "we had our reward; 
for they were both called to the foreign mis- 
sion field. One is in China, the other in Cen- 
tral Africa. We last saw them two years ago. 
. . . We shall not see them again till we hold 
our family reunion on the other side. ' ' 

I had ceased to examine the samples beiu±i 
me. I was looking on the drama of a life ; I was 
listening to music from the harp strings of a 
human heart. 

"Our daughter," continued the old soldier 
of the cross, while the harp strings were swept 
still more tenderly, "our daughter developed 
talents that justified us in giving her the best 
musical education that our means could com- 
mand. But just as she had begun what pron«- 
ised to prove a successful career, she failed so 
rapidly in health that an immediate chaage of 
climate was the only hope held out to us for 
her recovery. It has been such a comfort to 
me that at that time, in addition to securing 
our little home, I had gathered together a few 
hundred dollars, which enabled mother and 
Nellie to come to your own beautiful Pasadena, 
while I carried on the work at home the best 
I could alone. But the diesase had become 
thoroughly intrenched before we had even sus- 
pected. We did all we could;'. . . they were 
here a year; . . . then mother came home 



alone, leaving Nellie sleeping in beautiful 
Mountain View. We had always been so thank- 
ful that our little savings held out until she 
was past all need of earthly comforts." 

There was a long pause ere he resumed his 
story. 

"That was the last year of my ministry. 
Soon after my own failing health made us long 
for a warmer climate ; and last fall we sold 
such of our goods as we could realize the most 
from, rented the little home, and turned our 
faces toward the sunset. It was natural that 
we should come to Pasadena. Perhaps you un- 
derstand the attraction of a distant grave." 

Aye, I understand. "And your resources?" 
I asked impulsively. 

"The little home rents for six dollars per 
month when it is occupied. I receive a small 
sum from the Ministerial Relief Fund. You 
know there are so many demands on the Church 
in these days, ' ' he added apologetically. ' ' Then 
I have this little work; it is about all I am 
able to do. Some days I make as much as fifty 
cents on my sales, and mother is a capital man- 
ager, you see." 

Yes, it was obvious that "mother" was a 
capital manager. "But what of the coming 
years?" I asked. "The time may come that 
you will not be able to do even this work. ' ' 

A shadow fell athwart the face opposite me, 
but only for a moment. 

"Ah, dear madam, God does not come to the 
end of his resources when we come to ours." 
And then, as if forgetful of my presence, he 
repeated softly : " ' I have been young, and 
now I am old ; yet have I not seen the righteous 
forsaken, nor his seed begging bread." 



Since that spring morning there have been 
many precious interviews with the man of God 
and also with "mother," the "capital man- 
ager," who served her apprenticeship long ago 
in the home mission parsonage. The old hand- 
bag is still in evidence, and with it the bearer 
carries a benediction to those who have hearts 
to understand; and I rejoice that occasionally 
at least I have "entertained angels" not "un- 
awares." — Lena G. Brown, in the Advance. 

TIDINGS FROM THE MISSION FIELD 

Storming the Forts 

The steady onward movement of God's forces 
are seen in the regular weekly meetings, but we 
need sometimes to storm the forts by special 
effort. Such an effort has just been made m 
our four churches on the Kyoto Circuit and at 
Kyoto Station. The meeting lasted two weeks 
and many souls were reached with the gospel 
message for the first time. More than fifty ex- 
pressed a desire to be instructed more fully in 
these things. They are as earnest seekers after 
the light as I have ever tried to lead. In the 
Central the greatest results were realized, as we 
were able to reach more people in our new 
church building. About ten of them will be 
baptized before the end of the year. I am 
glad to be able to report that the congrega- 
tions in our new church are increasing regu- 
larly and conditions are most encouraging. — 
W. A. Davis, Kyoto, Japan. 

Anglo-Korean Graduates at the Top 

The Anglo-Korean School is the Mission 
Academy or Middle School. The efficiency of 
the faculty and the raising of the course of 
study to the recognized standard have been fea- 
tures which have given the school a degree 01' 
prominence hitherto unexperienced. The grad- 
uates of the class in March of this year stood 
higher in the tests given by the Educational 
Senate than the pupils from any other Acad- 
emy of the country. We have 110 pupils in the 
Higher Department, 160 pupils in the Pri- 
mary Department, and 25 in the Special Trades 
Course conducted by Mr. Deal. The spirit of 
the student body is excellent. This school will 
reach a larger number of students and will do 
greater work when further equipped with 
buildings and apparatus. — W. G. Cram, Song- 
do, Korea. 



By faith we can remove mountains. It would 
be well, however, for us to try our faith first on 
little hills. Some people are trying to heal 
diseases and cast the devils out of others who 
have not learned to be charitable. 



Page Six 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 4, 1915 



INTERESTING NEWS FROM FIELD j 



NOTES AND PERSONALS 

— Rev. S. E. Richardson requests us to state 
that his post office address is East Spencer and 
not Salibury as stated in the minutes. 

— Rev. J. J. Eads is holding revival services 
at Shepherds on the Troutman circuit. Rev. 
G. W. Pink, of Rhodiss is assisting the pastor. 

—Mr. R. C. Marshall, of Taylorsville, and 
Miss Sallie Keller, of Blowing Rock, were united 
in matrimony at the parsonage in Boone on 
Saturday, Jan. 2 3rd, Rev. D. P. Waters officiat- 
ing. 

— Rev. T. A. Groce, of Sulphur Springs cir- 
cuit, requests that we thank the following for 
donations for seating Pisgah church : Asbury 
S. S., $2.10; North Asheville S. S., $1.00; Sandy 
Mush S. S., $1.00 ; Acton Philathea class, $1.00. 

— Rev. Albert S. Barnes, of the North Caroli- 
na Conference, has been elected Superintend- 
ent of the Methodist Orphanage at Raleigh, suc- 
seeding Rev. Jno. N. Cole, who passed away last 
month. Brother Barnes is one of the younger 
members of his Conference and is just coming 
into his prime. 

— Rev. Dr. H. M. North, presiding elder, of 
the Durham District, has been appointed by 
Bishop Waterhouse to the Duke MemoriaL 
church, to fill the vacancy caused by the death 
of Rev. Leslie P. Howard. We have not learn- 
ed at this writing who will succeed Dr. North 
on the district. 

— Rev. R. M. Courtney, pastor of West End, 
Winston-Salem, visited Albemarle last week and 
made an address on our mission work to the 
congregation of Central church on Friday eve- 
ning. Referring to his visit the Enterprise 
says : It was a matter of regret to those present 
that the entire membership of the church could 
not hear the able minister's inspiring words. 

— Rev. E. L. Kirk, who has been a student 
of Scarritt-Morrisville College, Morrisville, Mo., 
for the past three years, is now at his home 
near Albemarle, and will remain here till next 
fall. Brother Kirk has done supply work in the 
West each summer since he has been there 
and is available now for such work if there 
should be an opening. His address is Albe- 
marle, N. C, Route 1. 

— Rev. E. M. Avett, pastor of the Fines Creek 
circuit, was married to Miss Annie Tucker, of 
Granite Quarry, on Tuesday, January 26th. The 
ceremony took place at the home of Mr. J. A. 
Brown, brother-in-law of the bride, at Granite 
Quarry and was performed by Rev. P. W. Tuck- 
er, brother of the bride. The Advocate joins 
the numerous friends of the couple in hearty 
congratulations. 

— Rev. Dr. E. K. McLarty, pastor of Tryon 
St. church, Charlotte, is conducting a series of 
meetings in the Y. M. C. A. hall at Trinity 
College this week. These meetings are of extra- 
ordinary importance for the reason that the stu- 
dent body will be largely brought under the in- 
fluence of the gospel, as presented by this ear- 
nest preacher. 

— The Ministerial Association of Newton pre- 
sents a strong plea to the Aldermen of the town 
to require the one pool room to take down 
screens, remove frosted windows and do things 
in the open. This is right. Why do such 
places try to conceal things? There is but one 
answer: "Men love darkness rather than light, 
because their deeds are evil." 

— A Training School for Sunday school 
teachers and workers is to be organized in 
Greensboro this week. A preliminary meeting 
looking to the permanent organization was held 
in the West Market Street Annex on Tuesday 
evening. This training school is to be con- 
ducted under the auspices of the State Sunday 
School Association and will therefore be inter- 
denominational. 

— The Black Mountain correspondent of the 
Raleigh News and Observer says: "The Meth- 
odist Colony Company is by no means inactive. 
There are several new houses being erected on 
the property and the officials of the company 
expect to build a large lake on the property the 
approaching summer. The lake will be named 



Lake Tomahawk. About forty thousand dollars 
worth of lots have been sold in the past eighteen 
months and about ten miles of streets have been 
opened and graded. 

— The Salisbury correspondent of the daily 
press last week announced that arrangements 
have been made to have Rev. Dr. W. F. Mc- 
Murry in Salisbury and Spencer Sunday, Feb- 
ruary 7. Dr. McMurry is secretary of the Board 
of Church Extension of the Southern Methodist 
Church and comes here in the interest of 
Holmes Memorial church, which is preparing to 
build a new house of worship. Dr. McMurry 
will be accompanied for the services by Dr. W. 
R. Ware, presiding elder of the Salisbury Dis. 
trict. 

— Through the Winston-Salem Sentinel we 
learn of the death of Mrs. Brothers, mother of 
Rev. L. F. Brothers, of Southside, Winston-Sa- 
lem, which occurred at her home at Elizabeth 
City on Thursday, January 28th. Brother 
Brothers will have the sympathy of the whole 
Conference in this deep sorrow. The Sentinel 
in announcing her death says: The deceased 
was a sweet-spirited Christian woman, one 
whose consecration and devotion to her church 
and Master were convincingly felt by those 
who knew her. 

— The Southern Christian Advocate comes in 
new dress from Anderson instead of Greenville. 
The three jmmbers already received indicate 
that the Rev. W. C. Kirkland, the new editor, is 
going to give the two Conferences in South Car- 
olina a paper in every way up to the high stand- 
ard maintained by this paper in its long and 
honorable career. Much of the better aspira- 
tions of our boyhood days came to us through 
the old Southern, when edited by Dr. Kennedy 
and others who wrought well in the field of re- 
ligious journalism in those days. A slight ac- 
quaintance with Dr. Kirkland has drawn the 
heart-strings toward him. and we shall be beside 
him in the spirit of brotherly svmpathy in the 
inevitable" trials into which he has been called. 
The best we can hope for him is that South Car- 
olina Methodists may be as good to him as West- 
ern North Carolina Methodists have been to us. 

— One of the choice spirits of Methodism in 
the Twin-City during the past thirty years 
passed quietly and peacefully away in a hospital 
in Richmond, Va., on January 12th, when the 
soul of Mrs. P. H. Hanes took its flight to the 
better land. Mrs. Hanes had been in delicate 
health for many years and had been a great 
sufferer ; nevertheless, she loved the church ana 
never seemed happier than when extending the 
hospitality of her home to the ministers whom 
she revered as the men of God. With strong 
domestic instincts, she made the inmates of her 
home happy, and in the sphere of a great moth- 
erhood she filled truly the real mission of a 
consecrated woman. The writer shares very 
deeply the bereavement which has come 
to Brother Hanes and his family, and regrets 
that, by oversight, this reference to the depart- 
ure of our d^ar sister did not appear at the 
proper time. 



Lexington — On Sunday, January 21st, the 
Lexington congregation had a great day. The 
Dispatch says: 

Rev. Frank Siler, Missionary Secretary of 
the Western North Carolina Conference of the 
M. E. Church, South, preached two strong ser- 
mons at the Methodist church Sunday morning 
and Sunday night. In spite of bad weather 
large congregations heard him. While here he 
helped to arouse a great deal of missionary en- 
thusiasm in the local church. It was decided 
that the Lexington church woiild support a mis- 
sionary in Korea, beginning at once. Mr. Siler 
said he thought he could arrange to have Rev. 
J. R. Moose, a North Carolinian, now presid- 
Lng elder of the Seoul (Korea) district, assigned 
to the Lexington church. Manv of the people of 
Lexington are acquainted with Mr. Moose and 
they are hoping that they will be able to 
secure him as their representative in Koreai 



Avery Circuit— We have just closed our 
meeting at Jonas Ridge. We had forty-six pro- 
fessions ; about thirty added to the two church- 
es — Methodist and Baptist. It continued six- 
teen days. The Lord was there in great power. 
I did the preaching except three sermons by 
Rev. J. M. Harris, of Morganton. We have a 
good, kind, appreciative people to work with. 
We are praying for a great year on the Avery 
circuit. Brethren, pray for us. 

John H. Green. 



Henrietta- Car oleen — Rev. M. B. Clegg, the 
pastor, writes as follows: 

The brethren of Henrietta-Caroleen charge 
have been exceedingly kind to us since we have 
been here. They gave a royal reception and 
a most generous pounding. We have not miss- 
ed a service on account of the very bad weather 
which has come our way about every Sunday 
since our arrival, except one. The congrega- 
tions have been good. The prayer meetings are 
well attended. The interest in church work 
generally is fine. This speaks well not only of 
these good and loyal people, but also of their 
most excellent former pastor, Rev. J. F. Arm- 
strong. 



Creston Charge — Creston charge is in Ashe 
County. It takes its name from the town which 
lies on the North Fork of New River. The eight 
churches which make up this charge are situ- 
ated on this river and its tributaries. Creston 
church has the best building on the charge. 
The parsonage is also built on their lot. It 
was at this church our first quarterly meeting 
was held. In connection with this meeting a 
revival was held. The pastor started on the 
second Sunday night and was joined Thursday 
night by Rev. J. H. Bennett, the presiding el- 
der, who remained with us one week, preaching 
twice a day. The revival was a success, al- 
though held under unfavorable weather con- 
ditions. Brother Bennett did some great 
preaching while with us. He came a stranger, 
but went away known and loved. Creston 
charge is well pleased with our new presiding 
elder. Yours truly. 

J. I. Hickman. 



Broad River — We had our first quarterly 
conference the 16-17, and we had a fine one. 
Brother Gay, in his usual cheerful way, was a 
great inspiration to both pastor and the board 
of stewards. We had a large number present 
Saturday. We have made our second round on 
our work and have met a kind-hearted, loyal 
people at all our churches. These good peoplt 
believe in taking care of the preacher and his 
family. On Dec. 2 4 , we were very generously 
pounded and our Christmas was made brighter 
from the results thereof. And these good things 
did not all come at one time and then stop, 
but ' ' good things ' ' keep coming often and more 
of them. The prospects with us for a great 
year are evident at all our churches, and we 
hope to make this the best year of our lives. 

May the Lord help us to be a faithful and 
wise leader for these, such dear people. 

H. H. Mitchell. 



Liberty Church, Winston-Salem has come in- 
to the bonfire brotherhood. The Twin-City Sen- 
tinel, of January 30th, says : 

The pastor, Rev. J. S. Hiatt, and the mem- 
bership of Liberty M. E. Church are entitled 
to congratulations. The $1,100 debt on the 
church lot, located on the corner of Liberty 
and Balsley Streets, has been liquidated. The 
note held by one of the local banks is now 
in the possessiou of the pastor and will be de- 
stroyed in a bonfire at a service to be held at 
11 o'clock next Sunday morning. 

Pastor Hiatt deserves the success that has 
crowned his efforts to get rid of the indebted- 
ness held against this house of worship. He 
was told that this was not a good time to 
raise money. To those who entertained and 
expressed such an opinion he replied that taking 
financial subscriptions for anything required 
activity and that he had learned from actual 
exnorionce that the average person never con- 
sidered any time a good one for raising casn. 
He took hold of the arduous task a few weeks 
ago, and, undaunted by any words of discour- 
agement, he refused to permit anything, either 



February 4, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Seven 



by act or word, to discourage him until the 
last dollar had been collected. He and his mem- 
bers duly appreciate the assistance rendered 
by members and friends of other congregations. 

The small but faithful and loyal membership 
of the Liberty church co-operated with the pas- 
tor, and the services next Sunday morning will 
be an occasion for general rejoicing. 

It will be recalled that the debt on Burkhead 
Institutional church was liquidated a few weeks 
ago and that the last note was destroyed by 
fire at an appropriate service held at the church. 



Main Street Reidsville. The congregation of 
Main Street church, Reidsville, occupied their 
new Sunday school annex for the first time 
last Sunday. The Review announcing the open- 
ing gives the following description : This addi- 
tion is heated by steam and lighted by electric- 
ity in a most beautiful way. The main auditori- 
rium has a large gallery, part of which is par- 
titioned into separate class rooms. On the main 
floor there are two large rooms that can, by 
accordion doors, be thrown into the general au- 
ditorium. These two rooms are to be used by 
two organized classes of the Sunday school on 
Sundays, while one of them is to be the ladies 
parlor on week-days. 

In the basement there is a very large room 
which will be used for first time on Sunday by 
the elementary department of the school. There 
the little tots will assemble and have their open- 
ing and closing exercises, as well as the reciting 
of their lessons, separate and distinct from the 
rest of the school. 

There are seven other individual class rooms 
in this basement, not to mention a pantry and 
a room for the organ-blower." 

Mr. R. B. Chance is Superintendent and gave 
a cordial invitation to the people of the city 
to unite with them. We congratulate Brother 
Lambeth and his congregation. They will be in 
good shape for entertaining the Annual Confer- 
ence in November. 



and N.-W. Circuit" — I was appomteu, 
I came ; I am pleased ; I am very busy. The 
charge listed in the Journal as Ozark-Dallas is 
a new work formed by taking the Ozark church 
from Ozark-West End, the Dallas church from 
Dallas-Lowell, and the High Shoals church 
from Stanley Creek, and combining them to 
form a "C. & N.-W. Circuit" (So called because 
the Carolina & Northwestern Railway courte- 
ously furnishes conveyance for the Circuit 
Rider, gratis.) 

The new preacher was kindly received by the 
people, and he and his little family have been 
comfortably domiciled in the home of Brother 
C. C. Cornwell while a parsonage was being 
provided. A nice little cottage, well furnished, 
practically new, and situated on Main Street 
just a block from the church in Dallas has 
been purchased for a parsonage, and will be 
furnished and ready for occupancy in a few 
weeks. 

In spite of the rainy season and a widely 
distributed membership, I have made 160 pas- 
toral visits, lacking less than a dozen of having 
visited every Methodist home in my charge. 
Two immediate results of this campaign of pas- 
toral evangelism have been : a doubling of at- 
tendance at church, and fifty-four accessions to 
the membership. 

The financial budget has been estimated, and 
will be raised quarterly by the stewards. The 
pastor will be well cared for by this wide-awaRe. 
loyal and responsive people. Mav the Lord 
make his ministry to bear much fruit among 
them this year. 

Best wishes to all my brethren. 

fraternally, W. Edgar Poovev. 

Dallas, N. C. 



Advance Charge — We received a. warm wel- 
come to this charge by the good people of 
Advance church. Upon our arrival we found 
automobiles waiting at the depot, and several 
of the people, and soon were carried to the 
parsonage, where we found a good number of 
the folks with a warm house and a splendid 
dinner, and provisions for some time to come 
and since that day good things have continued 
to come. I wrote of our reception immediately 
afterwards but it failed to reach the paper 



some way, so thought I would say something of 
it now. 

We have built a good barn since we got here ; 
indeed it is the best barn I have ever seen at 
a parsonage, and the best barn I know of any- 
where to the size of it. It is only 25x27 feet, 
has three stalls, a corn bin and room for two 
or three buggies, and can drive inside and un- 
hitch when it is raining, and hitch up also in- 
side, feeding currying, milking, all done inside ; 
plenty of room for feed above, and it is built 
of good timber, nearly all heart pine weather- 
boarding and practically no debt on it. 

I closed a three weeks' protracted meeting 
last night which has resulted in quite a revi- 
val. We have had a good number of profes-. 
sions, perhaps between forty and fifty and the 
church is in so much better condition except a 
part of the church that did not attend the 
meeting. It was a good revival. The country 
folks did not many of them get out enough, 
on account of bad roads, etc.. to get the full 
benefits of the meeting and a few in town who 
do not attend church. I have received four 
members and have three or four to receive yet. 
We expect to continue the meetings Wednesday 
evenings and Sundays, and expect to have con- 
versions at these meetings. This is the normal 
condition of the church and we ought at least 
to keep lip to a normal condition. We have 
a good people to serve, a splendid church in 
which to hold our services in Advance, and our 
country churches are comfortable except Cor- 
natzer, where we are building and expect to 
finish the church this year or early next year. 

Respectfully, E. Myers. 



Church Extension Notice 

Application blanks for aid from either the 
General or Conference Board of Church Exten- 
sion may be had by applying to me. I have al- 
so a supply of Church Extension Manuals, a 
copy of which will be sent to any who will drop 
me a card requesting one. 

A. W. Plyler, Secretary. 



Report from Rev. W. L. Dawson 

Rev. W. L. Dawson, Conference Evangelist, 
writes as follows : "We closed a very good meet- 
ing at Walnut Street Thursday night, resulting 
in much good to the church. Several profes- 
sions and some to join the church. I am now 
with Brother J. A. Fry, at Bald Creek. I ex- 
pect to go from here to Bakersville i to be with 
Brother J. P. Morris, and from there to Shoal 
Creek to be with Brother R. F. Mock." 



The Loan Funds 

On New Year's eve I reported a total in 
crease of $84,843.07 in the Loan Fund Capital 
of the Board of Church Extension for the nine 
months of the fiscal year. Twenty days of 
January have brought in twelve contributions, 
the total amount of which is $4,374.76. The 
smallest of these was $1.00 ; the largest. $1,250, 
and there were two of this amount, given by 
two aged women of Maryland to constitute a 
Memorial Loan Fund for their sister. The total 
increase in the Loan Fund Capital for the fiscal 
year to date, January 20, 1915, is $89,217.83. 

We must have the balance, $10,782.17, neces- 
sary to make the $100,000.00 for the fiscal year, 
by March 31st. W. F. McMurry. 

1025 Brook St., Louisville, Ky. 



Great Meeting at Rehobeth 

Prof. Rudd Newsom, the holy and truly use- 
ful man of God, conducted the music for us 
for fourteen days at Rehobeth. God did won- 
derful things for us. Many were reclaimed, 
many saved and several Christians sought and 
received the baptism of the Holy Spirit and are 
now living the more abundant life. Quite a 
large class is to be received into the church. 
People were saved from eight to seventy years 
of age. One young husband is called to preach 
and he and wife are planning to move to some 
college for preparation. 

Today we began in Denver. The devil seems 
to have a branch office in this section, but we 
are expecting God to help us bankrupt his 
headquarters here. Let all the saints pray ear- 
nestly for us, Trustingly, 

Jim Green. 



Important 

This is to notify the friends of temperance, 
who are anxious to see the law to prohibit the 
delivery of liquor for beverage purposes in 
North Carolina passed, that the Anti-Saloon 
League bill looking to this end was introduced 
in the House by Mr. Grier, of Iredell, on Jan- 
uary 28th, and that a hearing before the joint 
committees of the House has been fixed for 
Tuesday, February 9th, at three p. m., in the 
House of Representatives, when both the propo- 
nents and the opponents of the measure will be 
heard. All who desire to appear before that 
committee will take notice and be on hand. 

All who are getting up petitions are urged to 
send them in prior to the committee hearing on 
the 9th, and all who intend writing letters to 
their representatives should do so at the earliest 
possible moment. We are very much encour- 
aged at the headway made so far, but it 
is necessary that every influence that can be 
harnessed be brought to bear upon our General 
Assembly. Do your part. 

R. L. Davis, Supt. 
N. C. Anti-Saloon League. 



Missionary Notes from Field Secretary 

Jan. 28-29, Elkin, J. P. Hipps, P. C— $509.00 
cash and four-year subscriptions Conference 
Mission Special ; $200.00 of this by Capt. G. T. 
Roth, Lutheran. 

Jan. 30, Walkertown, G. C. Brinkman, P. C. 
— $14.00 cash Conference Mission Special. 

Jan. 31-Feb. 1, Advance, E. Myers, P. C. — 
Sunday school at Advance will aid in support 
of Rev. J. W. Frank, of Japan. $246.00 cash 
and four-year subscriptions Conference Mission 
Special. Mr. C. G. Bailey subscribed $200.00 
of this. 

# # # * 

The last Annual Conference asked that as ear- 
ly as possible salaries of married . preachers be 
made not less than $800.00 ; those of single men 
not less than $600.00. An every member can- 
vass with envelope system in every church will 
help to bring this to pass. In meantime let us 
all work together to secure an emergency fund 
for the preachers of the Conference of not less 
than $20,000.00. Brother Bailey, of Advance, 
longs to see better support of the country 
preacher. He lives two miles from railroad. He 
suggests that one hundred men give $50.00 a 
year special for four years to create this fund. 
He and Capt. Roth have led the way. Who will 
be the other ninety-eight 1 136 of our 234 pas- 
tors received last year less than $800.00 from 
the charges served. One man received $22.00. 
Our foreign missionaries are far better sup- 
ported than are those of our Western North 
Carolina Conference. 

» * t 

Each of the three charges visited during week 
have new pastors, all of whom are in high favor. 

Brother Meyers closed at Advance a three 
weeks' series of revival meetings, Jan. 24th, 
with several conversions and additions. This 
congregation moved Sunday night, the 31st, to 
secure for him a gift in money as a token of 
their appreciation of his earnest work. 

Mr. D. C. Moyer, of Walkertown, asked 
Brother Brinkman if he was going iu conduct 
his revival meeting himself or secure some one 
to help him. Receiving the reply that he would 
do his own preaching she suggested to her hus- 
band that they take the $5.00 sometimes given 
the preacher helper and give it to the Confer- 
ence Mission Emergency Fund. Believing, too, 
that the every-member canvass methods being 
introduced by Brother Brinkman would save 
them another $5.00 usually given at end of year 
in the annual tug to bring cnurch out, she 
asked Brother Moyer to make their offering $10- 
.00. He agreed. You see there are ways of do- 
ing the larger things by doing .more and with 
less money at home base. Sister Moyer wants 
to help the preacher's wife by making better 
provision for pastor's support. 

# * * * 

The three pastors greatly aided me in last 
week's work. But such co-operation I find 
everywhere, for which I am deeply gratefuL 



Page Bight 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 4, 1915 



Epworth League Department 



Conducted by Miss A. Stanly Hall, Hickory, N. 0. 



i 



ORGANIZING AND WORKING THE 
RURAL EPOWRTH LEAGUE 

. Rev. P. O. Lowrey, in Epworth Era 

The Methodists have always recog- 
nized the value of the country Church 
and have done well in meeting their 
obligations to the country people. In 
fact, in the early days, when her chief 
religious program was for her itiner- 
ants to "line off" their hymns at the 
monthly appointments and to hold an- 
nual revivals in each congregation, the 
country Church was Methodism's glory. 
And still the larger part of her ministry 
and many of her strongest laymen are 
the products of the rural Church, and 
any tendency to neglect these sons and 
daughters of the soil would be not only 
unwise but equally unjust. That the 
country Church is weak through the 
migration of her strongest and best- 
educated young men and young women 
to the city, thus leaving her with an 
inefficient leadership, is in many cases 
too evident to need argument. But 
rather than justifying the Church in 
neglecting this special field of its oper- 
ations, that in tbe past has been most 
fruitful in members and leaders, this 
very weakness is the surest call to 
make strong her teaching and training 
agencies. That there are few trained 
workers is the greater reason why the 
Sunday school and the Epworth League 
should be persistently used in training 
these for the work that needs to be 
done. That these members of the coun- 
try Church should have the training 
that their position and needs demand, 
our most capable preachers should be 
sent to them as pastors — men who can 
organize and direct the educational and 
training agencies of the Church. For a 
pastor simply "to be one of them" in 
social life and to preach sermons of the 
"small rivulet of exegesis running 
through a broad valley of exhortation" 
type is not sufficient. The demand for 
a strong pastor is in direct proportion 
to the weakness of the leadership in 
the congregation; and the sooner the 
appointing powers and m'ssion boards 
recognize this, the better for the king- 
dom of God. 

Many of these country Churches that 
have been served by untrained pastors 
who simply "filled their appointments" 
monthly and held annually their ten 
days' revivals worship in the same old 
rickety houses that have been in use 
for years, some of them in the South 
without means of heating or windows 
to shut out the wintry winds, and have 
neither teaching nor training agencies 
organized. Of necessity the Christian 
ideals in such a Church are very low, 
and the unharnessed life and the un- 
trained talents among the young of 
these congregations is but little less 
than appalling. It is enough to make 
Edison weep again "at the loss of pow- 
er," as is reported of him when behold- 
ing the unused waters of the great 
ocean that lay before him. 

To assist in leading these young peo- 
ple of brawn and natural moral stam- 
ina into higher religious ideals than 
those which necessitate their being re- 
claimed) at each annual revival meeting 
and then lost sight of for another year, 
and in order to train them for higher 
service in the Church, is the work of the 
Epworth League. Its organization and 
purpose, with its leadership and liter- 
ature, can not be neglected without 
blame upon those who are called "to 
feed the flock of God;" and the more 
difficult the League is to be worked, 
so much greater is the need that this 
should be done. We suggest three es- 
sentials in making this work a success 
in the country or anywhere else: 

1. The regularly held Council mee-t- 
Ing. It Is here that the pastor can do 
most in helping his leaders in their 
work. If he Is not privileged to attend 
with them the various meetings of the 



Chapter, he can at least have a month- 
ly Council with them and with them 
study their problems and assist in 
planning their work. Difficulties can 
usually be overcome in these Council 
meetings, and without them most Lea- 
gues will either die or succeed only in 
some one or more departments that 
may chance to have Superintendents 
capable of succeeding by themselves. 

2. Essential also is the holding reg- 
ularly the monthly business meeting 

No real training work can be carried 
on helter-skelter; it must be done "de- 
cently and in order." The Epworth 
League as an organization has a busi- 
ness side, where all its members have 
a share in the responsibility of its suc- 
cessful management; and to let a few 
of them assume all the responsibility 
or authority that belongs to all is not 
only suicidal to the League but dis- 
tinctly unfair to its members as well. 
If an officer has failed in his work or 
any discouragement has arisen, it is 
in the business meeting that it should 
be corrected. And in a businesslike 
way the officers and chairmen of de- 
partments should be trained to make 
reports of faithful service rendered in 
the offices to which they have been 
called. Without the business meeting 
the League must of necessity be a fail- 
ure, whether in the rich city Church 
or in the humble log meetinghouse. 

3. The regular meeting of the several 
committees is also a matter of no little 
importance. The chairman is not the 
committee, but only its leader, and he 
should assume neither the authority 
nor the responsibility that belongs to 
the whole committee. If he is weak, 
he must have the counsel of his com- 
mittee; if he is strong, he should use 
this meeting for training the members 
in the work of which they are a part. 
Only thus can the wisdom of all and 
the cooperation of all be put into the 
League's enterprises and activities. 

Given a policy of co-operation as laid 
down above, we make the following 
suggestions as to the work of the sever- 
al departments, the sum of which is 
the work of the League: 

1. Let the Superintendent of the De- 
partment of Spiritual Work and his 
committee be composed of devout per- 
sons who will assume the responsibil- 
ity of looking after the spiritual life of 
the League's members, and let them 
have charge of the devotional meetings. 
There should be subcommittees on mu- 
sic, securing attendance, ushers, and 
personal evangelism. The leaders 
should be appointed at least four weeks 
in advance, care being taken to get 
those that are best suited to the several 
subjects. This makes it necessary that 
the subjects be studied in advance and 
that the leaders be carefully selected. 
In case the leader be untrained and 
not familiar with his subject, he should 
be given assistance in making out his 
program, which should in every case be 
written down in definite order, with 
the songs, Scripture readings, recita- 
tions, talks, and testimonies in their 
places. (This program may he varied 
from, but few leaders are safe in trust- 
ing an extempore plan.) 

The time and place of the weekly de- 
votional meeting should depend upon 
local circumstances. It might be well 
to hold it at the regular hours of wor- 
ship on those Sundays when there is no 
preaching service following the Sunday 
school session, or at night, thus giving 
each congregation one teaching and one 
speaking service each Sunday; or it 
might take the place of the midweek 
prayer-meeting, in which case the meet- 
ings might be held from home to home 
in the community. In these meetings 
the aim should be to train the members 
to the devotional study of the Bible, 
In observing the quiet hour, to express 
their religious faith and experience in 
talks and in testimonies, and In the 



Standard Form 
Collection Envelopes 



Western North Carolina Conference 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South 

HOLT'S CHAPEL 



FOR PASTOR'S SALARY 



AMOUNT 



!Njame 



Date. 



191.... 



Dollars Cents 



MISSIONS AND CONFERENCE COLLECTIONS 

Western North Carolina Conference 

Methodist Episcopal Church, South 
MOUNT ZION CHURCH 



Name- 
Date .. 



Dollars 



Cents 



$1.90 for lOOO, delivered 

$1.40 for additional 1000, delivered 
FOR EITHER FORM 



This price is based on using the above forms, changing name of church 
only. The large envelope is manila, and of the quality regularly used for 
Pastor's Salary collections. The small envelope can be furnished in white, 
green or cherry. Its difference in color and size from the Pastor's Salary 
form makes it ideal for Missions and Conference Collections. 

If special form is desired the price will average $2.40 for the first 1000, 
and $1 40 for additional 1000's, delivered. 

Special rates on large quantities. 

The Advocate Press, Greensboro, N. C. 



art of soul-winning, as in the Fellow 
Workers' Covenant. 

2. The Second Department stands 
for Christian service, and its chairman 
and members should be those who will 
strive faithfully to represent the 
League in this" field of endeavor. This 
may be in community service, such as 
visiting the sick, caring for the poor, 
aiding in social betterment, or in the 
work of caring for the local church, 
such as house-cleaning, putting flowers 
on the pulpit, and keeping, the yard in 
order . The League through this com- 
mittee can at times be of service to the 
pastor in raising and distributing the 
benevolent funds of the Church and in 
aiding in the upkeep of the parsonage 
in such ways as painting, screening, or 
furnishing. To do these lines of work 
there may be subcommittees, as in the 
First Department, but the committee 
as a whole should have its regular 
meetings and make its general plans. 

3. The Recreation and Culture Com- 
mittee should aim to take charge of the 
social life of the community and to sup- 
ply everything needed socially by its 
members. Programs should be given 
weekly, biweekly, or, by all means, 
monthlv. Thin committer! rnn also so- 
licit subscriptions to such choice liter- 
ary periodicals as its members should 
read. Good books should be reviewed 
from time to time and be placed in the 



i hands of the members and their liter- 
ary tastes and reading habits devel- 
oped. In carrying out these social fea- 
tures it is often practicable to form cir- 
cuit unions with the other Leagues oi 
the pastoral charge and have joint 
meetings from time to time, using the 
visitors on the programs thus conduct- 
ed; and so not only furnish happy so- 
cial intercourse among the members, 
but also develop them in using their 
literary gitfs on public programs, re- 
peating in the neighboring League 
what has already been used at home. 

4. The Missionary Committee keepo 
in touch with all the missionary agen- 
cies of the church and plans the month- 
ly meetings in time for those taking 
part to make thorough preparation, us- 
ing the various missionary periodicals 
and such maps, charts, and books as 
may be accessible. The pastor's li- 
brary is of value here. Besides this, 
regular mission study classes should 
be conducted from time to time, using 
the prescribed course for Leaguers for 
that year. It is sometimes practicable 
to have returned missionaries or other 
missionary specialists to visit the 
League. To the missionary and benev- 
olent causes the committee should train 
the members to systematic and propor- 
tionate giving, teaching the law of the 

(Continued on Page 9) 



February 4, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Nine 



TRINITY COLLEGE NOTES 

Beginning tomorrow, Sunday even- 
ing, a series of religious meetings will 
be held in the Y. M. C. A. hall, in East 
Duke building, at 12 o'clock noon and 
at 7:30 every evening, continuing for a 
week, the services being conducted by 
Rev. Dr. E. K. McLarty, pastor of Try- 
on Street Methodist Church, Charlotte. 
Dr. McLarty is an alumnus of the col- 
lege, a member of the class of 1895, 
and a preacher of unusual strength. 
The community is fortunate in having 
him conduct these mid-year religious 
services which now for so many years 
have been held regularly following the 
close of the first term's work, and 
which occupy such an important part 
in the religious life of the entire com- 
munity. 

Professor E. C. Brooks, of the de- 
partment of Education, has been elect- 
ed a member of the Durham City 
School Board, to fill the vacancy caus- 
ed by the resignation of General J. S. 
Carr. 

Through the efforts of Dr. William 
E. Boyd, professor of history, a num- 
ber of rare and valuable books on 
North Carolina and Southern history 
have been procured for the library. 
These books were in the collection of 
Mr. William H. Hoyt, of New York 
City, and were only recently purchased 
through Dr. Boyd. They make a val- 
uable addition to the already large 
amount of historical material collected 
here. In the collection recently added 
are: 

"Proceedings of the Friends of Con- 
vention, at a meeting held in Raleigh, 
December, 1822." 

"To the Freemen of Orange County, 
at a meeting of the General Assembly, 
March 18, 1823." 

"The Journal of the Convention as- 
sembled at the city of Raleigh, on the 
Iflth cjf November, 1823, to adopt such 
measures as were decreed necessary 
to procure an amendment to the Con- 
stitution of North Carolina, 1823." 

"The proposed new Constitution of 
the State of North Carolina, as agreed 
upon by the Convention assembled in 
Raleigh on the 16th of November, 1823. 
Together with a copy of the present 
constitution. Raleigh, 1823." 

"Debate on the Convention question, 
in the House of Commons in the Leg- 
islature of North Carolina, December 
18 and 19, 1821, Taken in shorthand 
by Joseph Gales, Raleigh, 1822." 

"Debate on Mr. Fisher's resolution 
against Caucuses in the House of Com- 
mons of North Carolina, in December 
1823. Raleigh, 1824." 

"Debate in the Legislature of North 
Carolina on a proposed appropriation 
for rebuilding the Capitol, and on the 
convention question, in the months of 
December and January, 1831-1832. Ral- 
eigh, 1833." 

"Debate on the convention question, 
House of Commons, January 14, 1832. 
Raleigh, 1832." 

"Statement of the accounts of the 
Banks of North Carolina with the 
State. Raleigh, 1838." 

"Annual report of the Board for In- 
ternal Improvements of North Caro- 
lina to the General Assembly, with a 
condensed view of their accounts from 
the organization of the board, together 
with Mr. Pulton's reports on sundry 
public works. December 5, 1823 (8). 
Raleigh, 1823." 

"Annual report of the Board for In- 
ternal Improvements for North Caro- 
lina to the General Assembly, with a 
statement of their accounts, together 
with Mr. Fulton's reports on sundry 
public works. November 22, 1824. Ral- 
eigh, (No. 2). 

Two annual reports of the Board of 
Public Improvements for the years 1820 
and 1835. 



HOW SHIVAR MINERAL WATER 
RELIEVES RHEUMATISM 

According to the standard medical 
books, Rheumatism is not a germ dis- 
ease but Is the result of Imperfect nu- 



A First $ 
Payment 
of Only 



2 



Puts Into 
Your Home 
These 16 



Indispensable S* Books 



This Splendid Library Forms the Most Remarkable Bible Study Collection at the Most Remarkable Price 
Ever Offered. Our Readers Will Need Them During 1914 as Never Before. 




Less Than Vs Former Prices 



NOW ONLY 




They contain the richest, 
most authoritative treas- 
ures ot fact and commen- 
tary on the Holy Word to 
be found in all sacred lit- 
erature—newly enlarged 
and enriched. Now 16 
volumes. Every Sunday 
School Teacher, Superin- 
tendent, Pastor, Bible Stu- 
dent, Evangelist, and FOR ALL CASH 
Christian Home needs Easy Monthly cip 

these books. Payments Price 9 ■ O 

Cruden's Complete Concordance. LttffiM 

less if you cannot tell where to And them. 756pages. Former Price $1.50 

Jamieson, Fausset, aad Brown's Commentary glj 8 ^ SSTSSSi 

merits, elucidating difficult passages, historical allusions, unfamilar cus- 
toms, and so on; a massive storehouse of authoritative but lurid notes, 
concise but pregnant. 1,380 pages. Former price $9. i 

Smith's Dictionary of the Bible £ stand " d classic -- never super : 



their Smith only less than their Cruden. 
Former Price $4.50. 



All serious Bible users need 
1,024 pages, finely Illustrated. 



Fausset's Critical and Expository Cyclopedia p^lHlcTesf 

articles of enormous variety, condensed yet complete and thorough, 
handling both historical and expositional questions with the highest 
scholarship and grasp. 750 3-column paees, 600 illustrations. Former 
price $5. 



Kitto's Illustrated Bible History 



A brilliant work of immense popu- 
larity, filling up the gaps in the Scrip- 
ture narrative and completing it in a rounded historic unity to the 
destruction of Jerusalem by Titus. 736 2-column pages. 220 illustrations. 
Former price $4.50. 



Edersheim's Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah 0 Vth« 

society, life and intellectual and religious development of Christ's Pales- 
tine, to serve as a background for bis own portrait; by a world famous 
Christian Jewish scholar. 1,524 pages. Former price $6. 



Conybeare and Howson's Life and Epistles of Saint Paul 

of enduring popularity and authority ; a lifelike picture of the great apostle 
and his work, an acute and illuminating commentary on his epistles, with 
a style at once full of fine scholarship and of literary charm. 917 pages; 
many fine illustrations, maps, charts, etc. Former price $4.50. 



Geikie's Hours with the Bible gEiTSTSSS? tft^imES 

with knowledge gathered through wide reading and study and through 
Information obtained first hand— having trateled in Egypt. Syria, and 
throughout every nook and corner of the Holy Land. His graphic explana- 
tion enables every teacher, Bible student and preacher to put the old 
truths in clear, fresh and winning form. 2,110 pages, richly illustrated. 
Former price 86. ■ 



Josephus' Complete Works 

after Christ; History and Antiquities of the Jews; the Roman-Jewish War, 
which stamped out the Jewish nationality in blood and fire, etc. 978 
pages. Former price $4. 



Sanford's Concise Cyclopedia of Religious Knowledge £ e s ™ ln ? 

information regarding Church and Bible History, Names, Places, and 
Customs, Creeds and Sects, the early Church, Story of the Reformation, 
Young People's Societies, Cathedrals, Churches, etc. 985 pages, beauti- 
fully illustrated. Former price 83.50. 



Satisfaction Gi,belfS 3 ' 000 SeleCtf!tl (3UOtatiOI,S -fters. ^fhr^d^efoqu'e^ 

«au9iavuuil passages from the literature of all ages, with complete index of authors 
■ LiiiA . ■ and subjects. Undenominational, but evangelical. 681 pages. Former 

Absolutely Guaranteed price $2. 



Eyery book newly 
made and handsomely 
bound in cloth. Aver- 
age size of volumes 



Monthly Payment Prices 



Complete Set) 


1G Volnmeu 


$18.00 


Choice of 


13 




16.00 


Choice of 


10 


M 


14.00 


Choice of 


8 


M 


12.0'j 


Choice of 


6 


H 


10.MI 


Choice of 


4 




8.00 


Choice of 


■ 


H 


4.00 



Cash Prices 

16 Volumes, $16.00 

13 * 18.00 

10 " 12.00 

8 " 10.00 

6 * 8.00 

4 «' 6.00 

2 " 8.60 



Money cheerfully re- 
funded if books are 
not entirely satisfac- 
tory. 



How to Order 



On the Monthly Payment Plan we require $2.00 with order, and your promise to pay $1.00 monthly thereafter 
for 16 months. Rooks forwarded at once on receipt of cash price or first installment of $2.00. Customers pay 
freight or express charges. Customers at remote points or in foreign countries desiring us to prepay will send 
30c. per volume to cover cost of postage or express. Safe delivery guaranteed to any station in the country or to any mail point in the world. 
We will take back books that are not satisfactory in ten days after examination and return money, deductingonly the return transportation 
charges. As to our reliability, we refer you to the publisher of this paper or to any commercial agency. Established 1866. 

mm s. s. scranton CO., Publishers, 1 18 Trumbull St., Hartford, Conn. 



tritiori. The food is either imperfectly 
digested or imperfectly assimilated. 
Poisons accumulate and these irritate 
and inflame the delicate linings of the 
joints, the heart and other organs. To 
cure Rheumatism it is therefore nec- 
essary to stop the formation of these 
poisons and get rid of those already 
formed. 

The celebrated Shivar Mineral Wa- 
ter acts on the stomach and kidneys. 
It corrects the digestion and washes 
out the poisons through the kidneys. 
This is the opinion of physicians who 
prescirbe it. If you suffer with rheu- 
matism, dyspepsia, indigestion, gall 
stones, disease of the kidneys, bladder 
or liver, uric acid poisoning, or any 
condition due to impure blood, read 
the following letter, then sign it, en- 
close the amount and mail it. Only 
two out of a hundred, on the average, 
report no benefit. 
Shivar Spring, 

Box 5M, Shelton, S. C. 
Gentlemen : 

I accept your guarantee offer and 



enclose herewith two dollars for ten 
gallons of Shivar Mineral Water. I 
agree to give it a fair trial, in accord- 
ance with instructions contained in 
booklet you will send, and if it fails 
to benefit my case you agree to refund 
the price in full upon receipt of the 
two empty demijohns which I agree to 
return promptly. 

Name 

Address 

Shipping Point 

(Please write distinctly.) 
Note: — The Advertising Manager of the 
North Carolina Christian Advocate is per- 
sonally acquainted with Mr. Shivar. You 
run no risk whatever in accepting his of- 
fer. I have personally witnessed the re- 
markable curative power of this Water In 
a very serious case. 



worth League Board, as the Africa Spe- 
cial for 1914-15. 

These general plans for the Epworth 
League apply to the country as well as 
to the town. If it be hard to carry 
them out, so much the greater is the 
need that the effort should be made. 
The way for the Church to get efficient 
leaders is to make them, and the Hip- 
worth League is the training school of 
the Church. If any one has a better 
way, let him produce it; if not, let him 
work the one the Church has provided, 
and in doing so he will not only help 
his own Church but will constantly be 
sending trained workers into other 
Churches as well. 

Kentwood, La. 



EPWORTH LEAGUE DEPARTMENT 

(Continued from Page 8) 



tithe as the minimum standard of 
Christian duty. Each chapter should 
espouse the cause fostered by the Ep- 




THE CELEBRATED 

Throneburg Nursery 

solicits your trade on apple, 
poach, pear, shade and'orria- 
rnental trees; Prices reasonable. 
Agents wanted everywhere. Liberal commis- 
sions, the THRONES'JRO NURSERY, NEWTON, N. 0, 



Page Ten 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 4, 1915 



Department of Woman's Work 

Conducted ly Mrs. W. R. Harris, Asheville, N. v& 
ENOUGH 

"My grace is sufficient" 2 Cor. 12:9 
Enough when days are dark and drear, 

Enough when shadows fall; 
Thy grace will then sufficient be, 

Dear Lord, to meet them all. 

Enough when morning dawns most 
bright, 

Whene'er the sun shines clear, 
Enough to keep my feet aright, 
E'en with temptation near. 

Enough when pleasure beckons on, 

From duty's path to lead, 
Enougn to comfort in distress, 
Enough for every need. 

Thy grace, not mine, O Christ divine, 

Through life enough will be, 
Enough to guide my feeble bark, 

Across life's changeful sea. 

Enough whene'er the voyage is o'er, 

And all our harbors past, 
Into the haven of sweet rest, 

To bring me home at last. 

Mrs. E. M. Anderson. 

Bradentown, Fla. 



THIRD ANNUAL MEETING, WOM- 
AN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 
W. N. C. CONFERENCE 

In response to a most cordial invi- 
tation from the Woman's Auxiliaries 
of the various Methodist Churches in 
Charlotte, the third annual session of 
the Woman's Missionary Society of 
the W. N. C. Conference convened in 
Tryon Street Church, on Friday, Jan- 
uary 29th, 1915. Surely there could 
not have been a more delightful place 
found for this annual gathering of our 
missionary workers than this progres- 
sive, wide-awake, beautiful citv of 
Charlotte, "the Queen City of North 
Carolina." 

Lavish in their hospitality the hos- 
tesses of the Conference left nothing 
undone for the pleasure and comfort 
of their guests. 

More than 150 delegates were in at- 
tendance and prominent visitors who 
added greatly to the pleasure and 
profit of the occasion were: Mrs. 
Hume R. Steele, Educational Secretary 
of the Board of Missions; Miss Leila 
Tuttle, of McTyeire School, Shanghai, 
China; Miss Frank Miller, Deaconess 
of Winston-Salem; Rev. Frank Siler, 
Missionary Secretary W. N. C. Con 
ference; Mr. W. R. Lynch, Welfare 
Worker, Spray, N. C, and Bishop 
James Atkins, of Waynesville, N. C. 

With the conference of District Sec- 
retaries and executive meeting on Fri 
day afternoon and the formal intro 
ductory service on Friday evening, the 
Conference was inaugurated. At the 
opening service, after an inspiring 
anthem by the choir and devotional 
services by the pastor, Rev. E. K. Me 
Larty, who also extended to the Con 
ference a most cordial welcome to 
Charlotte in behalf of the missionary 
workers and Charlotie Methodism, Mrs. 
Lucy H. Robertson, President Emerit- 
us of Greensboro College for Women, 
who for twenty-five years, by her wise 
leadership as President of the Confer- 
ence, has been an inspiration to the 
workers of the W. N. C. Conference, 
gave her annual address. This ad- 
dress, which was a brief and concise 
recapitulation of the work that has 
been achieved during the past year, 
was full of interesting information to 
the large congregation that filled the 
church. 

A most interesting "Financial Sur- 
vey," covering the money matters of 
the foreign department of the society, 
was given by Mrs. P. N. Peacock, of 
Salisbury, Treasurer of this depart- 
ment. The absence of Mrs. R. L. 
Hoke, Treasurer of home department, 
was regretted. 

Following the program a social hour 



was enjoyed, a time at which old ac- 
quaintances were revived and new 
ones formed. Refreshments were 
served during the evening by repre- 
sentatives from the young people's 
societies. 

Saturday morning after devotional 
services by Mrs. Robertson, the re- 
ports of the various Conference of- 
ficers were given. These annual mes- 
sages from the leaders, those to whom 
we look especially to plan our work 
and from whom we get many valuable 
suggestions and splendid | ideas, are 
always a most interesting feature of 
our Conferences and each officer is 
heard with the closest attention, as 
she reviews the work of the past year 
and lays plans for a successful carry- 
ing forward of our "King's Business" 
for the coming year. 

Interspersing these reports were 
soul-stirring missionary songs by the 
Conference and especially beautiful 
was the vocal duet "Little Church in 
the Wildwood," sweetly sung by the 
handsome manly little sons of Rev. 
and Mrs. McLarty. 

Saturday afternoon Miss Frank Mil- 
ler was the leader of the devotional 
service, and the reports of the District 
Secretaries were read. These reports 
were encouraging, shoving for the 
most part gains overcast year. It 
was most gratifying to have such a 
large number of District Secretaries 
present at the meeting. Never per- 
haps before have our business sessions 
been so full of interest. 

It has been the custom of our Con- 
ference to hold the memorial services 
on Sunday afternoon, but varying from 
this custom the noon hour on Satur- 
day was made an hour of consecra- 
tion service and tributes were paid to 
those of our workers who have "pass- 
ed from earth to heaven" since our 
last meeting at Hendersonville. Espe- 
cialy beautiful were tile memoirs to 
Mrs. W. L. Nicholson, and Mrs. J. J. 
Crow, who were so long and so closely 
identified with our work. These trib- 
utes so expressive of our sorrow and 
our bereavement were Cead by Mrs. 
W. W. Hagood and' 1 ' Mrs. L. N. 
Presson. 

Sunday morning the large audito- 
rium of Tryon Street Church was fill- 
ed to its capacity to hear the splendid 
sermon by Bishop James Atkins, of 
Waynesville. He chose as his text 
the first twelve verses of the 47th 
chapter of Ezekiel — the vision of the 
holy waters. 

Comparing this vision to the un- 
folding of God's Kingdom, he traced 
the growth of the missionary work 
from its beginning with Robert Mor- 
rison and his one convert to Chris- 
tianity during the first six years of 
his labors to its present status. "Its 
growth had been wonderful and its 
prospects are as bright as .God's prom- 
isees," quotting Morrison. 

His message was full of encourage- 
ment to those engaged in this great 
work of the world's redemption. 

There is no service held during our 
annual meetings which is of greater 
interest than the children's service 
which is usually held on Sunday after- 
noon. All the world loves the inno- 
cence and simplicity of childhood. So 
it was not a surprise that the church 
was filled to hear the children of the 
various societies who, under the lead 
ership of their lady managers, acquit 
ted themselves so creditably. What a 
beautiful sight to see two hundred 
children all dressed in white ranging 
from the tiny little tot of the Baby 
Division to the fourteen-year boy and 
girl comprising the Juniors! How in- 
spiring it was! The following pro- 
gram was given: 

Onward, Christian Soldiers, 

Prayer — Jack Spencer^ 1 "" 



Address of Welcome — Jack Mont- 
gomery. 

Duet— The Whole World— Ruth Dil- 
lon and Annie May Hayes. 

Reading — I Grow — Helen Dooley. 

Song — Lillian Lineberger. 

Pantomime — Abide With Me — Patsy 
Gattis. 

Duet — Sarah and Elizabeth Ledwell. 

Purity, Fidelity and Service — Cald- 
well, Hoyle, Irma Wilkinson, Elizabeth 
Whitlock. 

Duet — -James and Furman McLarty. 

Readings — Mildred Blackburn and 
Susie Thomas. 

Solo — Just a Pansy— Connie Butts. 

Duet — Grace Sherrill and Mary Da- 
vis. 

Chorus— Whole Wide World. 
Reading— Amelia Galloway. 
Address — Miss Buttrick. 
Solo — Miss Yung We Tsung. 
Address — Miss Tuttle. 
Chorus — Joy to the World. 



Friends of Mrs. V. L. Stone, District 
Secretary of the Asheville District 
will sympathize deeply with her in the 
death of her sister, Mrs. S. S. Taylor, 
of Jamestown, N. Y., which occurred 
on Saturday, January 23rd, following 
an illness of only a few days. May 
God comfort the aged parents, sisters 
husband and daughter who feel so 
keenly the loss of a loved one. 



NEW OFFICERS 

Centenary Church, Winstton-Salem 

President, Mrs. J. K. Norfleet; 1st 
vice-president, Mrs. E. L .Bain; 2nd 
vice-president, Mrs. J. F. Griffith; su 
perintendent of mission study and 
publicity, Mrs. R. L. Castin; superint- 
endent of social service, Mrs. C. F 
Lowe; superintendents of supplies, 
Mrs. P. R. Masten and Mrs. W. L. 
Ferrell; corresponding secretary, Mrs. 
J. J. Gentry; recording secretary, Mrs. 
A. H. Medearis; treasurer, Mrs. H. B 
Pulliam; agents Voice, Mrs. Felix 
Crutchfield and Mrs. W. P. Hill. 
Calvary Church, Charlotte, N. C 
President, Mrs. R. S. Howie; 1st 
vice-president, Mrs. W. F. Holmes; 2nd 
vice-president, Mrs. Lillian Harnandez; 
corresponding secretary, Mrs. George 
Dooley; treasurer, Mrs. C. F. Shuman. 

Mills River 

President, Miss Hattie Posey; 1st 
vice-president, Mrs. Dr. Greenwood; 
2nd vice-president, Mrs. T. L. Johnson 
superintendent of mission study and 
publicity, Mrs. R. F. Hunnicutt; super 
intendent of social service, none re- 
ported; superintendent of supplies 
Mrs. Dr. Johnson; corresponding sec 
retary and treasurer, Mrs. W. F. Cath 
ey; recording secretary, Mrs. Floyd 
Osborne. 

Franklin 

President, Mrs. A. S. Bryson; 1st 
vice-president, Mrs. S. L. Rogers; 2nd 
vice-president, Mrs. Hattie Jones; su 
perintendent of mission study and pub- 
licity, Mrs. R. H. Daugherty; superint- 
endent of social service, Mrs. R. H 
Daugherty; superintendent of supplies 
Miss Irene Weaver; recording secre 
tary, Mrs. F. S. Johnston; correspond 
ing secretary, Mrs. Estena G. Bidwell; 
treasurer, Mrs. James Gurney; agent 
Voice, Mrs. Estena Bidwell. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas, Our Heavenly Father in 
His infinite wisdom has seen fit to 
take unto himself our beloved sister 
Mrs. William McKee, be is resolved: 

First, That we, the members of 
the Womans Missionary Society of 
Franklin, bow in humble submission 
to Him who doeth all things well. 

Second, That in her death the so 
ciety has lost a consecrated member 
who had all the attributes of a lovable 
Christian character. 

Third, That we earnestly endeavor 
to emulate her example, in reverance 
for the Father and for the Holy Bible 
and also her beautiful Christian 
graces and virtues. 

Fourth, That a copy of these reso- 
lutions be sent to the bereaved hus- 



band, the Franklin Press and the Wo 
man's Page in the North Carolina 
Christian Advocate, and that a copj 
be also spread upon the records of the 
society. 

Mrs. S. L. Rogers, 
Mrs. A. S. Bryson, 
Mrs. F. S. Johnson. 



MILLS RIVER AUXILIARY 

From Mrs. R. F. Hunnicutt, super 
intendent of publicity, comes the fol 
lowing account of a most enjoyable 
meeting of the Mills River auxiliary: 

On Thursday morning January 7th 
1915, the members of the missionary 
society came laden with baskets tc 
the parsonage, where they had planned 
to hold an all-day meeting. The din 
ing table was laden with the manj 
good things and after they had en 
joyed this feast of tempting edible; 
and the .pleasant intercourse of the 
minister's family who were the invitee 
guests, they found that the pantry hac 
been replenished sufficiently to last 
several days. 

Assembling in the parlor of the pas 
tor's home, the afternoon was given 
over to the missionary meeting. The 
subject of the program being "The 
Steward and the Day of Opportunity.' 
Interesting papers and talks relative 
to the subject were given. We neec 
to know more fully what the day of 
opportunity means, and to strengther 
by our thoughts, prayers and help the 
undertakings for the advancement of 
Christ's Kingdom. We want a broad 
er vision of the needs and hope dur 
ing the year to be enabled to do more 
than we have ever done before in 
this great cause. 

An important feature of the meet- 
ing was the election of officers. Be- 
cause of the faithful and untiring ser- 
vices of the former officers as many 
as would consent to serve were re- 
elected. 

We are beginning to plan for tak 
ing up some course of mission iltudy. 
It has been deemed advisable by 
some of the members, that during the 
winter season, while the evenings are 
long, we might have a circulating li- 
brary, each member purchasing a mis- 
sionary book to be read by all the 
members. In this way, not only would 
we read about missions, but this plan 
would form a nucleus for a mission- 
ary library. 

We want to make this a great mis 
sionary year at Mills River, and dc 
all we can for the upbuilding of His 
Kingdom. 



A WORD FROM THE SUPPLY DE 
PARTMEN OF THE WOMAN'S 
MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

Mrs. J. H. Yarborough, Superintendent 

The terrible war which has lastec 
so many years has devastated Mexico 
so that her people have become im 
poverished and many have come tc 
America, not only to avoid the hor 
rors of war, but to secure some em 
ployment by which they may have 
bread and clothing. 

The condition of our own country 
as a result of the European war, has 
made it near impossible for these peo 
pie to secure work. "As a result, there 
are thousands of poor starving Mexi 
cans on our borders. Many of these 
people have come from the tropics 
and the high altitude of Arizona anc 
New Mexico causes them to suffer in 
tensely with the cold. 

Repeated appeals for boxes of warn 
clothing have come to my office; ant 
while our Woman's Missionary Coun 
cil authorizes boxes to be sent througl 
the auxiliaries, only to ministers, ou) 
own mission schools and settlements 
ve make an exception in this instance 
because of the dire suffering of thesi 
people. The call comes especially fron 
the Pacific Coast. 

Auxiliaries or individuals that fini 
it possible, are urged to send warn 
clothing (particularly bed-clothing 
blankets, quilts, as well as clothes fo 
men, women and children) to our mlt 



February 4, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Eleven 



sionary at Nogales, for distribution. 
Send to 

Rev. Jose Thacker, 
Nogales, Arizona, 

The auxiliaries that send these boxes 
must report the same through their 
Conference Superintendent of Supplies 
who will include it in her report for 
1915 to my office. 

We trust that we may be able to 
send relief to these suffering people 
immediately. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas, Aur Heavenly Father in 
His infinite love and wisdom has seen 
best to take from us our dear friend 
and co-worker, Mrs. Jessie Morrow Ta- 
tum, be it therefore resolved: 

First, That we, the members of the 
Woman's Missionary Society and the 
Ladies' Aid Society of First Methodist 
Church, Salisbury, bow in submission 
to the will of Him who doeth all things 
well. 

Second, That in her death we have 
lost a faithful and consecrated mem- 
ber, and have sustained an irreparable 
loss. 

Third, That we shall strive daily to 
emulate her Godly life, as she so beau- 
tifully lived in her home, as a devoted 
wife and mother, and in her church as 
a loyal member. 

Fourth, To the loved ones who are 
so sorely bereaved, especially the hus- 
band and family, we offer our tender- 
est and deepest sympathy. We are 
truly thankful for the privilege of hav- 
ing known her, and we are grieved that 
she has been taken from us. 

Fifth, That a copy of these resolu- 
tions be sent to the bereaved family, 
placed upon the minutes of our Society, 
also sent to the Christian Advocate 
for publication. 

(Signed) Mrs. J. W. Moores. 

Mrs. T. E. Conley. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT AND 
SYMPATHY 

Since God who doeth all things well 
has removed from the Church Militant 
to the Church Triumphant our ex-su- 
perintendent of long service, Dr. J. T. 
Johnson: 

Resolved therefore, that we humbly 
submit to the will of God who doth 
make no mistakes. The whole school 
recognized in him an example or right 
living — a kind father, an excellent 
neighbor, a faithful church worker, and 
a benevolent man to the poor and 
needy, indeed, a man of God has been 
taken away from us, nor do we mourn, 
for we feel sure he has his reward for 
his faithful service during a long life. 

Resolved that these resolutions be 
spread upon the Sunday school min- 
utes of the church, and a copy to each 
of our city weeklies, the Christian Ad- 
vocate and a copy to the family of the 
deceased. 

G. W. Hahn, Chairman, 
W. H. Nicholson, 
W. A. Rudasill. 



SOUTH MAIN STREET, SALISBURY 

The Baraca class of South Main 
Street M. E. Church donated an of- 
fering Sunday in behalf of the needy 
in our community. This class is doing 
a good work and is always ready and 
willing to help a worthy cause when 
called upon. 

The Sunday school at South Main 
Street Methodist Church is still in- 
creasing in number. There were two 
hundred and fifty-two present last Sun- 
day, despite the inclement day. 

A large and attentive audience heard 
the excellent Baraca sermon last Sun- 
day morning in South Main Street 
Methodist Church, delivered by Rev. 
C. F. Sherrill. At the close of the ser- 
vice all the senior and junior Baracas 
Stood up numbering over one hundred 
that were present. 

The evening service was well at- 
tended despite the Inclement weather. 
Rev. C. F. Sherrill preached on "Chris- 
tian Homes." 



GREENSBORO COLLEGE PORWOMEN 




»EW DORMITORY - FITZGERALD ttALL ENTRANCE. TO CAMPUS 

The A-Grade College of the Two Methodist 
Conferences of North Carolina 

Chartered 1838. Confers the degree of A. B. in the literary department, and B. M. in 
the music department. 

In addition to our regular classical course, and preparatory department open to students 
having completed the eighth grade, special attention is called to the departments of Home 
Economics, Expression, Business, Art, Education, Sunday School Teacher Training, Piano 
Pedagogy, and to our complete School of Music which has steadily grown into one of the 
highest excellence in our country. m 

Fall term opens September 8th, 1915. For further information apply to 

REV. S. B, TURRENTINE, A. M., D..D., PRESIDENT, GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Is Any Upright Piano Worth $500 




YES! But only if it sells for $500. Not 
if it is quoted at $500 and sold for 
$238. There are many pianos sold 
at $500 and over. 

Weaver Pianos 




are sold at from $400 for a fine upright up 
to $850 for the finest Grand because discrim- 
inating buyers know they are worth those 
prices. The fact that those who know most about pianos buy the most expensive instruments is the best proof we 
know of that cheap pianos are not satisfactory to the best musicians. 

THE WEAVER PIANO is a Work of Art 

A real treasure in the home of refinement and musical culture. The new art catalogue of the Weaver Piano 
contains much information that is valuable. Send for it (free) if interested in the purchase of a fine piano. 

OLD INSTRUMENTS TAKEN IN EXCHANGE 
TIME PAYMENTS. DISTANCE NO OBSTACLE 

WEAVER ORGAN & PIANO CO. 



MANUFACTURERS 



YORK, PENNSYLVANIA 



SWAT THE FLY POISON PERIL 

Of forty-seven cases of arsenical 
poisoning of children reported from 
fifteen, states from July to October, 1914, 
in thirty-four the children were three 
years old or less. In thirty-seven the 
children had drunk poisoned water 
from a saucer containing fly paper. 
In eight cases the children were poi- 
soned by sucking the wicks in tin re- 
ceptacles containing arsenic, sugar and 
water. In two cases the children were 
poisoned by sucking a sponge used to 
moisten these wicks in poisonous fly 
destroyers. 

The Similarity of the symptoms of 
arsenical poisoning to those of cholera 
infantum make It quite certain that 
there ate a great many more cases 
than are reported! Cholera Infantum, 



one of the most common ailments of 
very young children, is prevalent at 
the time these poisonous fly killers are 
most used. 

Most of the children are too young 
to tell the cause of their illness and 
unless seen taking the poison, arsen- 
ical poisoning may not be suspected. 

Arsenical fly killers are commonly 
placed within the reach of young chil- 
dren. As sugar is used with the arsen- 
ic for the purpose of drawing the flies, 
the arsenical fly killers in whatever 
form are extremely dangerous to chil- 
dren. Many more deaths are caused 
by them than were caused by the phos- ; 
Ichorous match, which practically has 
tyeen abolished because of the fatalities ' 
td children, .No deadly poison is so; 
commonly put within the reaeh nf ohil- j 



dren as is arsenic for killing flies. 

As there are effective and safe meth- 
ods of killing flies there is no excuse 
for using poisonous fly killers of any 
kind. The use in the home of poisons 
of any kind is dangerous but all other 
poisons combined do not present the 
same dangers to children as do the 
poisonous fly killers. The little ones 
should be protected from this really 
grave and exceedingly common dangar. 



An old couple were walking down 
Main Street one day, looking at tl"e 
signs. They ran across one which the 
old man read: "John's Sh rj Stoore 
"Well, I declare!" said the old lad ■ 
"I wonder who tore it, and what do 
they want to tell people about it for? 
fian't hta wife mend It?"--- Exchange, 



Page Twelve 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 4, 1915 



The Sunday School Lesson 



i*4 "M"t"i"t"!"I"H 

FIRST QUARTER— LESSON VI 
FEBRUARY 7, 1915 




RUTH CHOOSES THE TRUE GOD 
Ruth 1 



Golden Text — Thy people shall be 
my people, and thy God my God. Ruth 
1. 16. 



Summary of the Lesson 

! A distinguished Scottish preacher 
and writer has described the book of 
Ruth as a very original kind of love 
story. Most love stories tell of a young 
man's devotion to a young woman. 
This love story tells of the devotion 
of a young woman to her mother-in- 
law. Naomi had lost her husband and 
her sons in a foreign land. She pre- 
pared to return, a lonely widow, to the 
land' of her fathers. She had no claim 
on the two young women whom her 
sons had married in Moab. With gen- 
tle dignity and affection she wished 
them well and bade them adieu as she 
set out on her journey to the land of 
Judah. Both offered to accompany her. 
With sad and kindly raillery, and yet 
with firmness in her tone, she bade 
them go to their own people, while 
she pursued her solitary way. One of 
them obeyed. The other absolutely 
refused. Ties of love which could not 
be broken bound Ruth to Naomi. She 
was ready to change her home, her 
people and her religion at the com- 
mand of this powerful human devotion. 

The Woman Who Lost Everything 

An old Greek story tells of the lady 
Niobe and her seven sons and seven 
daughters and of all her pride in their 
beauty. Her thoughtless boasting 
words angered the lady Leto, the moth- 
er of Apollo, and so it came to pass 
that arrows from the bow of Phoebus 
Apollo slew the seven sons and the 
seven daughters of the lady Niobe. The 
terrible grief of the bereft mother left 
her lifeless, and turned to stone by 
her grief she sat through the long 
years a monument of mourning for 
the beautiful children whom the strong 
and angry Apollo had slain. 

Naomi appears before us in the 
character of a woman of sorrows. Fa- 
mine had driven her husband, her two 
sons and herself away from their own 
land, and in the midst of a strange 
country the husband and the sons had 
died. Then it was that the light of the 
world went out for Naomi. There 
were still duties to be performed, and 
with the composure and self-control 
of one who has no fears, because the 
world has done its worst and there is 
no hope which can be disappointed, 
she set about arranging for the jour- 
ney back to Judah. 

It is quite clear that Naomi was a 
woman of much power to rouse affec- 
tion as well as of much strength of 
character. She had won the devotion 
of the two young women of Moab 
whom her sons had married, and they 
clung to her because they loved her. 
She had not allowed race prejudice to 
make her cold and harsh. She had 
treated them as daughters for whom 
she cherished a real affection, and they 
had given her a place which is won 
only by those who have the gift of un- 
derstanding sympathy and love. Hu- 
man ties had a real meaning to her, 
as well as ties of race. Unconsciously 
she had grown into a woman of larger 
sympathy and deeper understanding 
because of her sojourn in a foreign 
land. She longed to spend the last 
days of her empty life in the spot 
where once she had been a proud, glad 
mother. 

The Woman Who Gave Everything 

A traveler of varied experience in 
many lands once stood before a strik- 
ing picture. The traveler was a wom- 



an of wealth, to whom life had brought 
many disillusioning experiences. At 
times she was tempted to be self-cen- 
tered and synical. The picture reveal- 
ed a stretch of beach, with the waves 
of the ocean beating against it. In the 
foreground stood the figure of a wom- 
an. She seemed a part of the land- 
scape. The dull gray sky, the hostile, 
restless sea, the strange and sinister 
loneliness of the beach and the solitary 
woman seemed to tell one story of 
the emptiness of life. Beneath the 
picture was the word, "Forsaken." It 
suddenly came to the dealthy, traveler 
that there were lives as empty as that, 
lives embittered and solitary beyond 
any personal meaning which these 
words had for her, lives to Which she 
could bring the gift of a tender and 
understanding friendliness. She had 
been seeking what the world could give 
her and had been disappointed. Now 
she would seek what she could give to 
the world, and a sudden deep intuition 
told her that so she would find satisfac- 
tion and inner rest. She stood long 
before the picture. Healing waves of 
sympathy swept over her own life. 
She went out to find a new world be- 
cause of a secret which she carried in 
her own heart. 

As Ruth looked at Naomi, all ready 
to go on her lonely journey, there 
came to the young woman of Moab a 
compelling sense of the terrible isola- 
tion, the controlled suffering of the wo- 
man she loved. Could she allow Naomi 
to go alone, staggering under her bur- 
den, even while she tried so bravely to 
carry herself with poise and self-com- 
mand. Ruth forgot all about herself. 
She thought only of this sad woman, 
and she knew that she must go with 
her, to kindle some blaze of affection 
in her desolate life and to keep it burn- 
ing. She must give up her own people. 
She must give up her own religion. 
She must break a thousand clinging 
ties of girlhood. She must go from the 
land which seemed a part of herself, 
and all this she would gladly do for 
the sake of the woman whom she could 
not bear to think of as alone. With 
Ruth Naomi might be sad, but she 
would never be forsaken. Together the 
two would fight the battle of life. To- 
gether they would meet whatever the 
future might bring. 

The Service of Love 

Love is the philosopher's stone which 
turns all life's experiences into gold. 
In the twelfth century a rude building 
in the valley of Clairvaux, in France, 
seemed the very spot where heaven 
touchd earth, because here the heav- 
enly minded Bernard lived his life of 
amazing devotion and taught his monks 
to sense the divine presence in the 
midst of the greatest privation and 
the sternest mastery of all natural de- 
sires. The travelers who visited Clair- 
vaux did not remember the rude quar- 
ters of the monks. They remembered a 
pervading devotion, which was like a 
perpetual heavenly light, and the world 
seemed an empty spot after a man had 
been at Clairvaux. 

The life of Ruth and Naomi was nar- 
row and cramped enough when the land 
of Judah was reached. To be the com- 
panion of a broken-hearted woman, in 
whose eyes there smiled no light of 
hope, was not an enliving occupation 
to a young woman in the full bloom 
of health and beauty, and poverty and 
privation made the experience more 
acutely difficlt, but Ruth did not move 
about restlessly. She did not rebel 
against the consequences of her choice. 
With gentle serenity she went about 
her tasks! Love transformed the whole 
situation. She was content to be with 
Naomi. She was glad of the opportu- 
nity of serving her. She was constant- 
ly busy doing all that the insight of 
affection suggested to lighten the 
weight of sorrow resting on Naomi. Be- 
cause she had forgotten herself in serv- 



ing another there was a gentle radi- 
ance all over her sky. 

The Reward of Love 

There is a little gate called sacrifice 
through which multitudes have passed 
to bewildering experiences of happi- 
ness and joy. The artist who writes 
the meaning of their selfishness and 
sin, of their devotion and tenderness, 
in delicate lines upon the faces of men 
and women was very busy in these 
days with the face of Ruth. Frederic 
Lawrence Knowles once published a 
volume of poems entitled Love Trium- 
phant. We may take these words from 
his volume and use them to describe 
the luminous face of Ruth when her 
spontaneous devotion to Naomi had 
written its story upon her countenance. 
There was some subtle distinction of 
generosity, some fine grace of self- 
forgetfulness, which she unconsciously 
carried with her wherever she went. 

This it was which attracted the at- 
tention of the rich farmer Boaz, who 
had already been interested in the story 
of Ruth's devotion to Naomi. This it 
was which made a new world open to 
Boaz and to Ruth as together they dis- 
covered the meaning of a home with 
truth and sincerity and self-forgetful 
devotion as its foundation. The re- 
ward of love was the creation of more 
love, and the woman who thought she 
had sacrificed all found that instead 
she had gained all. She was incorpora- 
ted into the deepest meaning of the life 
of the people to whom she had gone 
with Naomi. She had found a home, 
a religion and a destiny far beyond any- 
thing of which she would even have 
dared to dream. 

The last glimpse we have of Naomi 
is memorable and beautiful. She 
stands holding a little child. This tiny 
boy has cleared the shadows from her 
face. He has brought the light of hope 
again to her eyes. She is no more for- 
saken or desolate. Her heart is filled 
with gladness as she cares for the 
child of Ruth. — Lynn H. Hough, D.D., 
in N. Y. Christian Advocate. 



TREE PLANTING TIME 

The last half of February is a good 
time for spring planting. Do not wait 
too long; other things can wait, but 
not this. Get your order in at once. 

Apples, Pears, Peaches, Plums, 
Grapes, Berries, Pecans; complete as- 
sortment ripening through the season. 
Also Flowering Shrubs, Roses, etc., to 
make the home ground attractive for 
the children. 

Some special bargains in surplus ap- 
ple and peach in lots of 300 and over 
for spring shipment. 

HOWARD NURSERY CO., 
Box K210 Stovall, N. C. 



FREE— TWELVE PLANS FOE 
BEAUTIFYING THE HOME 
These are plans actually used by « 
number of Southern home-owners in the 
arrangement of trees, vines, shrubbery, 
etc., around their homes. The beautiful 
effect secured is clearly shown in hand- 
somely made photographs. These plans, 
and many other good ideas on home 
planting, are contained in a little book, 
"Simple Plantings for Southern Homes" 
which is being distributed free by the J. 
Van Lindley Nursery Co., Box H 203, 
Pomona, IN. C The plans are very sim- 
ple, require little work and expenditure, 
and can be followed easily by every home 
owner. You will find this book very in- 
teresting and valuable. Write the nur- 
sery today for a copy. Ask for their 
latoat ca!aloo:ue, which gives full infor- 
mation on the, care ot trees and plant? 




Standard 

Memorial 

Windows 

Made in High Point 

Beautiful In d o s i g n— 
Strong In construction. 
Largest and oldest glass 
plan t In tlio South. Capac- 
ity for any and all orders 
and prompt delivery. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. Kefer- 
encos— any of our old 
customers or any bank or 
banker In Hii.ii rolnt. 
Write for catalog. 

Standard M-rror Co. 
High Point. N. C. 



BEAUTIFUL 
FLORAL 
DESIGNS 

Furnished on short, notice 




Summit Avenue Greenhouses 
HOWARD GARDNER 

Proprietor 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Office Phone 571 Res. Phone 1345 



DE. C. W. MOSELEY 

DISEASES OF 
STOMACH AND INTESTINES 



121% So. Elm St., Greensboro, N. C. 



The Newest Styles of Jewelry 

WATCHES, STERLING SILVER 
AND PLATE WARE 
Clocks that will run and a large asaert- 
ment of Fine Pocket Books, Cut Glass- 
ware and Ornaments. We are the oldest 
leading firm In the city. Everything guar- 
anteed. 

SCHIFFMAN JEWELRY CO. 

LEADING JEWELER8 




it 

(;■; 

ifj 



'A; 

% 

h 



M 

KflS 



PAINT 
STRENGTH 



Strength is what 
paint is for. The 
stronger it is, the 
less gallons and 
money it takes, 
and the longer it 
wears. The strong- 
est paint-word is 
DEVOE. 

ODELL 

Hardware Co. 



fi 

:V 
'A 



$3 



i 

LA.V1 



February 4, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Thirteen 



Our Little Folks' Department 



WHY TOMMY WAS GLAD 

"I'm glad I'm not a rabbit," 
Said Tommy, "cause, you see, 

They're not allowed at table 
At dinner or at tea; 

And goats, they eat up rags and 
things; 

And I'm glad I'm not a cat, 
For should I climb the fence, 

The folks 'ud holler 'Scat!' 
And little pigs have no clean beds; 

And doggies, they eat bones. 
Now, when I think of all these things 

I'm glad I'm Tommy Jones." 

— S. Virginia Levis. 



A BIG WORD 



"Do you know your reading lesson, 
Tommy?" Aunt Felicia inquired as her 
nephew came into the parlor from the 
nursery, where he had been preparing 
his next day's school work. 

"Yes'm; all but one big word, which 
I can not pronounce. It's the biggest 
word I've had. Why, it has five sylla- 
bles!" the young student complained. 

"Spell it," Aunt Felicia suggested. 

And Tommy read slowly from his 
open book: "O-p op, p-o-r por, t-u tu, 
n-i ni, t-y ty." 

"Yes, that is a very big word," Aunt 
Felicia agreed thoughtfully; "one of 
the biggest words we meet in life; but, 
unlike other big things, the easiest to 
lose and the hardest to find when once 
lost." 

"What does it mean?" Tommy ask- 
ed interestedly. 

"Your question is very hard," Aunt 
Felicia answered after a silence; "but 
I should say that an opportunity is an 
occasion or chance given us for ac- 
complishment." 

) "Yes'm," Tommy replied vaguely; 
and just then a whistle sounded clear- 
ly beyond^ the open window, and he 
ran out to greet his chum, Dick Dale. 

The next afternoon Tommy came 
home from school looking very sol- 
emn. This was most unusual, as the 
lad was accustomed to running in mer- 
rily, eager for his lunch and play 

"You're not ill, are you, my dear?" 
Aunt Felicia inquired anxiously. 

"No'm; I'm just sorry," Tommy an- 
swered in his funny little way. 

"Sorry about what?" came the ques- 
tion. 

'"Cause I missed a word and didn't 
get to trap clean to the top of the 
spelling class," Tommy replied. 

"But I thought you knew every word 
perfectly. You spelled them all cor- 
rectly when I heard your lesson this 
morning," Aunt Felicia observed. 

"Yes'm, I did know every word and; 
could spell 'em as fast as you'd call 
'em," the student replied gravely; "but 
you see, I was looking out the window 
watching a boy fly a kite when teacher 
gave the word out, and I didn't h< j 
She was away off from me, and I 
didn't think all those in front of me 
would miss it; but it was the hardest 
word we've had — that one I was tell- 
ing you about yesterday, you know — 
and everybody missed it till it fat to 
Sam Pratt, and he trapped us all clean 
to the top of the class and got a head 
mark. I was leading the class, you 
know ; but that head mark put Sam up 
with me, and there wasn't any use of 
my missing it, either, for I knew it 
well, only I didn't hear teacher when 
she called the word." 

"It was 'opportunity,' wasn't it?" 
Aunt Felicia asked thoughtfully. "And 
you lost it. Now do you understand 
what the word means? It means just' 
what you lost by inattention. It is a 
very big word and plays a most impor- 
tant part in everybody's life. It calls 
to us all; but if we do not answer be- 
fore it's gone we lose it and then we 
feel sorry, just as you are feeling this 
afternoon." 

"O yes'm, I believe I know what it 
means now! And I don't believe I'll 



••S"{"8 " y 

ever forget it." Tommy replied after 
a thoughtful silence. 

"Then you've learned one of the fin- 
est lessons of all," Aunt Felicia said. 
" 'Opportunity' is indeed a big word. 
— Med Ransom. 



THE BED-TIME TRAIN 

Billy and Joe could sit high up on 
the wide front porch of their own 
pleasant home and watch the trains 
coming and going to and from the city. 

There was one train that always 
came by at eight o'clock in the even- 
ing, and this was called the "bed-time 
train," because it had a great headlight 
on it, and you could see it coming, and 
the clock was upstairs, where you 
might not think of looking to see if it 
said eight o'clock. 

The nights were getting cool now, 
and when the family sat out on the 
porch they had to get coats and shawls 
and wrap up a little in order to be 
quite comfortable. Billy was sitting in 
mother's lap, and she was telling little 
piggy-wiggy stories with his fingers 
and toes, while Joe was just about to 
go to sleep in father's arms. Both 
sets of eyes were winking and blink- 
ing with the feeling of the sleepy sand 
man's sand, and both sets of eyelids 
were getting heavy. 

"The 'bed-time train' had better hur- 
ry up, or I know two little sleepy-heads 
who won't see it," said mother. 

And then both pairs of eyes opened 
up wide and began to look. "I see it," 
said Billy. "And I see it too," said 
Joe. And then they all began watch- 
ing that wonderful "bed-time train." 
They could see it leave the depot and 
dip into the subway, then hide behind 
the hill, then out again with its fiery 
eye and sweep around the curve and 
up the grade and on toward the open 
prairie. It was like a great dragon 
with smoke coming from its nostrils 
and having one great fiery eye in front 
and many smaller ones on each side. 
When you first saw it you were so far 
away that it slipped along slyly and 
silently, but by the time it got round 
the curve and to the crossing it was 
thundering along like the most awful 
dragon you could think of. "Chuff! 
chuff! chuff!" said Billy as he listened. 
"Just hear him puff!" And then as 
they looked and listened the big train 
slowed down and came to a standstill 
right at the crossing. 

Some men got off and ran up and 
down, waving lights and signaling, 
and then the big old "bed-time train" 
got up steam and puffed away. 

"I wonder why it stopped out here," 
said mother, straining her eyes after 
the disappearing train. 

"I wonder too," said father. "They 
never take people on at the crossing, 
and I've never known them to stop 
and let any one off." 

They did'nt have to wonder very 
long, though, for pretty soon they saw 
two people — a man and a woman — 
coming up the road from the crossing. 
Everybody watched with all their eyes, 
and, sure enough, the strangers turn- 
ed in at their own gate and came right 
up the walk to their own front porch, 
only when the light shone on them 
they were not strangers at all, but 
dear grandmother and Uncle Billy, 
come for a surprise visit. 

"How did you ever get them to stop 
and let you off at the crossing?" fath- 
er asked Uncle Billy. 

"I didn't," Uncle Billy answered. 
'They would not do it for me and my 
money; but grandmother got to talk- 
ing to the superintendent of the road 
and told him about this being the "bed- 
time train" and how Billy and Joe 
would be sound asleep if we had to 
get off at the depot and ride out here. 
She didn't once asked him to stop the 
train for us; he just offered to do it. 



And when grandmother thanked him 
,and told him good-by he shook hands 
with her and sent his love to Billy and 
Joe." 

That is what happened the night 
the "bed-time train" stopped; and, of 
course, Billy and Joe got to sit up a 
little later that night. — Francis McKin- 
non Morton. 



THE BROWN CREEPER 

iSometimes when you are in the 
woods you see the sunbeams playing 
on the tree trunks, having a game of 
hide and seek with the shadows cast 
by the branches. Look closely. Is 
that a little live bundle of sunshine 
and shadow creeping up the bole of 
the big beech tree? "It must be a new 
kind of mouse," you say, "mottled 
brown and white." See, it pauses, 
propping itself up with its bristle- 
pointed tail, and clings to the bark 
with its sharp claws. Did you ever 
see a mouse with a long, sickle-like 
beak? No, my friend; this is a bird, 
though he creeps like a mouse, so soft 
and still. He is one of the hardest- 
working of our feathered tree war- 
dens. As he circles the trunks and 
branches he is always peering with his 
sharp eyes for signs of insect eggs 
and grubs. With his long, sharp bill 
he pokes beneath the bark, and few 
are the insects that escape him. 

But this mouselike bird is not always 
so quiet and retiring. If you would 
see the other side of his nature, you 
must follow him to the North in the 
spring. He and his mate are busy as 
can be on an April morning, selecting 
a site for the wall pocket nest they 
mean to build. Tree after tree is ex- 
amined, till at last Mrs. Creeper says: 
"I think this loose piece of bark on 
the spruce will make a fine shelter 
for our nest." So the next morning 
she searches about till she spies a 
spider's cocoon. The little spinner's 
silk is just what she wants to fasten 
her nesting materials together. Deftly 
she unwinds length after length and 
carries it in her beak, while her hus- 
band is shredding up bark and gather- 
ing moss. 

Two weeks later there are five pink- 
ish-white eggs in the dainty nest; and 
while Mrs. Creeper patiently keeps 
them warm her mate sings cherrily 
from a near-by branch and brings her 
the choicest tid-bits he can find. The 
baby creepers are the frailest atoms 
of birds you ever saw; but watched 
over and tended by their devoted par- 
ents, it will not be long before they 
are busy destroying insect pests. — 
Margaret W. Leighton. 



: To persevere in one's duty and to be 
silent is the first answer to calumny. — 
Washington. 



GARTSIDE'S IRON RUST SOAP CO., 
4054 Lancaster Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Gartside's Iron Soap (U. S. registered 
patent No. 3477) removes iron rust, ink 
and all unwashable stains from cloth- 
ing, marble, etc., with magical effect. 
Good seller, big margins. House-to- 
house agents and store salesman want- 
ed. The original, 25c a tube. Beware 
of infringements and the penalty for 
making, selling and using an infringed 
article. Suitable for church fairs. 



CABBAGE PLANTS FREE 

Send $1.50 for One Thousand Frost 
Proof Cabbage Plants and receive an 
extra Thousand Free. Make large 
heads. 

Atlantic Coast Plant Co., 
Young's Island, S. C. 



iiis reafwiys *!^ 

6 lb. pair Pillow* to match lor •1.00 

All new, aanitai-yfeathera, Famoaa Amoakeag ticking. 
»M yards to tick, positively biggest and beet bed on market 
celling for less than $12. Safe delivery and satiflfactlon 
guaranteed or money bacir, Ordertoday or write for catalog 
and big special offer. First order counts on premium. 
SANITARY BEDDING COMPANY. Dept. 613 Charlotte, N. C 



THE SANITARY" m CUPS 

last of thousands of churches using 
our caps and FREE CATALOG with 
quotations sent upon request. 

Sanitary Communion Outfit Co.. 7lst St„ Rochester, N. Y. 



POCKET BIBLES 

For those who object to carrying 
large Bibles these Editions are 
Thin, Light and very Compact. 

AUTHORIZED VERSION, Clear 
*» Black Print, on the finest 
Thin Paper made. 
All with the Button Flap Binding 
whichgives an added advantage foi 
slipping in and out of the pocket. 

The leather cover extends com- 
pletely over the front edge and ia 
fastened on top with a button 
clasp as shown on illustration. 

Each containing a complete series 
of Colored Maps. 




Size. SYz x 3Vi in. Self- Pronouncing Agate 32mo 



N 



Specimen of Type, 

OTT when JS'sus was born tn 
BSth'16-hem of Ju-dse'a In the 



No. 1115F. French Seal, divinity circuitover- 
lapping covers, gold titles, silk head bands and silk 
marker, round corners, red gold edges. 
Publishers Price, $1.50. Our Price, Postpaid, $1.20 
Holman India Paper Pocket Text Bibles. 

Size. 3Y2 x SYi inches. Vi of an inch in thickness. 

Weighs 7Yz ounces. Same Type as 11 '1SF above. 
No. 1115XF. French Seal, divinity cireuitover- 
lapping covers, gold titles, silk head bands and 
silk marker, round corners, red gold edges. „„ 
Publishers Price, $2.40. Our Price, Postpaid, $1.80 

No. 1130XF. Same as No. 1115X with Extra 
Leather Lining.. Publishers Price, 82.80. „„ „_ 

Our Price, Postpaid, $2.1 5 

POCKET REFERENCE BIBLES PRONOUNCING 

Old and Neiv Testaments, Marginal References 
and Maps. Chapter headings on outside corner 
of each page making the Bible Self Indexed. 



Specimen of Type 

19 'And the border of the Csf. 
n&an-ites was from Si'don, as thou 



Size. 4Hx6J4 inches. Minion 16mo. 

No. 1410F. French Seal, divinity circuit over- 
lappingcovcrs.roundcorners.redgoldedges. 
Publishers Price, $2.00. Our Price, Postpaid, $1.00 

Holman India Paper Pocket Reference Bibles. 
P.onounclng, References, &c„ same type as 1410F. 
Size, 4'lx 6% inches. Minion 16mo. Vt of an inch 
in thickness. Weighs 12 ri ounces. 

No. 1413XF. French Seal, divinity circuit over" 
lapping covers, head bands and marker, round 
corners, red gold edges. Publishers Price, 
$2.50. Our Price, Postpaid, $2.10 

No. 1430XF. Svne as No. 1412XF with Extra 
Leather Linings Publishers Price, $3.00 „ 

Our Price, Postpaid, $2.50 

Address CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, 

Greensboro, N. C, 




'1°° Delivered 



Prevents galls and sore shoul- 
ders or heals those there. Made of U.S. ARMY 
DUCK, leather bearings, open at bottom; rolls 
back and forth as load comes on and off, re- 
moving friction unavoidable in a top opening 
collar. Filled with treated cotton fiber. With 
reasonable care lasts 2 to 3 years. 

One planter has "LANKFORDIZED" his 
stock and, since, a sore shoulder would be a 
*'curiosity." Users of horse and mule power 
recognize "HUMANITY" and "HORSE SENSE" 
are twins and adopt the LANKFORD. Six mil- 
lion shoulders of horses and mules have discov- 
ered the MERCIFUL, COMFORT GIVING, PAIN 
SPARING virtues of Genuine Lankford cotton 
horse collars. No shoulder of those six million 
ever galled. If your dealer does not handle the 
Genuine Lankford, write 
COUCH BROS. MFG. CO. 
Box 974 U Box 19 U 
'itlanta, Ga. Memphis, Tenn. 
Look for this trade mark 4SP 





KEEP THE TOLL 
YOURSELF 

Use the time for the drive to 
mill in grinding feed and corn 
meal. One horse cen do it. 
We guarantee capacity, mate- 
rial and workmanship in 
Star Sweep Feed Grinders 
Big returns from little in- 
estment. Ear corn and sma II 
rains ground. Saves yen 
loney. Free catalog. Write 
r Mfg.. Co.. 7. Depot St., 



. Ohit 



DAINTY COOK BOOK FREE 

We are mailing free our book, "Dain- 
ty Desserts for Dainty People," to 
anyone mentioning the name of their 
grocer. This book is beautifully illus- 
trated • in colors and gives over 100 
recipes for the daintiest Desserts, Jel- 
lies, Puddings, Salad, Candies, Ices, 
Ice Creams, etc. If you will send a 
2e stamp, we will also send you a 
full pint sample of KNOX GELA- 
TINE, or for 15c a two quart pack- 
age, if your grocer does not sell it. 

KNOX GELATINE 
201 Knox Avenue Johnstown, N. Y. 



Page Fourteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 4, 19] 



jOur Children's Home* 

X Conducted by Walter Thompson, Supt. X 

RECEIVED ON SPECIAL, GENERAL 
AND TEN PER CENT. 
COLLECTIONS 

J. S. L. Orr, North. Charlotte, $10.00; 
Union Baraca Class, Cool Sring, Cleve- 
land, W. S. Moore, $3.00; Bryson and 
Whittier Charge, Bryson City, Rev. D. 
H. Rhinehardt, $3.77; L,adies at Pros- 
pect Church, Monroe, Mrs. J. C. Pos- 
telle, $2.60. Total, $19.37. 



RECEIVED ON BUILDING FUND 

H. C. Holt, Spencer, $25.00; Men's 
Bible Class, vv. U. jrtuaasili, Jt4deJi.uj.-j-', 
$75.00; J. H. Pitts, Catawba, $25.00; 
Hon. Lee S. Overman, Washington, D. 
C, $37.50; Miss Arra Lankford, Saluda, 
$5.00; A. S. Moore, Saluda, $2.00; Mrs. 
M. C. Rice, Candler, $5.00; VV. A. Sny- 
der, North Wilkesboro, $5.00. Total, 
$179.50. 



DONATIONS IN KIND 

Woman's Missionary Society, Gran- 
ite Falls, 2 quilts; Ladies of Cooleemee 
Church, 1 quilt; Lincolnton Sunday 
school, 4 coops cnickens. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

The Act of Congress approved De- 
cember 17, 1914, relative to compound- 
ing, sale, dispensing or giving away 
opium or coca leaves, their salts, deriv- 
atives or preparations requires each 
person, firm or corporation handling 
same, whether druggist, physician, den- 
tist, veterinarian or others, to register 
with the Collector of Internal Revenue 
as such dealer on or before March 1, 
1915. 

At time of registry, Special Tax shall 
be paid at rate of $1.00 per year or 34 
cents for period March 1st to June 30, 
1915, and order forms, to be used in 
case of each purchase, costing $1.00 
per hundred from the Collector. 

A penalty of $2,000.00 is imposed for 
violation or failure to comply with pro- 
visions of this act. 

Copies of the act and regulations 
thereunder giving full information to 
those interested can be obtained from 
the Collector of Internal Revenue. 

A. D. Watts, 
_ Collector. 

Paint Without Oil 

Remarkable Discovery That Cuts Down 
the Cost of Paint Seventy- 
Five Per Cent. 



A Free Trial Package Is Mailed to Every- 
one Who Writes 

A. L. Rice, a prominent manufacturer 
of Adams, N. Y., lias discovered a pracess 
of making a new kind of paint without the 
use of oil. He calls it Powdrpaint. It 
comes in the form of a dry powder and all 
that is required is cold water to make a 
paint weather proof, fire proof and as dur- 
able as oil paint. It adheres to any sur- 
face, wood, stone or brick, spreads and 
looks like oil paint and costs about one- 
fourth as much. 

Write to Mr. A. L. Rice, Manuf'r, 144 
North St., Adams, N. T., and he will send 
you a free trial package, also color card 
and full information showing you how you 
can save a good many dollars. Write to- 
day. 



YOUR FRECKLES 



Nood Attention In February and 
March or Face Will Stay 
Covered. 

Now is the time to take special care 
of the complexion if you wish it to look 
well the rest of the year. The February 
and March winds have a strong tendency 
to bring out freckles that may stay all 
Summer unless removed. Now is the 
time to use othine— double strength. 

This prescription for the removal of 
freckles was written by a prominent 
physician and is usually so successful 
that it is sold by your druggist under 
guarantee to refund the money if it 
fails. Get an ounce of othine— double 
strength, and even a few applications 
Bhould show a wonderful improvement, 
some of the smaller freckles even vanish- 
ing entirely. 



Have your friends take advan- 
tage of this special offer 
as well as 
5 



The Christian Advocate Offers You 

This Well Known Bible Dictionary 

SEE SPECIAL OFFER BELOW 

Realizing the wide demand that exists among our constituents for this Bible Dictionary, we have 
made a special arrangement with the publishers of the work by which they agreed to supply it to 

us on exceptional terms, provided we 
would widely advertise it, and this 
enables us to offer this well-known 
Bible Dictionary in its original form 
and with all its important features, 
including over 400 illustrations and 
maps in colors, at less than half the 
regular price. 

THE FATHER OF ALL BIBLE 
DICTIONARIES 

Everyone acknowledges the superior 
value of Dr. William Smith's Bible Dic- 
tionary, ascontaining thefraitof theripest 
Biblical scholarship. It is practically the 
foundation, or father, of all other Bible 
Dictionaries. Thi s late edition is brought 
down to the twentieth century and thor- 
oughly revised to incorporate modern re- 
search and discoveries in Bible lands. It 
has been adapted i n i ts present form to the 
convenience of teachers and scholars. 




• ' T H 
l °UBET 



W ' it O. 




ced 
the 
>ok 
iize 
140 
aps 
in 
ing 



MAKES BIBLE STUDY EASY. 
MAKES THE BIBLE PLAIN 
TO EVERY READER 

This Bible Dictionary is a veritable 
treasureto Christian Workers. Itcontains 
in the simplest language a full explanation 
of all topics mentioned in the Bible — every 
place, nation, tribe, person, and historical 
event; every custom and rite ; every instru- 
mentand implement; every animal, plant, 
flower, mineral, metal, etc. It is a system- 
atic collation of all the facts recorded in 
the Bible, supplemented and explained by 
materials supplied from authentic records 
of Biblical times. It gives in compact and 
lucid form the substance of the result of 

?rofound Biblical scholarship and research. 
T OPENS A NEW UNDERSTAND- 
ING AND APPRECIATION OF THE 
BIBLE IN A WAY THAT NO OTHER 
BOOK DOES. 

Our Special Offer 

From this till March first 
we offer the Advocate one 
year and this dictionary for 



$2.50 



This applies to new subscrib- 
ers and renewals. 



^<taress.CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, GREENSBORO, N. C. 



"Now, Thomas," said the teacher se- 
verely, "how many times must I tell 
you not to snap your fingers? Put your 
hand down, and presently I'll hear from 
you." Five minutes later she said: 
"Now, then, Thomas, what was it you 
wanted to say?" "There was a man in 
-the entry a while ago," said Thomas 
serenely, "and he went out with your 
new silk umbrella." — Exchange. 



THIS SPACE SELONSS TO 

ROBT. W.MURRAY 

GENERAL 

INSURANCE 

Gre«nib«ro. Nertk Carolina 
SM/t South ELai St. 
Phono 1*8 



MILLER, ROBINS & WEILL 

Gaaaral Insurance 
Gonorol Agent* Fidelity and 
Daaaalt Company of Maryland 
1Sf North Km Stroot 'Phono 44 



Carolina & Northwestern Rwy, Co, 

Schedule Effective October 18th, 1914 



Northbound 


NO. 10 
Fassengei 
Ex. Sun. 




NO. 8 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 6 
Passenger 
Sun. Only 


NO. 50 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 52 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


Chester Lv . 


7 60 a m 

8 36 

9 21! 
9 30 

10 28 

11 05 

12 06 p m 
1 08 

1 OOx 
4 09 
4 85 










4 15 p m 
6 88 
8 20 


Yorltvllle " 
















Gastonia " 


4 30 p m 
6 40 

6 44 

7 80 

8 60 














Newton ' ' 








Hickory .'• 


12 05 p m 
1 08 


6 45 a m 
8 07 




Lenoir " 




Lenoir " 




Mortimer 1 ' 










Edgemont Ar. 










Southbound 


NO. 9 
Passenger 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 7 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 5 
Passenger 
Sun. Only 


NO. 61 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 53 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


Kdgemont Lv. 


9 00 a m 
9 10 
11 20! 

1 85 p m 

2 86 
8 05 
8 43 

4 30 

5 06x 

6 54 
6 40 










Mortimer 1 ' 










Lenoir " 










Lenoir. ' ' 


7 00 a m 

8 16 

9 00 
9 61 

11 28 


8 15 a m 

9 12 


1 10 p m 
8 20 




Hickory 1 ' 




Newton ' ' 












Gastonia ' 1 

Gastonia ' ' 

Yorkvllle " 






11 50 a m 
1 24 

8 10 p m 



















x Leave 



CONNECTIONS 



CHESTER— Southern Railway, S. A. L. and L. & C. 
YORKVILLE— Southern Railway LINCOLNTON— S. 

GASTONIA— Southern Railway, Piedmont & Northern Railway 
NEWTON and HICKORY— Southern Railway 



E. F. REID. G. P. Agt. 



CHESTER, S. C 



February 4, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Fifteen 



Quarterly Meetings | 

ASH EV I LLE DISTRICT— C. A. W»«d, 
Presiding Elder, Weavervllle, N. C. 
First Round 

February 

Sulphur Springs, Laurel Hill 6-7 

West Ashevllle, night 7 

Swannanoa, Swannanoa 13-14 

Black Mountain, night 14 

Weavervllle Ct., Flint Hill 20-21 

Bethel, night 21 



CHARLOTTE DISTRICT— J. C. Row«, 
Presiding Elder, Charlotte, N. C. 
First Round 

February 

Ansonville, Ansonville 4-7 

Waxhaw, Waxhaw 13-14 

Spencer Memerial 21 



GREENSBORO DISTRICT— J. H. Weav- 
er, Presiding Elder, Greensboro, N. C. 
First Round 

February 

Deep River, Cedar Falls *-7 

West Market 13-14 



MT. AIRY DISTRICT— H. C. Sprinkle, 
Presiding Elder, Mt. Airy, N. C. 
First Round 

February 

Dobson, Stony Knoll 1-7 

Pilot Mountain, FUst Mountain 13-14 

Ararat, Chestnut Grove 2»-21 

Mt. Airy Ct, Zion 27-28 



NORTH WILKESBORO DISTRICT— J. H. 
Bennett, Presiding Elder, North 
Wllkesboro, N. C. 
First Round 

February 

Avery, Fairvlew 8-7 

Boone, Rutherwood 13-14 

Laurel Springs, Transon 20-21 

Sparta, Potato Creek 27-28 



STATES VI LLE DISTRICT— L. T. Mann, 
Presiding Elder, Statesvllle, N. C. 
First Round 

February 

Mt. Zion and Huntersville, Mt. Zlon, 

.11 a in. ^ . . . 6-7 

Davidson, Davidson, night 7-8 

Mooresville Ct., Fair View, 11 a. m., 13-14 
Mooresville Sta., Mooresville, night, 14-16 
Cool Spring Ct., Cool Spg., 11 a. m., 20-21 
Troutman Ct., Shepherds, 11 a. m., 27-28 



SHELBY DISTRICT— J. R. Scroggs, 
Presiding Elder, Shelby, N. C. 
Second Round 

February 

Dallas, Dallas 6 

Gastonia, F. Ave 6 

Gastonia, Main Street 7 

Lowesville, Snow Hill 13-14 

Mt. Holly, Mt. Island 14-15 

Bessemer, Concord 20-21 

Lowell, Lowell 27-28 

McAdenville, McAdenville 28 

March 

King's Mountain, ElBethel 6-7 

Polkville, Polkville 13-14 

Rock Springs, Mt. Pleasant 20-21 

Belwood, Kadish 27-28 

April 

Shelby Circuit, Sulphur Springs 3-4 

Lincolnton Circuit, Marvin 10-11 

Lincolnton, Lincolnton 11 

Crouse, Pleasant Grove 17-18 

Stanly, Iron 18-19 

South Fork, Plateau 24-25 



SALISBURY DISTRICT— W. R. Ware, 
Presiding Elder, Salisbury, N. C. 
Second Round 

February 

Salisbury, South Main Street, 11 a. m., 14 

Salisbury', Holmes Memorial, night 14 

Salisbury, First Church, 11 a. m 21 

E. Spencer-N. Main St., N. Main St. 

night 21 

Salisbury Circuit, Providence 27-28 

Spencer, night 28 

March 

Concord Circuit, Mt. Carmel 6-7 

Concord, Forest Hill, night, 7-8 

Woodleaf Circuit, Gay's Chapel 13-14 

West Concord, Kerr St., night 14-15 

Cottonville & Oakboro Ct. Mt. Zion 20-21 

Norwood 20-21 

Concord, Central, 11 a. m 28 

Concord, Epwor'th & C, Epworth, 

night 28 

April 

Albemarle, Central, night 2-4 

Albemarle Circuit, Stony Hill 3-4 

Mount Pleasant Circuit, Saint Paul, 10-11 

Concord, Westford, night 11 

Salem Circuit, New Mount Tabor 17-18 

Albemarle, First Street, night 18 

Kannapolis Station, 11 a. m 23-25 

Kannapolis Circuit, Bethpage 24-25 

China Grove & Landis, China Grove, 

night 25 

May 

New London Circuit 1-2 

Gold Hill Circuit 2-3 

Bethel & Love's Chapel, Love's Chapel 8-9 



MORG ANTON DI8TRICT— J. E. Gay, 
Presiding Elder, Marlon, N. C. 
First Round 

February 

Spruce Pine and Bakersvllle, Spruce 

Pine B-7 

Mlcaville, South Toe 6-7 

Bald Creek, Bald Creek 13-14 

Burnsville 14-15 

Marion Ct., Green Mountain 20-21 



WAYNESVILLE DISTRICT— L. T. Cor- 
dell, Presiding Elder, Ashevllle, N. C, 
R. F. D. No. 2 
First Round 

February 

Judson Ct., Maple Springs 2-3 

Robbinsville Ct., Robbinsville 4-5 

Andrews Station 8-7 

Macon Ct., Union 13-14 

Franklin Ct., Salem 16-17 

Highlands Ct., Highlands 18-19 

Franklin Station 21-22 



WINSTON DISTRICT— H. K. Boyer, Pre- 
siding Elder, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Second Round 

February 

Southside, 11 a. m 14 

Centenary, night 14 

Walkertown 20-21 

Grace, night 21 

Linwood, Macedonia 27-28 

Lexington, night 28 

March 

Thomasville, South Thomasville 6-7 

Thomasville, Main Street, 5-7 

Advance, Advance 13 -14 

Burkhead, night 14 

Davidson, Midway 20-21 

Forsythe, Mineral Spring 27-28 

West End, night 28 

April 

Jackson Hill, Jackson Hill 3-4 

Salem, night 4 

Farmington, Bethlehem 10-11 

Mocksville 9-11 

Lewisville, Concord 17-18 

Davie, Liberty 24-25 

Cooleemee, night 25 

May 

Kernersville 1-2 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 
N. B. — Following schedule figure* are 

published only as information and are 
not guaranteed. 

12:15 a. m. — No 32 dally Southern's 
Southeastern Limited. Pullman drawing- 
room, open section sleeping cars Jack- 
sonville and Augusta to New York. Din- 
ing car service. Day coaches. 

12:35 a. m. — No. 112, daily, local for 
Raleigh, 'Selma and Goldsboro. Pullman 
sleeping car Winston-Salom to Raleigh 
which is open at 9:80 and may bo occu- 
pied In Raleigh until 7 a. m. 

1:42 a. m.— No. 30, dally, Birmingham 
Special. Pullman drawing-room and ob- 
servation sleeping cars Birmingham and 
Columbus to New York, and Birmingham 
to Richmond. Dining car service. Day 
coaches 

1:50 a. m. — No. 29 daily, Birmingham 
Special. Pullman drawing-room and ob- 
servation sleeping cars New York and 
Richmond to Birmingham and Columbus. 
Dally tourist car Washington to San 
Francisco via popular Sunset Route. Din- 
ing cars. Coaches. 

3:15 a. m. — No. 31 daily, The Southern's 
Southeastern Limited. Pullman drawing- 
room and open section sleeping cars New 
York to Jacksonville and Augusta. Din- 
ing car service. Day coaches. 

3:45 a. m. — No. 45 dally, local for Char- 
lotte, connecting for Atlanta and points 
south. 

7:10 a. m. — No. 8 dally, local for Rich- 
mond. 

7:15 a. m.— No. 37 dally. New York, At- 
lanta and New Orleans Limited. Solid 
Pullman train with observation and open 
section sleeping cars New York to New 
Orleans, and New York to Ashevllle, and 
Macon. Pullman parlor car Greensbore 
to Montgomery. Club car Washington to 
Montgomery. Dining car service. 

7:30 a. m.— No. 108 daily, local for Ral- 
eigh, Selma, and Goldsboro. 

7:40 a. m. — No. 154 dally, except Sunday 
for Ramseur. 

7:25 a. m. — No. 11, dally, local for At- 
lanta. Pullman sleeping cars Norfolk and 
Richmond to Charotte. Day coaches. 

8:15 a. m.— No. 237, dally, for Wlnaton- 
Salem and North Wllkesboro. Pullman 
sleeping car Raleigh to Winston -Salem. 

8:20 a. m.— No. 183, dally, local for Mt. 
Airy. 

9:80 a. m.— No. 44, dally, for Washing- 
ton and points north. 

9:40 a. m.— No. 144, dally, Raleigh, Sel- 
ma and Goldsboro Pullman sleeping car 
Atlanta to Raleigh. 

12:30 p. m. — No. 21, daily, for Ashevllle 
and Waynesvllle, connecting at Ashevllle 
with Carolina Special for all points west. 
Chair car Goldsboro to Ashevllle. 

12:55 p. m. — No. 130, dally, local for San- 
ford, Fayettevllle and Wilmington. 

1:30 p. m. — No. 7, dally, local for Char- 
lotte, connecting for Seneca and Colum- 
bia. 

1:30 p. m.— No. 36, dally U. S. Fast Mall 
for Washington, New York and points 
north. Pullman sleeping cars New Or- 
leans and Birmingham te New York. Din- 
ing car service. Day coaches. 

2:00 p. m. — No. 207, daily, for Winston- 
Salem, connecting daily except Sunday for 
North Wllkesboro. 

2:30 p. m.— No. 151, dally, except Sun- 
day for Madison. 

3:30 p. m. — No. 230, daily, except Sun- 
day for Ramseur. 

4:16 p. m.— No. 22, daily, for Raleigh, 
Selma and Goldsboro. Chair car. 

5:05 p. m.— No. 131, daily, for Mt. Airy. 

6:25 p. m.— No. 85, dally, U. S. Fast 
Mail, for Atlanta, New Orleans and Bir- 
mingham. Pullman sleeping cars New 



TRINITY COLLEGE 

FOUNDED 1838 : : ; CHARTERED 1859 

A Southern institution of established national reputation. Classical and scientific courses 
leading to the bachelor's degree. Graduate courses in all departments. Schools of Engineer- 
ing, Education and Law. 

Large endowment fund makes possible complete, first- 
class equipment; full faculty of able, well-chosen instruc- 
tors; beautiful campus, new buildings, modern labora- 
tories, splendid library. Comfortable, inexpensive dormi- 
tories. For catalogue and illustrated booklet, address 

R. L. Flowers, Sec. to the Corporation, Durham, N. C. 





Early . 
'Jersey Wakefield 



I pay from three to five times as much for Peter 
Henderson & Co.'s seed as other planters pay f r 
ordinary seech Actual figures, $3.50 per lb. for 



Charleston Large 
Type Wakefield 



Wakeflelds", $4.00 per lb. for Flat Dutch, against 75c. per lb. for ordinary seed. 
I My customers get the benefit in 

PERFECT PLANTS AT NO EXTRA COST 

Why not plant cabbage grown from high-grade seed and raise a successful crop, 
rather than use plants from inferior seed and be disappointed in the results? It 
costs no more. 

If 1 am out of the variety you want I will tell you. I NEVER SUBSTITUTE EX- 
| CEPT WHEN REQUESTED BY THE PURCHASER. 

Prices by Express: 1,000 to 4,000, $1.50 per 1,000; 5,000 to 9,000, $1.25 per 1.000; 10,000 or 
over $1,00 per 1,000. 

Varieties: Early Jersey Wakefield, Charleston 
Wakefield, Henderson's Succession, Plat Dutch, 
At! Frost Proof. Order early to be sure of the 
variety you want. 

2,000 bushels Harrison's Selected Seed Corn, 
$2.00 per bushe F. O. B. Charleston, S. C. 



JOS. M. HARRIS ON 

v CHARLESTON, ' S'.C. ; ^fe 





GREENSBORO NURSERIES 

AGENTS WANTED 

For Fruit, Shade and Ornamental Trees, Vines and Plants. 

JOHN A. YOUNG & SONS, Greensboro, N. C. 



Agents Wanted 



•J We want good, live, hustling agents in 
all towns. .: :: :: :: :: 

Cflf you desire good work and prompt 
j^er/vice, we are at your command. :: :: 

A Write for our liberal terms. Represent 

The Charlotte Laundry 

OLDEST LARGEST BEST 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



A Big 



You The The The 
Decide: School: Methods: Results: 



A !%w Msons Why You Should Enroll With Us 



We teach Stenotypy, the fastest method of writing. Our courses teach you ito 
know. We train you to grasp your opportunity. Latest improved methods. Your 
choice of pine different systems of shorthand, two of them hold world's record for 
speed and accuracy. 

Rates and terms most reasonable. Real business courses as taught at a real 
commercial college. Results unequalled. Twenty-five students recently placed in 
positions. J 

Write for further information and terms. Do not put off this important step. 

CENTRAL BUSINESS COLLEGE, ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 

r S. SPRADLIN, President 

Methodist Benevolent Association 

A Mutual Benefit Brotherhood for Southern Methodists. Issues Whole Lite, 
M- Premium Life, Term to 60, and Disability-Old Age Certificates. Benefits, at 
death, disability, or old age. 8150, 000 paid widows, orphans, disabled. Reserve 
830,000. For terms, etc., write J. H. SHUMAKER, Sec'y, Nashville. Tenn. 



York to New*' Orleans and Birmingham. 
Dining car service Dav coaches 

6:35 p. m. — No. 235, dally, for Winston- 
Salem. 

7:15 p. m.^-No. 132, dally local for 
Sanford. 

7:32 p. m. — No. 43, dally, for Alanta, 
and points south Sleeping car Raleigh to 
Atlanta. 

10:15 p. m. — No. 12, dally, local, for 
Richmond. Pullman sleeping cars Char- 
lotte to Richmond and Norfolk. 

10:20 p. m. — No. 233, dally, for Winston- 
Salem. 

11:29 p. m.— No. 38, dally. New York, 



Atlanta and New Orleans Limited. Solid 
Pullman train with observation and open 
section sleeping cars New Orleans, Macon 
and Ashevllle to New York. Dining car. 

B. H. COAPMAN, Vice-President and 
General Manager, Washington, D. C. 

S. H. HARD WICK, P. T. M., Washington 
D. C. 

H. F. CARY, G. P. A., Washington, D. C. 
R. H DeBTJTTS, D. P. A., CharlotU, 

N. C. 

C. G. PICKARD, P. and T. A., Oreens- 
b»r«, N. C. 



Page Sixteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 4, 19] 



PUBLISHER'S MESSAGE 

A TALK ABOUT BUSINESS 

AND PLEA FOR CO-OPERATION 



One would suppose that it would just be a delight to 
the Methodist business man in Western North Carolina 
to patronize the North Carolina Christian Advocate. Both 
the Advertising and Job Printing departments should ap- 
peal to these men. We believe this will be the ease when 
attention is persistently called to it. Notwithstanding we 
have had a good deal to say from time to time, it is still 
true that many of our people have not fully realized the 
value of the Advocate as 

An Advertising Medium 

If our merchants, manufacturers, farmers and business 
men generally could be induced to try it we have no 
doubt they would be amply repaid for money paid in ex- 
change for our advertising space. There ought to be a 
regular col umn filled with classified or want ads. and we 
hope to get our people who want anything or who have 
anything to sell to use the Advocate space and thus help 
their own business while helping to support an important 
institution of the church. For years a few of our enter- 
prising business men have appreciated the Advocate as an 
advertising medium, but the great majority of them need 
yet to have their attention called to this. While throwing 
away vast' sums of money on various advertising schemes 
presented by the promoter, they let this really rich op- 
portunity go by unimproved. 

We have purged our columns of all advertising which 
can not be rated as first class and clean in every respect 
and this itself greatly enhances the value of our space. 

Again, there are hundreds of business men all over 
our section who have large quantities of printing done. 
They could turn much of this our way just as well, and 
many could turn all their job work into our house. 

We are Equipped 

for all kinds of job printing, especially pamphlets and 
commercial work, and this would help the Board of Publi- 
cation very much in its efforts to establish firmly the busi- 
ness and make a great paper for the Conference. The 
members of this Board give their time and thought to 
this business without charge or hope of remuneration — 
their work is a labor of love. They feel the more free to 
appeal to 

Methodist Business Men 

to think of our Advocate printing house in Greensboro 
when they need anything in that line, and if they can get 
what they want we feel sure they will take pleasure in 
turning patronage this way. Just think of it 

The Stationery of Our Country Stores 

would make a nice business for our Job Department and 
would well-nigh keep our presses busy 1 ! 

Then think of the physicians, lawyers, preachers and 
other professional men who use printed stationery and 
other printed matter, besides printing for the churches 
and church organizations. Of course we do not expect a 
monopoly of all this business, and we are already getting 
a goodly share ; but there are many who have never had 



their attention called specially to this, and with a little 
more thoughtfulness our business ought easily to be dou- 
bled, especially in the line of commercial work. It is 
evident that we need 

More Diligent Co-operation 

While any church business enterprise must depend 
mainly upon those who have charge, and cannot be 
allowed to depend upon such patronage as church loyalty 
alone would bring, it is nevertheless true that much de- 
pends upon that spirit of co-operation which church 
loyalty suggests and prompts. There are a few country 
merchants who have sent us their orders for stationery 
regularly since we began work in that line. They seem 
to be pleased, our business is benefited and we very 
greatly appreciate their spirit of co-operation. 

A large manufacturer in one of our thriving towns, 
after hearing the editor at a District Conference last 
year, frankly stated that he had not had his attention 
called to this before and that he had quite a good deal 
of work that, everything else being equal, he would be 
glad to turn our way. Since that time we have been 
getting nice orders occasionally, and if fifty or seventy- 
five more, who no doubt are in the same position, 
would do likewise, most of our problems would be 
solved, for the reason that this additional work would 
be handled without appreciable increase in our pay- 
roll. 

The Sale of Books 

For some two years or more we have been handling 
books in a small way. Most of this is purely a mail order 
business. We have arrangements with publishers to fill 
our orders, and allow us the trade discount ; so, without 
paying any more for books our people can send their 
orders through us and thus add quite a little item to 
our income. The only difference to the purchaser would 
be a delay of about one day. This applies to orders 
from Smith & Lamar, or any publishers in the United 
States. We hope to have the co-operation of our people 
in this respect also. We ought to co-operate in an ef- 
fort to put more good books into the hands of our peo- 
ple. Nothing is needed more today than the turning of 
the minds of our people into the channels of more 
serious and profitable thought. Good books will do this. 

Church Supplies 

Record books for Quarterly Conference, Church Con- 
ference, Sunday Schools, Baraca and Philathea Classes, 
etc., Bibles and Disciplines can be secured through us at 
the same prices charged by our Publishing House and 
other dealers. Why not turn the trade commission or 
discount into our own treasury'? 

We take it that the Board need offer no apology for 
thus going into details in order to show our people of 
this opportunity for profitable and helpful co-operation. 

For further information write 

BOARD OF PUBLICATION, 

Greensboro, N. C. 



nortD Carolina 




Advocate 



Volume LX 




Official Oipt of Xk lUestern north l&rolinaeonference 
TOethoaist episcopal £l)urcb, Soutl) 



Greensboro, N. C, Thursday, February 11, 191F^ 



A TIME FOR PRAYER 



This week will perhaps decide the ques- 
tion as to whether our homes and our boys 
are to have protection against their greatest 
enemy. By circular letter the stream of death 
has been turned into our homes, and those 
who would make merchandise of the souls 
and bodies of our boys are now baiting them 
for ruin. Shall we allow this to continue? 
Shall we, for the accommodation of a few 
wrecks of humanity, and others whose lust 
for money and self-indulgence would over- 
balance their regard for the peace and order 
of society, sacrifice our boys and the happi- 
ness of our homes? During the past two 
weeks we have prayed by petitions and let- 
ters to our representatives at Raleigh. Now 
let us pray to God that these men may be 
made courageous in the time of supreme test. 
See editorial page this week. 



Number 6 





Page Two 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



THE IRONY OF FA TE! 



Facing the Situation All too Soor 
What Will Our Legislators Do: 



Years ago, when the struggle for prohibition 
began in earnest, there were many who said 
that they feared the jug trade. These people 
held first that bar rooms on the outside of a 
town would be more of a menace than those in- 
side under municipal control. At that time 
they did not hesitate to declare themselves as 
opposed to liquor, and ready to vote for prohibi- 
tion whenever it should be made a state-wide 
issue. "If you will just let us have a chance 
to put it out of the state we will go with you, ' ' 
they said. 

After awhile they were given the opportunity 
to vote it out of the state. Immediately they 
shifted their position in mortal dread of the jug 
trade, the blind tiger, etc.. and they widened 
their horizon. They said that they would be 
with us, teeth and toenail, if only we would 
make the proposition nation-wide and drive it 
from the United States. They were ardent ad- 
vocates of temperance, but would never vote for 
prohibition as long as there remained the possi- 
bility of demoralizing the country with the jug 
trade. No, not they. 

The fact is, these people never wanted prohi- 
bition and some middle-aged men and women 
have lived long enough to see them dodge the 
issue half a dozen times, till now. lo ! and be- 
hold! they are frightened to death with the 
prospect of an opportunity of helping to vote 
it out of the United States ! This is surely the 
irony of fate. They never expected to see 
the day when they would be face to face with 
the question of doing what they so often boast- 
ed that they would be only too glad to do. 

Some people are exceedingly strange. They 
take shelter in all sorts of subterfuge in order to 
shield their hypocracy. These are the people 
who have been telling us that prohibition does 
not prohibit, and that more liquor is sold and 
used under prohibition than under license, that 
we simply lose the revenue without abating 
the evil. There is a fear that the present legis- 
lature in North Carolina is in danger of halting 
on the threshold of a good opportunity to have 
prohibition that will prohibit. For the first 
time in the history of the state it is now pos- 
sible to stop the last hole and shut out all 
liquor for beverage purposes, and here comes 
the cry of party expediency, and the invasion 
of personal liberty. To cap the climax, the 
alarm is given that Keely Institute will be 
stranded! Surely this is the last straw on the 
camel's back, and the bill must not pass, not- 
withstanding the state asked for prohibition 
by nearly 50.000 majority in 1908. To be 
sure, Keeley Institute would soon be without 
a constituency if we shut off the supply of 
liquor, and we believe even Colonel Osborne 
will be glad when there are no more inebriates 
to give it patronage. If we can get the sort of 
prohibition proposed in the bill now before the 
legislature, Keely Institute and all institutions 
for the treatment of inebriacy, will be as use- 
less as a military school in the millennium. 

We suspect that, after all, many of our 
friends have really never wanted a prohibition 
law that would quite prohibit, and they now 
face a situation all too soon that is going to 
put them to the test. We have some mighty 
good men in this legislature, and we are not pre- 
pared to accept the averment of some who say 
that the majority of them will falter when the 
test comes. 

# # # * 

Referring to the question as to whether pro- 
hibition, even as we have it, prohibits, the ed- 
itor of the Baltimore Southern Methodist, gives 
a fine discussion which we here reproduce, and 
which will prove illuminating to those who 
study it. He says: 

If Prohibition Is Not Prohibiting, Man Is Los- 
ing His Taste For Mint Juleps 

One of the favorite arguments of whiskey ora- 
tors, that, on account of its plausibility, has 
strongly appealed to moral and even religious 
men, has been "Prohibition doesn't prohibit; 
it breeds blind tigers and hypocrites and en- 
courages immorality. Therefore; as a commun- 



ity cannot get rid of liquor anyway, in the 
interests of morality, it is better for it to be 
sold under the eye of the law with proper safe- 
guards, than lawlessly." For whiskey men to 
be prating about the moral interests of a com- 
munity is like the devil opening a school for the 
teaching of virtue. 

It does not take a skilled logician to point out 
the fallacies in the foregoing argument as it is 
unnecessary, for its backbone has been broken 
by recent developments that stand out in such 
bold relief that even the blind can see. The 
Hoster-Columbus Breweries of Columbus, O., a 
$12,000,000 corporation, by order of the United 
States district court is in the hands of a receiv- 
er. A statement issued by the company gives as 
the cause : ' ' Decreased demands for beer, ad- 
verse legislation, and the voting dry of many 
states and countries in the last eight years." 
' ' The crowning blow, ' ' it says, ' ' came in loss of 
West Virginia, where we did a business of near- 
ly $500,000 a year, to say nothing of old Vir- 
ginia's voting dry, to go into effect in 1916." 
According to Commissioner Blue, of West Vir- 
ginia, Cincinnati alone formerly got $1,000,000 
from that little state for that which is worse 
than useless. Think of the enormous sum in 
addition to other sums, most of it from the pock- 
ets of the poor, coming out of West Virginia 
every year that now goes into the legitimate 
channels of trade — for groceries, clothing, edu- 
cation, travel, and religion. Commissioner 
Blue, in his address the other Sunday afternoon 
at the Lyric, spoke of the marvelous transfor- 
mation in industrial centers, giving facts and 
figures that were an eloquent testimony of the 
material and moral benefits of prohibition, and 
emphasized the fact attested by the wail of the 
brewers that in West Virginia prohibition does 
prohibit. 

As to whether prohibition does or does not 
prohibit as a rule, let our enemies, the brewers, 
again be the judges. In the January number 
of the ' ' American Brewers ' Review, ' ' is the fol- 
lowing significant paragraph : 

"The outstanding facts are that five more 
states have adopted state-wide prohibition, and 
that there has been a decrease of over 2,000,000 
barrels in the amount of beer produced as 
against the preceding year. Also there has 
been a loss of about forty breweries, the total 
number of breweries, according to the annual 
report of the commissioner of internal revenue 
for the year ended June 30, 1914. being 1,392. 
These facts present the gloomy side of the pic- 
ture." 

"Mida's Criterion," of Chicago, published in 
the interest of the liquor business, seems to be 
profoundly impressed with the fact, that some- 
how or other prohibition does prohibit. Its pes- 
simistic cry is voiced in this language : 

"Immediately after the recent elections in 
the west when the trade lost four states there 
was some congratulation that things were no 
worse. Since the trade has analyzed the situ- 
ation and watched the course of events grow- 
ing out of the new conditions a feeling of de- 
pression has settled over it and even now, quite 
three weeks after the issue was settled, the 
cloud presses down on the trade with even 
more force. It seems gratuitous to call atten- 
tion to the fact but it seems nevertheless to be 
true that California was saved to the trade by 
the vote of San Francisco, and it seems that 
even Ohio was saved by the vote of the cities, 
notably Cincinnati and Cleveland. Attention 
would not be called to this melancholy fact 
were it not best for the trade to face the situ- 
ation as it really is by way of preparing for 
the future, as there will inevitably be a future. 
As the trade looks over the situation as it is 
today it is rather stupefied. There is really no 
parallel to present conditions in the trade. In 
lime gone by when the trade lost a state or 
two it recovered from the shock and in a few 
weeks or a month or so business had adjusted 
itself to the new circumstances and the wheels 
were turning much as ever. But business never 
suffered such discouragement before." 



When one takes into consideration that th( 
report of the internal revenue commissioner 
ending June 30, 1914, recently made public 
shows a decrease in the production of distillec 
liquor of 10,000,000 gallons, and a decrease ii 
consumption of 4,000,000, and that in spite oi 
the decreased production of distilleries and tht 
fact that there are 127 fewer of these poison 
making factories than in 1913, there is an over 
supply of whiskey in the bonded warehouses, he 
is impressed with the appropriateness of th< 
distilleries blending their tenor with the deej 
bass notes of the brewers in the song entitlec 
"The Handwriting on the Wall." 

Even Kentucky can join in the song, for i 
is reported that Col. G. W. Dunlap, superin 
tendent of the Pepper Distilling Company, oi 
Lexington, has said, "Prohibition agitation is 
cutting a figure in the consumption of the Ken 
tucky product, necessitating the curtailment oi 
the output." 

The latest figures as to the advance of prohi- 
bition in the United States might put some more 
ginger in the music. Of a total of 2,973,890 
square miles in the United States, 2,236,062 arc 
prohibition territory. The total population of 
the United States is 91,972,266 persons, oi 
whom 48,118,394 now reside in territory in 
which the liquor traffic has been outlawed. In 
other words, about 80 per cent, of the area oi 
this country is under prohibition and approx- 
imately 54 per cent, of the total population lives 
in the territory. Add to this the growing 
world-wide prohibitory sentiment developed in 
part by the European war, which revealed the 
decreased efficiency of soldiers using alcoholic 
drinks, and by scientific tests showing physical, 
mental and moral deterioration of drinkers, 
the future of the liquor traffic does not seem to 
be painted in specially roseate tints. 

,i ( ' T- ' 

# * • * 

The People Come to a Knowledge of the 

truth slowly on the effects of alcohol as well 
as its value as a medicine. Till recently it 
has been generally accepted that in the prac- 
tice of medicine alcohol is essential. Even the 
best of people thought it necessary to have 
some on hand for use in emergencies. A phy- 
sician here and yonder for many years has had 
the courage to speak out against it and to de- 
clare that it has no real value as a medicine. 
During the past year the North Carolina Med- 
ical Society placed itself on record as opposed 
to the use of alcohol in the practice of medi- 
vine, and this has done more to make strong 
the cause of prohibition in North Carolina than 
anything that has taken place during a half a 
century. Why should our legislators hesitate 
with such strong backing as this? Besides the 
opinion of the North Carolina physicians, listen 
to the words of an eminent surgeon, Dr. George 
A. Lung of the United States Nayy: "Who is 
to be the authority to set the limit, and say 
where safety ends and danger begins? As a 
beverage, or even as a medicine, I am almosl 
convinced that the world could be deprived oi 
alcohol and not suffer. I am almost convinced 
that the world would be better for its absence. 
The opening wedge is usually the insidious 
argument that 'a little drinking will do nc 
harm,' but soon this develops the universal 
craving which sooner or later gives license foi 
an indulgence making an evil end probable. Nc 
young man, or even an old one, who may be 
classed as an occasional drinker, can foretell tc 
a certainty that he will not degrade, as he ad- 
vances in years, first to the state of a drunkarc 
and then to that of an inebriate." 



SPECIAL NOTICE 



Advocate Sunday and the week following 
for special canvass were completely annulled 
on account of inclement weather. This is tc 
thank the brethren who are now taking up the 
work and to request that all do so at once. The 
need is urgent. Not only is the money needec 
for current expenses, but it is very necessarj 
that all dead heads be removed from the lists 



February 11, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Three 



NOTE AND COMMENT 

What a Little World this is to men and 
women who cannot read ! What a small sphere 
this in which they move ! Let us not deceive 
ourselves. While we boast of the progress of 
education we are still far from the goal. The 
inefficiency of our Sunday schoools is largely 
due to illiteracy. Only those who have had 
varied experience and a rather wide oppor- 
tunity for observation have any idea to what 
extent the work is handicapped by illiteracy. 
In many places there are large numbers of 
, adults who can not read, and many who are 
classed as "able to read and write," read so 
poorly as to get very little out of what they 
read. The "literacy test" would put many 
of our people out if they were dependent up- 
on education for a place among us. We bid 
the "moonlight schools" God speed if they 
can do anything for us. The pressing need of 
the hour is that our people learn to read and 
that they learn to read intelligently — under- 
standingly. 

Two Bills Now Before Congress propose to 
exclude from the mails such periodicals as 
shall publish any "scandalous, scurrilous, in- 
decent or immoral books, pamphlets, pictures, 
prints, engravings, lithographs, photographs, 
or other publications which are, or are repre- 
sented to be, a reflection on any form of re- 
ligious worship practced or held sacred by 
any citizens of the United States." The bills 
also -provide that "the Postmaster General 
shall make the necessary rules and regulations 
to exclude such matter from the mails." 

Now this all sounds very good to one who 
reads without thinking what a jumble it really 
is. It is in fact a regular Trojan Horse. 
We already have ample laws which will ex- 
clude from the mails all obscene, scandalous 
and immoral literature. The public has been 
amply protected by legislation in this respect. 
These things are mentioned in the proposed act 
to sugar-coat the mischief that the author of 
this bill intends to foist upon the country by 
the piwer to exclude from the mails "other 
publications which are, or are represented to 
be, a reflection on any form of religious wor- 
ship practiced or held sacred by any citizens 
of the United States." Now, wouldn't Mor- 
monism, or any other abomination in the name 
of religion, find shelter and flourish under the 
protecting wing of such a law? It is signifi- 
cant that the authors of the proposed legis- 
lation are Roman Catholics. Let every form 
of religious belief and practice take its chances 
in the open, under the blazing light of public 
criticism. That which can not survive the 
criticism of a free press and open speech is not 
fit to live. 

• » * • 

The Immigration Bill which has twice met 
its fate in a presidential veto, will surely now 
be allowed to rest awhile. This measure is pro- 
jected upon the false hypothesis that a literacy 
test is the supreme thing in citizenship. Mr. 
Taft and Mr. Wilson each take substantially 
the same position, maintaining that much of 
the best and most desirable element in foreign 
immigration would be excluded by such a law, 
while many of the most vicious would be ad- 
mitted. While it is true that immigration is 
a constant peril, the danger is not so - much 
from illiteracy as from vicious moral charac- 
ter which is largely due to unfavorable envir- 
onment in the old country. It has been the 
boast of America that here the oppressd and 
downtrodden may find, not only an escape from 
oppression, but an opportunity to pursue hap- 
pinss and high ideals. May it ever be so. 
The Christian Advocate (New York) comment- 
ing on the action of President Wilson, says : 

"The President is right in assuming that 
not until he has received the mandate of his 
fellow citizens, expressed through party action 
at least, is he justified in giving his approval 
to a measure which he believes is open to se- 
rious objection. The literacy test embodied in 
this restrictive bill would shut out even those 
immigrants who desire to enter the United 
States for the very purpose of gaining that ele- 
mentary education which was denied them in 
their own lands. Furthermore, the refusal of 
immigrants who have been political offenders 
under despotic governments by people who 



glory in their ancestors' revolt against tyran- 
ny is an absurdity. Had either of these bar- 
riers been erected a hundred years ago, it 
would have deprived America of some of its 
most valuable citizens. Against pauperism, 
criminality, disease, mental delinquency and 
other evils we may well build invincible bul- 
warks. But the proposal to create restrictions 
which bear no relation to physical soundness, 
mental sanity or moral character should be 
flouted in the name of freedom and justice. 
Have our national legislators forgotten that 
God gave America a mission to the nations of 
the earth which is not yet finished?" 

William A. Sunday, the most sensational 
evangelist in the world today, and perhaps the 
most sensational in the history of the world, 
has been holding forth in Philadelphia for 
more than a month. We have been watching 
the reports with some degree of regularity as 
given in the Philadelphia American. Enor- 
mous crowds have attended, and while much 
criticism has been published, we -notice that 
most of the criticism is of his manner of 
preaching rather than of what he preaches. 
This we think is significant. Even in Old 
Testament times, the more aggressive prophets 
were accused of irregularities and criticised 
for apparently eccentric manners. John the 
Baptist drew crowds to his ministry who went 
out to see an eccentric prophet who dared 
to clothe himself in coarse garments and live 
abstemiously while speaking with the author- 
ity of a messenger from heaven. Jesus Him- 
self was blamed more for the how than for the 
what of his teaching, and suffered death finally 
under the charge of being a non-conf ormer. 

So the world goes, and we have about de- 
cided that Billy Sunday is going to be vindi- 
cated by what they accuse him of, his enemies 
being the principal witnesses in his favor. We 
notice that the bad people are against him, and 
a late tribute to the value and effectiveness 
of his ministry is the report current that Rich- 
mond does not want him to come there. Like 
the people of Gadara, they would show no hos- 
pitality to a man who would run the hogs out. 

Another thing we notice is that, in Philadel- 
phia and vicinity, the Methodists, Baptists, 
Presbyterians and other evangelical churches 
endorse his work, and say that he is sound in 
doctrine as well as in his attitude toward the 
evils of society in general. In fact, great so- 
ciety leaders, of whom there are not a few in 
Philadelphia, have been much impressed and 
sobered by his ministry. While Mr. Sunday's 
methods are quite sensational and expensive, 
we should not forget that nothing short of these 
perhaps would so attract attention in a large 
city as to arouse great public interest. Mr. 
Sunday, no doubt, has his weaknesses like other 
men, but he is no reed shaken by the wind, 
and his work is telling mightily. 

* # # # 

The Sunday School Lesson for February 
14th is one of more than ordinary interest to 
old and young. The subject is "God's Call 
to Service," suggested by the call of Samuel 
as recorded in 1 Sam. 1 :24-28. Parents ought 
to read this lesson aloud to their children and 
see that it is duly impressed upon their minds. 
The case of Samuel is typical. To every chlid 
there comes, early in life, the call of God. Not 
in audible voice, but a voice, nevertheless, which 
speaks to the inner ear of the soul, and it is ex- 
ceedingly important that the child be encour- 
aged to respond — : to yield — to the divine call. 
There should be no effort to repress the child 
when he shows a disposition to yield to the 
call of God. Some parents make the mistake 
of supposing that the child in tender years 
does not know what he is about when he express- 
es a desire to take upon himself the vows of the 
church. Remember, the call came to Samuel 
when he was but four years old. 

Commenting Upon This Divine Call one of 

our exchanges says: 

"This incident gives opportunity for a word 
or two about the call to the ministry. In 
earlier days mothers were wont to feel that 
among the priceless boons of motherhood was a 
child who might become a minister. In Scot- 
land the usual salutation to children was not, 



'How are you?' but, 'What are you looking 
forward to?/ It was only the occasional fam- 
ily which did not furnish at least one candi- 
date to say, 'The ministry.' As one outcome 
ihe leaders of Scottish national life have been 
almost uniformly ministers; and just because 
of the emphasis upon this particular calling 
the tone of religious life in Scotland has been 
more serious and aggressive than among other 
peoples. 

God's call may come in the family habit of 
prayer and serious converse. It may come in 
ihe affectionate prayer and pressure of pater- 
nal concern; it may come in the consciousness 
of a passion for tne gospel and for men and 
it may come through the voice of dear friends 
or the Church. JMo sincere man, no man who 
rigidly or rigorously tells the truth to himself, 
who studies himself in the light of his own 
needs and qualifications^ who walks close with 
God and keeps an ear attent to spiritual voices 
and leadings will ever want the clear and con- 
vincing assurance of his call to the ministry." 
# # # # 

There is No Great Change in the war situa- 
tion. During the past weeii a desperate battle 
lias developed in Poland and in the Carpathians 
between the Russian and German armies and 
the Austro-Hungarians and Germans. The ar- 
mies in North France and in Flanders are com- 
paratively quiet. There is much concern just 
now in diplomatic circles as to the possible 
effect of Germany's determination to place the 
seas surrounding the British Isles in the war 
zone. 



CALL FOR BUILDING FUND 

In this column we are printing the call 
of Rev. Dr. J, C. Rowe, presiding elder of the 
Charlotte District, for the raising of the district 
pledge on the Advocate building. We greatly 
appreciate the interest the district manifested 
in making this pledge and the interest Dr. 
Rowe and his pastors are showing. The Shel- 
by District also made a pledge of $350. by a 
unanimous vote in the District Conference, and 
divided the amount among the charges. The 
Greensboro District pledged $500. and pro- 
ceeded at once to cover the amount by indi- 
vidual and church pledges. Only a few of these 
charges in the three districts have made any 
payment, although one-half was due in Novem- 
ber. In view of the peculiar financial situation 
we have not pressed these collections, but times 
are manifestly easier now and we hope to hear 
from all at an early day. In other districts 
only individual pledges were taken, with a 
few exceptions where pastors and laymen pres- 
ent pledged their congregatiens. Many of these 
pledges are still behind. 

Will not every one concerned respond to this 
call and let us have the amount of their 
pledge ? Several hundred dollars already paid 
in is now in the savings bank drawing only 
4 per cent, interest, whereas, if we had the 
amounts now past due we could make a pay- 
ment on our note and thus cancel a large por- 
tion of the note on which we are paying 6 per- 
cent. The reader will understand that the 
money was borrowed from an endowment fund 
and we can not make a payment till we are 
ready to cancel at least one-half of our debt. 

We will greatly appreciate prompt attention 
to this, and all will rejoice when we can see 
this splendid building and plant entirely free 
from debt. 



PREACHERS OF CHARLOTTE DISTRICT 

Dear Brethren : — As you know, the Charlotte 
District Conference last year agreed to raise 
five hundred dollars in the district, to be ap- 
plied to the Advocate building in Greensboro. 
The conference instructed the district stewards 
to apportion it to the several charges in the 
district, with the other collections. This has 
been done. Please raise this collection for the 
Advocate and send the money to Rev. H. M. 
Blair as soon as you can. The Advocate has an 
elegant building, and it is the property of the 
Western North Carolina Conference. This is 
one of the most meritorious enterprises of the 
Conference, and well deserves this service. 

J. C. Rowe. 



Page Four 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 11, 191 



| CONTRIBUTIONS I 

IN CONCLUSION 

Forde Otts 
' ' Now in conclusion let me warn — ' ' 
Our preacher said one Sunday morn. 
He closed the Bible with a flop 
And laid the hymn-book square on top 
And leaned against the carved pulpit 
"There's one more thought before I quit — " 
The congregation in accord 
Prepared to hear the "final word — " 
The deacon shifted on his seat 
As "Brethren, I must here repeat — " 
And then our thoughts we did corrall 
To hear "something that's practical — " 
Until an ache crept up our spine 
"While here I'll add another line — " 
We knit our brows like some ascetic 
To hear the final homiletic 
About old Abraham and Buz 
And every prophet ever was 
To Revelation's pending doom, 
And then we had ' ' Praise God from whom — ' ' 

Conclusion 
0 brother, this ineptitude 
Of forty minutes to conclude ! 
You'll find out if you inquire 
That ' ' a long spoke makes a long tire, ' ' 
And what is worse (Please me excuse) 
It fills your church with empty pews. 



THE OLD TIME AND THE MODERN 
COUNTRY CHURCH 

A. W. Cline 

The country church of today is not the coun- 
try church of fifty years ago ; yea, I might say 
twenty years ago, and too I might add that it 
doesn't take a close observer to notice a mark- 
ed change in the past ten years. The trans- 
ition is rapid and their must be some cause for 
it. You ask me what I mean when I say there 
has been a change. Your old grandfather or 
grandmother who has attended the same church 
for seventy-five years can answer the question 
more intelligently than I can ; in fact, my idea 
for this sketch was obtained from a conversa- 
tion with a godly old man who deplores the 
fact that religion has lost its power, not only 
in some city churches, but scores of rural 
churches as well. Of course this condition is 
not universal, but it is more prevalent in some 
localities than others. I know country church- 
es that only a few years ago were alive with 
the gospel of Christ and now they are spir- 
itually dead. To attend a service in these 
churches now seems more like you were present 
at a lecture in some public hall than the place 
where the egospel was being expounded. The 
atmosphere reminds one of a December day. 

If the above is true there must be some 
cause for it. Let us see if we can't find a few 
of the causes for the present drift of many 
churches away from the old time religious cus- 
toms. How many of the younger readers ever 
attended a service where no organ was used, but 
some saintly old man "raised" the tune of 



perienced the love of God in his or her heart, 
and who is uneducated in music should be de- 
barred from holding the exalted position of 
church organist. Better throw the organ out 
of doors than let such a person kill the 
power of the service. How many have made 
the remark that if a certain person is organ- 
ist or sings in the choir "I am going to stay 
away." Ask an old person to compare the re- 
vival of fifty years ago with the one of today. 
Young as I am I can remember when the altar 
wouldn't hold the penitents when the invita- 
tion was given in a revival meeting in the home 
church and when the invitation was closed 
some good old Christian knelt beside each 
"mourner" and pointed him to the way of life. 
Only a few years ago I spent a few days at 
home during the summer revival. The pastor, 
one of the best in the state, had labored faith- 
fully for a week and when a call for penitents 
was made after a heart-touching sermon, there 
was not a response out of the congregation of 
several hundred, the majority young people 
and known to-be out of Christ. Won't some- 
one tell us why the gospel has lost its hold on 
the people in this particular section ? 

What is true of the section just mentioned is 
true of hundreds of sections throughout this 
and other states. Something must be done and 
that quick, or the church will be nothing more 
than a mere playhouse. 

Now, let us see if we can't find a few things 
that look like they are responsible for the 
state of affairs mentioned above. Some time 
during the meeting referred to the pastor asked 
the heads of families in which family prayer 
was held, at least once a day, to raise their 
hands. Not a hand went up. He then want- 
ed to know how many had occasional prayers 
in their homes, and one out of the entire con- 
gregation responded. Oh ! may the day has- 
ten when a family altar will be erected in every 
Christian home throughout the land. No mat- 
ter how far from home the young man who 
was raised in a home where family prayer was 
a daily event wanders, the influence of that 
home will follow him, and no doubt some day 
be the means of leading him to Christ. My 
opinion is, that the abolishment and failure to 
establish the family altar is responsible for the 
greater part of the loss of interest in the 
churches of today. 

What has become of the old-time pastor that 
threw his saddle bags across his horse and start- 
ed for the neighborhood of one of his country 
churches about Thursday before his appoint- 
ment on Sunday? His coming was looked for- 
ward to with a high degree of pleasure by ev- 
ery member of the family he visited. He 
would usually spend several days visiting 
among "the members," generally from Thurs- 
day until Monday. Now the preacher hurries 
out on Sunday morning and preaches. Some- 
times he will wait to take dinner with some one 
near the church before hurrying back to town ; 
but usually he hurries back to get ready for 
his evening appointment at his town or sub- 
urban church where the greater part of his 
time is spent. I know pastors that have served 
country churches for several years and have 
never darkened the doors of some members of 
their congregations. In many places today the 



"Nearer My God to Thee," "What a Friend 

We Have in Jesus," "Jesus Lover of My /eountry church is only considered a side line. 
Soul," and other of the old hymns that will , Pastors, give your country churches more at- 
live throughout ages. If you attended such a j tention and the best fruits of your labor will 
service and didn't feel the power of the Holy ' be found there 



Spirit you were indeed a hardened sinner. 
Such a service was enough to touch the heart 
of an infidel. 

When I refer to the service without the or- 
gan don't understand me as being opposed to 
its use in the churches; far from that. I be- 
lieve the organ can be made a great power for 
good if the proper person is organist. In many 
country churches the advent of the organ was 
the death of the church. Now let us consider 
the best possible way for the organ to be used 
for the glory of God. Of course with the com- 
ing of the organ the old gray-headed "tune 
pitcher" had to take a back seat, or at least he 
wasn't needed any more, and some squeeky- 
squawky-voieed girl who has taken two or three 
lessons in instrumental music was raised up to 
take his place. It is not the organ but the or- 
ganist that kills the religious fervor of a ser- 
vice. I do think that any one who has not ex- 



Asheboro, N. C. 



A NEW PERIODICAL 

E. H. Rawlings 
Have you seen it yet, brethren? Maybe it 
has not reached you generally. But a little 
after the first of January it will reach your 
charges, coming to all your superintendents. 
It is The Missionary Messenger, and its object 
is more than suggested in the sub-title that 
reads, "Monthly Program and Bulletin for the 
Use of the Sunday School Superintendent and 
the Chairman of the Missionary Committee." 
For some time past a quarterly missionary pro- 
gram for "Missionary Day" in the Sunday 
school has been given in The Teachers' Maga- 
zine, in connection with and on the topic of the 
quarterly missionary lesson. But a very gen- 
eral demand has come to us for an attractive, 
workable program for each of the remaining 



eight "Missionary Days" in the year. Thi 
leaflet periodical furnishes that monthly pre 
gram. And it reaches every Sunday school, a 
least every school the address of whose superir 
tendent has been furnished the Sunday schoc 
office at Nashville through the pastor's repor 
to Conference. The general Sunday Schoc 
Board by special resolution requested the Con 
ference Sunday School Boards to appropriat 
each the money needed to send this program t 
every superintendnt in its borders, and, a 
far as we know every Board has made the ap 
propriation. Indeed, as soon as the request wa 
stated to a Sunday School Board the member 
recognized in The Messenger the very thing th 
Sunday schools have been looking for, an< 
most cheerfully made the appropriation at once 
An Interesting History 
The Missionary Messenger is not an acci 
dent, however. It is rather a striking an< 
quite logical part of a carefully thought ou 
missionary plan for the Sunday school. A 
a Church we have had a Missionary plan fo: 
the Sunday school of one sort and another fo: 
thirty years and more. The history is a mos 
interesting one. At first the Discipline said 
' ' Let every Sunday school so far as practicabL 
be organized into a missionary society." Bu 
after several quadrenniums somebody in th 
General Conference saw that a wrong cue wa: 
given in the wording, and cut out "So far a: 
practicable." A little later the prepositioi 
"into" fell under condemnation. Somebody 
had the discernment to see that it ought not t< 
be necessary to change the Sunday schoo 
"into" something other than it is in its essen 
tial character in order to make it missionary 
and so substitute "as" for the "into." Anc 
then, finally at the last General Conference i' 
was still further seen that it should not ever 
take the organization to make a Sundaj 
school missionary. Ideally the school is mis 
sionary by its very existence, and so the new 
Discipline reads, "Let every Sunday schoo. 
be regarded as a missionary society." 
Our Joy Task 
But the changes indicated above are not the 
only changes that have been made in our mis 
sionary plan in thirty years. To appreciat< 
how far we have come, one has only to read the 
little clause in the Discipline of the earlj 
" 80 's " and with that contrast the splendid par- 
agraph 264 in our last Discipline, and to know 
that this paragraph is not all but has its side 
lights and stays in other paragraphs and, in 
deed, is itself only the charter of a plan agreec 
upon by two general boards and that has gon< 
on improving till, through the legislation oi 
1914, in which the General Conference gave 
practically everything asked for by the Boards 
we have a missionary plan for the Sundaj 
school than which no church in this country has 
a better. The Sunday school shares in th( 
missionary offering while the cause of missions 
has an open field in the Sunday school; the 
Educational Secretary of the Board of Missions 
is a member ex-officio of the Sunday Schoo 
Board, and the Sunday School Editor is a mem 
ber of the Mission Board. All the secretaries 
recognize in the revised policy a most attrac 
tive and stimulating feature of Sunday schoo' 
organization not only, but our very best single 
opportunity for educating the Church in the 
great business of world evangelization, and are 
glad to work at it themselves and to help super- 
intendents, pastors, presiding elders and all lo 
cal leaders work at it as the one great joy tasls 
of our present church organization. 

What Is a Missionary Sunday School? 
The policy is a comprehensive one involving 
many features that will follow out logically ir 
the faithful application. But a few things are 
cardinal and outstanding. There is the Mis- 
sionary Committee that is to be appointed by 
the superintendent, and about whose appoint- 
ment there is no longer any option. There is 
the monthly "Missionary Day" on which the 
work is to be done, and that is also required by 
the discipline. A denominational lesson 
wrought into the international schedule, comes 
once a quarter. The problem of a program foi 
Missionary Day is solved by the Missionary 
Messenger, and the way is wide-open for an as- 
sault upon the vexed problem of the offering 
I say "vexed" because that matter of the 
offering has been mightily vexed as well as 



February 11, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Five 



genuinely vital. It would not seem so, and 
many who take the offering think this the 
easiest feature of the policy and so far from be- 
ing a problem, itself solves other problems. 
Now Is It Right? 

This is what I mean. For a quadrennium the 
offering had been increasing at the rate of about 
$10,000 a year till last year, when the increase 
suddenly leaped upward to $30,000, making the 
entire missionary offering in the Sunday school 
as reported in Conference Journals, about 
$200,000. That is splendid, but nothing like as 
fine as it looks. Oh, that fly in the ointment — 
why should there so often be ! "Well, we found 
that this big increase in the Sunday school had 
not greatly helped the income of the Mission 
Board. At the end of the year when the 
"tug" came, as.it always comes, the stewards, 
finding a shortage and looking around for some 
loose money, espied the missionary offering of 
the Sunday school, the pastor, under the pres- 
sure, consenting, and simply have taken our 
money and used it to pay missionary and oth- 
er assessments upon the congregation. Now, 
brethren, that ought not so to be. And for a 
simple reason that alone should be absolutely 
conclusive. Our Foreign Mission assessment 
upon the Church, which is only 25 cents a mem- 
ber — till the last General Conference only 20 
cents — ■ is simply insufficient to do the work we 
are trying to do. Listen — does this mean any- 
thing? If no church in the connection had 
done more for missions last year than raise its 
assessment, we not only would not be sending 
out new missionaries but would now be call- 
ing in about a fourth of our entire force or 
else asking the banks to carry us for $150,000. 

But better even than that, is this reason. 
When a Sunday school takes our list of specials 
and, nobly pushing aside the little 25 cents as- 
sessment from before its eyes, takes a native 
worker, a bed in a hospital, a circuit, a mis- 
sionary, as many are gladly doing, carrying it 
because of the school's vital and definite inter- 
est in the work, the whole spirit of the service 
is changed, and the business of missions in that 
Sunday school is nothing less than transfigured. 
And all this is why the General Conference 
in the New Discipline says, ' ' It is urged that as 
far as possible, the missionary offering in the 
Sunday school go as free-will and not used to 
pay the missionary assessment upon the con- 
gregation. ' ' 

Another Problem — Who Is He? 

Now that is our policy. What is our prob- 
lem? "Well, I tell you what nearly everybodv 
says. In institutes and correspondence it is 
a testimony almost universal. "We cannot get 
our superintendent interested," "He will not 
appoint the committee or name the day," "And 
when he names the day he forgets or slurs it 
over, ' ' and so we were just about settling down 
to calling the superintendent our problem, 
when we fell upon a better way of looking at 
him. He is a busy man. If not, he ought not 
to be superintendent. He has his hands and 
heart full of the things he is alreadv Wine to 
get done in his school, and any new thing pro- 
nosed frightens him. even when it is as good a 
thing as missions. But we know him and know 
that he is wide-open to suggestions, when wise- 
ly, kindly and persistently made. Don't give 
him up. Suddenly the thing will break upon 
him and he will show himself the key that un- 
locks the problem — the one man that can lead 
his school into this open door for missionary 
education in the Church. 

But after all, it is a fact that, if the super- 
intendent is the key, the one man that can turn 
that key is the pastor. Yes, this is added to the 
pastor's other thousand and one obli- 
gations. But he usually knows that it is oppor- 
tunity for him as most of his obligations are, 
and gladly says the skilled word. that, going 
further with the superintendent than anybody 
else's word, gets the plan started in every Sun- 
day school. This is why the new Discipline 
connects the pastor with well-nigh every fea- 
ture of the missionary policy, making him ulti- 
mately responsible for its faithful application 
in every church. 

A Purple Cornucopia 

Now all the above is expressly told about in 
the literature of the policy. No, I would not 
frighten anybody off with any menace that the 
word "literature" might covertly carry. It is 



a better thing than that. It is a beautiful 
purple cornucopia. I mean the envelope that 
used to go out carrying the missionary litera- 
ture and "helps" for the Sunday school has 
been overhauled throughout, all its pieces short- 
ened, brightened, sharpened, and all with refer- 
ence to the practical demands of people that 
are working at missions in the Sunday school, 
and then on the address side of our big en- 
velope is the same legand "Missions in The 
Sunday School, ' ' but heralding a beautiful cor- 
nucopia — a horn of usable helps for the mission- 
ary policy in the Sunday school. This goes 
free to anybody that is working at the plan. 
The Hour Has Struck 
This "piece" has taken more space than 
was intended and makes strong claims for the 
importance of this missionary policy. But not 
too strong. When we rise above all the entan- 
glement of Boards and policies of secretaries 
and promoters, every man whose heart is right 
knows well enough that the business of missions 
is not the business of a secretary or board — 
the buiness of world-evangelization, as the one. 
burden of the Master, is the business of the 
whole Church. But if the world is ever saved, 
the interest of more than a third of the mem- 
bership of the Church must be enlisted. The 
Church must be made missionary. But breth- 
ren, there is only one way to make the church 
missionary. It is a noble work our women have 
done and they will keep on doing it and will 
do it better. The laymen are coming to their 
own. But if, overlapping, transcending and 
binding together all sections in one great cul- 
tural plan, we finally make the whole Church 
missionary, we shall have to reach and train 
the Church when and where it can be trained 
and that is in the Sunday school. The hour 
has struck for missions in the Sunday school. 
All conditions conspire, all forces turn that 
way, and contribute their share. Let us not 
miss our chance. But now at the beginning of 
the quadrennium, at the beginning of the new 
Conference year, when the niche of need and 
opportunity is wide open, let's all fall to and 
by putting on this simple missionary plan, lift 
a little, each in his place, in the great and glo- 
rious business of making the Church we love 
missionary. 



IF I WERE AN AUTOCRAT 

* By Rev. S. A. Steel, D. D. 

But I am not, so nobody need be uneasy. I 
had nothing to do at Conference but enjoy it, 
study it, and vote steadily, as I did to the 
end against division. I saw many things to 
commend, and quite a number to mend. We 
were all pleased with the firm, courteous, and 
kindly manner in which the presiding bishop 
handled a delicate and complicated situation, 
and guided the craft safely through the rapids. 
I was particularly impressed with Dr. Ivey's 
suggestion of the need of a board on the circula- 
tion of our Church literature. We have so many 
wheels now that it almost makes a pastor's head 
swim to keep them all whirling; but it really 
looks like such a "board" might float some 
things. The metaphor is mixed, perhaps, but. 
as Bishop Kavanaugh used to say about mixed 
metaphors, "the idee is clear." But I started 
to write about some of the things we ought 
to mend. 

If I were an autocrat, with power to enforce 
my instructions, I would compel eighty percent, 
of the preachers to take a course in voice cul- 
ture, and advise the other twenty to do so. Some 
spoke so* low they could not be heard half a 
dozen seats away; most spoke so indistinctly, 
that when loud and strong enough, they could 
be understood with difficulty. Now there is no 
excuse for this. It is idle to lay it on "poor 
acoustics in the building, or blame nature for 
a bad voice. It is due entirely to negligence ; 
and this is due either to laziness, or to a lack 
of appreciation of the importance of the voice 
as the instrument with which we work. Didn 't 
Demosthenes have a poor voice to begin with? 
Tt seems to me I heard that Dr. J. M. Bucklev. 
for many years the distinguished editor of the 
New York Christian Advocate, and admitted to 
be the champion debater on the floor of his Gen- 
eral Conference, took a course in voice training 
only a few years ago. If a man past sixty will 
do that, what is the matter with you? Do you 
say you have no opportunity to get a teacher ? 



That makes me tired — everlastingly wanting 
help. Get a move on you, get you a book on elo- 
cution, and study and practice till you master 
the art of clear, distinct, ringing speech. I do 
not offer my own voice as a model, but have 
been heard by ten thousand people, and I got 
my voice calling hogs. In the language of the 
man from Arkansas, ' ' Now laugh, darn ye ! " 

If I were an autocrat I would not accept the 
excuse those young preachers offered for failing 
to bring up their studies that they had trouble 
with their eyes. That won 't do. As this sounds 
a little hard on them, I must justify the judg- 
ment by citing my own experience with eye 
trouble and study. When I was in my Sopho- 
more year in Emory and Henry College, I had 
a severe spell of measles. The disease settled 
my eyes, perhaps weak from over-study. While 
I was in bed with the measles, I received notice 
of my election as chaplain of the University of 
Virginia, and also of my selection to preach the 
Commencement sermon for one of our leading 
colleges. (By the way, how many 'Sophomores' 
have such honors thrust upon them now. ) When 
I got up from the measles, though I faced such 
tasks, I was forbidden to look in a book, and I 
did not. But I preached that Commencement 
sermon, won my sweetheart, getting her prom- 
ise the night after I preached, went to the Uni- 
versity and preached to one of the most intel- 
lectual audiences in America twice every Sun- 
day for a year without ever seeing print. In 
my audience sat such men as John B. Minor, 
and B. L. Gildersleeve, and F. H. Smith, and 
Scheie de Vere, and among the students such 
men as Thomas Nelson Page and Henry Carter 
Stuart, now the noble Governor of Virginia, and 
many others who have since rose to high places. 
It was no easy task for a practically blind boy ; 
but I did it, and took some of the courses in 
the university. Some charming young ladies in 
the University read to me, and friendly students 
read aloud so I could hear, and in this way I 
made it go. 

So you see I have a right to speak on this 
point. Paul had to have help with his eyes, 
but there is no hint that he asked to be excused 
for not keeping up his studies on that account. 
He found people, just as I did, who were not 
only willing, but anxious to help him by lend- 
ing him the use of their own. One of the best 
preachers I heard in my boyhood was a blind 
man. He had a negro servant who read to him. 
and I heard my father say it was hard to tell 
which knew the most, the preacher or the negro 
reader. I knew the "Blind Chaplain" of Con- 
gress, Rev. W. H. Milburn, and was always as- 
tonished at his familiarity both with standard 
and current literature. Remember Milton. By 
all means take care of your eyes. By resting 
mine for a year, sternly resisting the urgent de- 
mand for their use under trying circumstances, 
I saved them, and am still using them. But 
don't let it interfere with your study. 

One young brother told me he got behind be- 
cause he had so much visiting to do. That 
won't work either. Paul went "from house 
to house," but kept up his studies. Who ever 
moved more constantly and steadily than Wes- 
ley, yet he was an incessant student. Visiting 
is important and must not be neglected; but 
your rating as a minister is going to be based 
on your ability as a preacher, the grade of your 
appointment determined by that; and you 
can't preach unless you study, and study hard. 
So tell your wife, and, if you have not yet got 
such a treasure, tell you sweetheart, that I beg 
her to make you get busy, and tear the heart 
out of those books before Conference. If you 
don't you will be a scrub, and that is all there 
is to it; a sort of pius pony. Now and then 
nature endows a man with a degree of power 
that enables him to dispense with study; but 
even then his power would be immensely in- 
creased by mental culture. To the average 
man, education is a necessary condition of suc- 
cess. And while no preacher who expects to 
be anything will think of restricting his read- 
ing and study to the Conference Course, yet 
that course if thoroughly mastered, will make a 
man a fairly well educated man. 

I do not take much stock in your "Corre- 
pnondence School" method of study. The best 
way— 

But my, I must stop, or ye new editor will 
faint. — Southern Christian Advocate, 



» 



Page Six 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 11, 1{ 



| INTERESTING NEWS FROM FIELD 



NOTES AND PERSONALS 

— Mrs. J. D. Arnold, of Waynesville, visited 
relatives in Greensboro last week. 

— Rev. A. L. Stanford, pastor of First 
Church, Hickory, has recently returned from 
an extended visit to Florida. 

— The Board of Missions of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church has established an illustrated 
magazine called the World's Outlook. 

— Rev. T. A. Groce requests us to thank 
Rev. C. A. "Wood, Weaverville and H. Redwood 
& Co., Asheville, for $5.00 each on the Pisgah 
church fund. 

— We regret to learn that Miss Gertrude 
Edwards, daughter of Rev. J. J. Edwards, of 
Cool Springs circuit, has been quite sick with 
iagrippe. We are glad to know that she is 
rapidly recovering. 

— Mrs. Nancy Shuping. an aged and highly 
respected member of our church in Burke 
county, passed away at the home of her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Woodward, near the State Hospi- 
tal, last week. The funeral was conducted on 
Tuesday by Rev. A. C. Swafford. 

— Rev. W. R. Minter, who, for several years, 
has served as pastor of the Presbyterian 
church in Lincolnton, has accepted a call to a 
church in Austin, Texas, and will leave for 
Austin to take up his new work about the 15th 
of March. 

— The Davenport College Chorus gave a sa- 
cred concert at the Presbyterian church in Le- 
noir on last Sunday night. Davenport has a 
splendid music department which is constantly 
growing under the efficient direction of Prof. 
Birmingham. 

— We have learned with deep regret of the 
death of Rev. J. K. McCain, of the South Caro- 
lina Conference, which occurred at his home at 
Gray Court last week. Brother McCain was 
the uncle of Rev. C. L. McCain, of our Con- 
ference, who will have the sympathy of all the 
friends in this hour of bereavement. 

— A late item from the Franklin Press an- 
nounces that the U. S. Government has just 
paid for the forty-third tract acquired, under 
the Weeks Law, in the area designated as the 
Savannah North, which comprises the southeast 
portion of Macon, the southern part of Jack- 
son and southwestern part of Transylvania 
counties. The purchases consummated aggre- 
gate 856,689 acres, and all lie in Macon county. 

— West Market Street church, this city, al- 
ways has large congregations, Dr. Byrd's 
strong preaching holding the grip upon the 
people. A new feature in the program of ser- 
vices is a monthly choral entertainment on 
Sunday evening. For this month the service 
was held last Sunday night with the Greens- 
boro College Choral Class in charge. The au- 
dience packed the great auditorium to its ut- 
most capacity. These services are capable of 
being made a great blessing to the church and 
we trust the experiment will be entirely satis- 
factory. 

—Rev. G. C. Rankin, D. D., editor of the 
Texas Christian Advocate, passed to his reward 
on Tuesday of last week. His death was whol- 
ly unexpected and. was a great shock to all 
Texas Methodism as well as the whole church. 
Doctor Rankin was well known throughout the 
church and was a man who had impressed 
himself upon the whole church as few men 
within the last quarter of a century. At the 
time of the organization of our Conference he 
was pastor of Central Church, Asheville. and 
was considered one of the strongest men ever 
in that pu)pit. Many people still in that 
church will share deeply the grief that is felt 
because Dr. Rankin is no more. After serv- 
ing pastorates in Kansas City and in Texas, he 
became, editor of the Texas Christian Advocate 
about seventeen years ago, and has continued 
in that work to the present, making a profound 
impression upon the church by his work as edi- 
tor. The whole Southern Methodist press shares 
in the sense of bereavement because of his 
death. 



From West Concord — We are making prog- 
ress, were kindly received when we arrived. Of 
course we left good friends at Bethel, but we 
found good ones here at Concord also. AVe 
have not had any favorable weather since we 
came here, yet we have had good services all 
the while. Almost the entire congregation fell 
upon us Saturday night and gave us a severe 
blow, yet we were able to be out and conduct 
services as usual Sunday. They came as a com- 
plete surprise to us and left us many things. 

I have never served a more loyal people than 
here at Concord. Our work is in fine shape. 

R. K. Brady. 



Spring Creek Charge — We closed a very suc- 
cessful meeting Sunday morning, Feb. 7th, at 
rv-H-- ? p">g Hnml. The spiritual life of the 
whole church has been quickened. About thir- 
ty were converted. Some twenty-five were re- 
claimed. Eighteen united with the church at 
Ottinger's Chapel. Four or five will join at 
Paint Rock, with six or eight at Antioch. We 
are in a meeting at Paint Rock. Pray for us 
that the Lord may bless the people at this 
place. Yours for victory, 

J. R. Warren. 



Shepherd's Church, Troutman Ct— The 

meetings of one week closed last night. We 
had with us Rev. G. W. Fink, pastor of Rhod- 
hiss station. Brother Fink is used of God in 
an extraordinary way. He is a good preacher, 
a man of strong faith, who gives the glory to 
God, utterly devoid of the cranky and the sen- 
sational, one of the very finest spirits that I 
have ever known, and withal, a very efficient 
evangelist. 

It will be of interest to many to know that 
this splendid, new and commodious house of 
worship stands on historic ground. In 1802 a 
kind of transient camp-meeting was held here. 
8.000 to 10,000 people were present. There 
were 262 wagons, with other vehicles. There 
were four stands, or places for preaching. Many 
were refreshed and many reclaimed, and 
many rejoiced in a new found love. It contin- 
ued from Friday to Tuesday. 

It was under the auspices of the Presby- 
terian Church. There were present 23 preach- 
ers — 14 presbyterians, 3 Methodists, 2 Baptists, 
2 Lutherans, 1 Protestant Episcopal and 1 
Dutch Calvinist. The place was then known 
as The Cross Roads church, but later the prop- 
erty was owned by a Mr. Shepherd and was 
afterwards known as Shepherd's Cross Roads. 
It is now known as Shepherd's, not only by 
the Methodist church, but also by the Southern 
Railway Company and by our Postoffice Depart- 
ment. 

So far as can be tabulated the results of the 
meetings are as follows : 41 found peace with 
God ; 18 members have been received. Other 
candidates already committed for church mem- 
bership, with others expected to come — in all 
about 25 members expected, besides those that 
will enter other communions. Thus the seal of 
God rests upon the church. There is no doubt 
but that the hand of God is upon us at Shep- 
herd's. Very truly, 

Joseph J. Eads," pastor. 

Troutman, N. C. 



most heartily and to His lovers who have 
ceived us so royally in His name. 

The Board of Stewards at Waynesville h 
already agreed before we came to increase 
pastor's salary $200.00. We can take to o 
selves no credit for this fine forward move, 1 
to them belongs the glory. 

Brother Cordell, our presiding elder, 1 
one of the biggest and hardest fields in < 
Conference. This rainy winter, cold 
changeable, has been trying on him. But 
is doing things. Our missionary conference 
Clyde the middle of last month was caught 
a snow storm, but it was good to be there. 1 
Holy Spirit whispered into our spirits so ma 
fine things while there that we felt our hea 
strangely warmed. Brother Siler and Brotl 
McLarty spoke as men moved by the H< 
Ghost. God is moving upon the sbuls of m 
in the Waynesville district and the spirit 
evangelism is stirring the servants of God 
go seek to save the lost. 

What e'er we do. or do not do; 
Dear Lord of truth, let us be true. 

Olin P. Ader. 



A Word from Waynesville — The capKln on 
the train said, "I'd rather be " ,/aller dog 
and sleep under the bed in my own home 
than to be a preacher and have to move as you 
men do." 

That is the way some nen see it. But there 
is another side of the jituation to see. Long 
years ago a Friend " ..d Brother of men passed 
through the ':or\a, and went His way, saying 
as u 3 left His lovers, "Let not your hearts 
be troubled .... I go to prepare a place for 
you." That Friend keeps His word in all 
worlds. And when we got to Waynesville we 
found He had gone before and prepared a 
place for ub here. We are thankful to Him 



Jefferson Circuit — Prof. W. L. Scott, one 
our local preachers, who has charge of the J 
ferson School, and myself, conducted a reviv 
during the holidays, at Mill Creek chur< 
This is Prof. Scott's home church. He help 
to build it with his own hands and mom 
It is a splendid country church. We had s< 
vices at 1 a. m. and 7 :30 p. m. Though t 
weather was inclement, the large house w 
very often full. There were a number of pi 
fessions and restorations and nine were rece: 
ed into the church. 

The first Sunday in January we tried to s 
every member of the Jefferson church to 
present for a special service. So after t 
Sunday school we had a love feast. It was t' 
first that many of the people had ever been i 
The Holy Spirit was present and was very e 1 
dent as He manifested Himself through t 
emotions and words of the people. Then 
preached and We all went out feeling that 
was good to have been there. 

On Saturday morning, the 9th of Januai 
Brother J. H. Bennett met a large crowd 
Bethany, for our first quarterly conference. ~V 
were all delighted with Brother Bennett frc 
start to finish. He preached Saturday ai 
Sunday at 11 a. m. and 7 p. m. Saturd 
afternoon he held a very interesting session 
the quarterly conference. He took the th 
and opportunity to explain to and enlight 
the church about several of the questions 
the Discipline. Sunday afternoon he condu< 
ed a Sunday school institute for us. On Mc 
day night, the 11th, he preached at Jeffers 
for us and met some of the folks who did not ; 
tend the quarterly conference. Brother Be 
nett is planning to help each pastor in the d 
trict who wants him, in a revival and to prea 
at least once in each chusch on the distri 
Also he is trying to arrange for Bishop Wat< 
house to visit our district during the year, 
has been thirty-five years since a bishop h 
visited this section of the church. 

I know that it will be of interest to all t 
preachers who have served in Ashe county 
learn that the Virginia-Carolina Railroad 
now completed and operating to West Jeff< 
son. This depot is two and a half miles frc 
Jefferson. This road is now being complet 
to Todd. It passes right through the Jeffers 
circuit, and if many people come to the pi 
posed new towns, we preachers and Christia 
will have a lot to do in trying to keep the 
in i_ )uch with the church. 

The Jefferson School, under the manageme 
of Prof. W. L. Scott, is getting along ve 
nicely. The dormitory has been opened recei 
ly and will be of much help to the scho 
Mn sic, Elocution and Domestic Science a 
now being taught in addition to the rogul 
graded and high school courses. 

E. P. Stabler. 



Statesville Circuit — After two pleasant ai 
we hope profitable years with the good peoj: 
of the Troutman charge (and let me say 
better people are found anywhere) we WC 
moved to the Statesville circuit ; so on t 
23rd of November we bade good-bye to the 



'I 



February 11, 1915 



NOKTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Seven 



good people and after a drive of seven miles 
we found some new friends of the North States- 
ville church at the new parsonage, with a nice 
warm dinner ready, to extend a welcome to 
their new pastor and his wife. Sometimes the 
way of the itinerant seems hard, yet to the true 
itinerant Methodist preacher there is a great 
deal of joy. For as he leaves old friends he 
always finds some new ones. So I will always 
thank God that he called me to the life of an 
itinerant Methodist preacher. But this is 
drifting from what I started to write. Let me 
get back to my subject. On the night of the 
24th of November while sitting, trying to think 
out plans for the new Conference year, there 
was heard a soft step on the front porch, as if 
some one was anxious to know why there was a 
stillness within ; but on investigation there was 
found to be in the yard near by a company of 
the good people of North Statesville, regard- 
less of denomination, waiting for the door to 
be opened, and before the preacher could collect 
his wits the dining table was being loaded 
with such things as are of use in the pantry 
of a Methodist parsonage. But that is not all ; 
there has not hardly a day passed since we 
came but there has come some token of thought- 
fulness from these good people ; so we are led 
to believe that the lines have fallen to us in a 
good place. We are here housed in a new 
parsonage in North Statesville, one among the 
best circuit parsonages, we think, in the Con- 
ference. The churches are somewhat scattered 
and some of them a good distance from the par- 
sonage, but to one • who enjoys horse-back rid- 
ing and with a good saddle horse, these dis- 
tances are soon covered. So as yet we have not 
missed a single appointment since Conference. 
Though the weather has been rough and roads 
bad, we have found some few people at every 
service. If there is anv business requiring 
haste and courage, we think it is the Lord's 
business, so we should not neglect it on ac- 
count of a little rain or snow. 

Our first quarterly conference was held with 
North Statesville, the 30th and 31st. Brother 
Mann was with us and gave us two good ser- 
mons which were enjoyed by all. There was 
a fairly good attendance of the official board, 
and after consultation, the salary was raised 
$100.00, so we take courage and press forward. 
May all the brethren pray for a great revival 
on the Statesville circuit this year, for we 
feel that we need it. 

Will you pardon me for a personal note? 
We received a message from a brother in 
Greenville, S. C, yesterday morning stating 
that Uncle John had passed away early that 
morning. The uncle referred to was a member 
of the South Carolina Conference, Rev. J. K. 
McCain. He had been a Methodist preacher 
for forty-five years, thirty-eight in the active 
work, for seven years on the superannuated 
list, caused from a wound in the knee during 
the Civil War. While this was not the cause 
of his death, it crippled him so as he, though 
he could not do the work of an itinerant 
preacher, but preached a great deal where op- 
portunities offered themselves during these sev- 
en years. As we write these lines they are 
laying his body in the cemetery at Gray Court, 
S. C. The good people of Gray Court, whom 
he had served for four years during his active 
ministry, gave him a nice home in which to 
spend his last days. If we had more people like 
them our superannuates would spend their last 
days in joy and gladness. We regret very much 
that we could not be present with the sorrowing 
ones. C. L. McCain. 



Conference Brotherhood 

The death of Rev. A. E. Wiley, who was a 
member of our Conference Brotherhood, re- 
quires that assessment No. 12 be usd to pay his 
claim. Therefore, on Feb. 3rd, 1915, assess- 
ment No. 13 was called for and due to be paid 
within sixty days from that date. This assess- 
ment will be retained in bank until needed to 
pav the next death claim. 

The following have paid assessment No. 13 : 
W. A. Wilson. J. D. Arnold, R. L. Melton, W. 
E. Poovey, G. D. Herman, R. M. Hoyle, J. 
H. Weaver, H. C. Sprinkle. M. F. Moores, P. 
L. Terrell, J. P. Hipps, C. S. Kirkpatrick, W. 
A. Newell, E. Myers, G. H. Christenberry, J. 



E. Thompson, E.G. Pusey, E. L. Bain, W. 
L. Dawson, J. T. Ratledge, W. H. Willis, 
W. L. Sherrill and A. G. Loftin. 

C. M. Pickens, Sec. and Treas. 
Spencer, N. C. 



Report of Treasurer of the Board of Missions 

Received on Assessments 

For'n H. & C. 



Asheville, Haywood St., E. M. Hoyle $ 88.00 

Davidson Ct, T. J. Houck 2.38 

Norwood, R. M. Taylor 20.00 



Total on assessment to Feb. 1 $ 90.38 $ 20.00 
Received on Specials 

Creston, J. I. Hickman $ 10.00 

Salisbury Dist, W. R. "Ware 10.00 

Hickory, First Church, W. I. Cald- 
well, Tr 100.00 

W. Li. Sherrill 10.00 

Hendersonville, F. B. Durfee 10.00 

Mooresville Sta., R .L. Snow,' Tr. . . 1.25 

Mt. Zion, R. L. Snow, Tr. . .1 5.00 

N. Wilkesboro Dist, J. H. Bennett 31.50 

NT. Wilkesboro, W. P. Kelly, Tr. . . 59.05 

Salisbury, First Ch., Frank Siler . . 25.00 

Iredell Ct., Frank Siler ■. 42.50 

Asheville, Haywood St., H. A. Dun- 
ham, Tr 13.75 

Lenoir St., M. H. Courtney 5.00 

Elkin, Frank Siler 62.75 

Walkertown, Frank Siler 14.00 

Shelby Station, Frank Siler 5.00 

Winston-Salem, West End, N. V. 

Stockton, Tr 350.00 33.33 



$463.75 $324.38 

Total receipts to Feb 1 $898.51 



In connection with this my first report for the 
year in the Advocate let me say a word about 
the remitances sent to me. Sometimes I get a 
check with no statement about how it is to go ex- 
cept ' ' for missions. If we are to keep our books 
straight we must know how to enter the remit- 
tances. So, brethren, when you send me a check 
please designate what it is for. Please state 
whether it is for "Foreign Assessment." 
"Home and Conference Assessment." or 
"Home Mission Special," or "Conference Mis- 
sion Special," or "Sundav School Contribu- 
tion on Assessment," or "Sunday School Con- 
tribution on Special." 

One other request: Brethren, send in your 
checks on missions and help to make this month- 
ly report interesting reading. 

R. M. Courtney. Treas. 

Winston-Salem, N. C, Feb. 1, 1915. 



A Pounding and Else 

Not long ago the good people of Trinity gave 
expression of their loyalty to the parsonage 
when they came in on the good wife, in my ab- 
sence, with a pounding that we will not forget' 
soon. They brought the substantials and not 
a few. These people don't do things by 
halves. No better people can be found any- 
where. We are delighted to live amonpc them. 
May the good Lord help me to be a faithful 
leader of this splendid people. 

The work seems to be moving on well, and 
there is quite a tendancy to go forward in fi- 
nances as well as in spiritual things. 

The angel of death has visited the charge and 
claimed three of the members. On Dec, 6th, 
that noble Christian wife and mother. Mollie 
S. Winston, was called to her reward. By 
the assistance of Rev. A. S. Raper, her former 
nastor, we laid her to rest in the cemetery at 
Mt. Vernon. Then, Jan. 20th, the spirit of Lu- 
vina Needham took its flight to be at rest with 
her Lord. She had been a faithful member 
of the church at Trinity. She had reached the 
age of 76 years. 

Again, on last Saturday, Jan. 29th, I was 
called to Mt. Vernon to hold a funeral ser- 
vice over the remains of old Sister Jane Gray, 
who had lived to the age of 90 vears. She was 
regular in attendance at the church until age 
prevented. E. N. Crowder. 

"He that giveth to the poor lendeth to the 
Lord." A good and safe place to take care 
of your money. 



Missionary Notes from Field Secretary 

Feb. 2-8, Tryon St., Charlotte, E. K. Mc- 
Larty. P. C. During parts of two days I at- 
tended the annual meeting of the Woman's 
Missionary Society of the Conference and 
studied its work. The attendance was ■ good 
and the high interest seemed sustained to the 
last. My message before the body was a dis- 
cussion of the "Correlation of the Missionary 
Forces of the Church," a topic assigned me by 
the Executive Committee. I advocated in a 
general wav the policy which I believe the Gen- 
eral Board to be working to and was glad to 
have Mrs. Steele, one of the educational secre- 
taries, present at the meeting, privately say to 
me that my positions had hor general indorse- 
ment. I remained over in Charlotte to preach 
at Tryon Street Sunday for Dr. McLarty, 
who was at Trinity College conducting the an- 
nual series of special meetings under auspices 
of the College Y. M. C. A. Dr. McLarty is 
soon to have the every-member canvass for 
specials carried by his church. Accordingly I 
did not take a public collection. By his per- 
mission and that of his missionary committee, 
I saw privately some of his members in the 
interest of the Conference Mission Emer<rf>nev 
Fund ; also some aid for Brother Dawson, with 
results as follows: Conference Mission Special 
cash and fonr-year subscriptions. $1,040.00; 
support of Brother Dawson, $200.00. I am 
not authorised to raise money for Brother 
Dawson. Ho is Conference, not Missionary, 
Evangelist. The Conference hopes that his work 
will be self-sn staining. The Committee on 
Evangelism will aid him if necessary. Brother 
E. A. Cole, a member of the Committee on 
Evangelism, requested that his subscription of 
$100.00 go to Brother Dawson in helping him 
to aret started. His brother, E. M. Cole, sub- 
scribed a similar amount for the same purpose. 
These subscriptions are not included in the 
ahove amount reported for Conference Mis- 
sions. 

J. Luther Snyder and John Pan! Lucas join- 
ed the number paying $50.00 a year for four 
years. 

Mrs. S. B. Tanner gave me a check for $100.- 
00 : Mrs. J. S. Spencer check for $50.00. 

B. D. Heath and Joseph McLaughlin a check 
each for $25.00. 

Smaller amounts made the total money re- 
ceipts $245.00. 



OLDEST METHODIST CHAPEL IN THE 
WORLD 

There can be little doubt that the oldest com- 
plete Methodist chapel in the world is Wesley's 
Chapel at Kingswood. Bristol, now in the hands 
of the reformatory committee, says the Meth- 
odist Recorder of London. Before its comple- 
tion, in 1740, the "new room in the horse fair," 
Bristol, had been opened. Only a part of that 
building now remains. The Kingswood Chapel, 
therefore, can maintain its claim, although it 
was erected at the beginning as a schoolhouse 
for the collier's children. After being in Meth- 
odist hands for more than one hundred years, 
it was sold in 1843, to the Kingswood reforma- 
tory, and is still used as their chapel. Its quaint 
interior contains Wesley's pulpit, and is redo- 
lent of old Methodist memories. Here was held 
the first Watch Night service on December 31, 
1740, from half-past eight until the new year 
dawned. Near by John Cennick preached in 
the open air — the first of John Wesley's lay 
helpers who dared tty obey the call of God to 
preach without waiting" for ordination. Al- 
though Howell Harris had already been preach- 
ing as a layman in Wales, we may yet say that 
the Methodist local preacher dates his origin 
ba^k to Kingswood on June 14, 1739. 

The reformatory committee has decided to 
clean and repair the old chapel. The original 
proposals woiild have radically altered it. but 
at the appeal of representative Bristol Meth- 
odists the committee has listened to the sug- 
gestion to preserve its old form. Money was 
promised to the renovation fund if this cpndi- 
tion were carried out. An appeal is now being 
made to Methodists to contribute £150 to this 
object, and to mark several sites sacred to Meth- 
odists in Bristol itself. 



Page Eight 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 11, 19 



t ^i t ft tf t A . 



Department of Woman's Work 

Conducted oy Mrs. W. R. Harris, Asheville, N. O. 



A PRAYER 

Lord Jesus, Thou who lovest 

Each little child like me, 
Oh, take my life and use it, 

And let me shine for Thee: 
Oh give me bits of work to do 
To show how much I love Thee too. 

I know in distant countries, 

Beyond the deep blue sea, 
Are many little children, 

Thou lovest just like me. 
But they have never heard Thy name, 
And do not know that Jesus came 

Lord, let me send Thy message 

Across the deep blue sea, 
To tell those little children 

What Thou hast done for me. 
Oh show me, Lord, what I can do 
That they may know and love Thee too. 



THIRD ANNUAL MEETING, WOM 
AN'S MISSIONARY CONFERENCE 

Our report of this, one of the great 
est Annual Meetings we have ever 
held, which was given in last week's 
issue, gave only the proceedings of the 
first two days, closing with the ser- 
vices of Sunday afternoon. 

On Sunday evening in the presence 
of a congregation filling every avail- 
able space in Tryon Street Church, 
Bishop Atkins delivered a most mag- 
nificent address showing how Chris- 
tianity was transforming the East and 
how its living and vitalizing effects 
were being felt. 

He gave many striking examples of 
the progress of the work in the Orient. 
Having been so recently a visitor to 
these countries his address was of 
especial interest. Korea, China and 
Japan were especially pointed out as 
nations of great promise. The work 
of the Methodist Church, he thinks, is 
of two kinds, to educate and to chris- 
tianize, but the educational work is 
different from America in that it is the 
object of every teacher in every school 
ultimately to bring the pupil to a be- 
lief in Christ. 

Bishop Atkins believes that the an- 
nexing of Korea to Japan will be for 
the political welfare of the Korean 
and that through intermarriage a fine 
type of manhood and womanhood will 
be developed. As to China there is 
no finer specimen of manhood than 
the Chinaman when brought up under 
favorable circumstances, he declared. 

This discourse gave a more vital 
and interesting picture to the congre- 
gation present than they had had op- 
portunity to secura before and the 
facts of conditions prevailing in these 
countries as brought out by Bishop 
Atkins will be remembered for many 
years by those as fortunate as to have 
heard him. 

Monday morning after a devotional 
service conducted by Miss Leila Tut- 
tle, of Shanghai, China, the report of 
Mrs. Mattie H. Stewart, First "Vice- 
President of the Conference, was 
heard. This report was a hopeful one 
and showed that in the work of the 
children there had been some advance 
made. A most gratifying feature of 
this report was the number of Mission 
Study classes that have been organ- 
ized during the year. We predict a 
splendid year for the children for 1915. 
A most interesting fact brought out 
was the adoption of the Standard of 
Excellence for the children which will 
in the future take the place of the 
banners which have been given at 
each annual meeting for efficient and 
excellent work. Let every Junior 
auxiliary adopt at once this standard 
and try to obtain the number of points 
to which every working society is en- 
titled. Two-minute reports from the 
leaders of the children's societies were 
heard and were for the most part en- 
couraging. 



"Our "Work in China" was the sub- 
ject of a most excellent talk by Miss 
Tuttle. She contrasted the work of the 
McTyeire School in 1891, the date of 
opening, with the work of last year 
and the wonderful growth of these 
years is. most encouraging to those in- 
terested in this branch of our work. 

The noon Bible study by Mrs. Hume 
R. Steele was illuminating and inspira 
tional. 

The Monday afternoon devotional 
service was conducted by Mrs. H. A 
Dunham, of Asheville, and was spe 
cially suited to the work of the young 
people. In absence of Mrs. Plato Dur- 
ham, whose absence was greatly re- 
gretted, the report of the Second Vice- 
President was read by Mrs. R. T. Wills 
of Greensboro 

There was no more interesting feat- 
ure of the whole Conference than the 
discussion on "Who Has the Larger 
Opportunity, the Young Woman Who 
Goes or the Young Woman Who 
Stays." The missionary to the for- 
egn field was represented by Miss 
Aleez Aycock, who in a most convinc 
ing manner showed the advantages of 
the woman who gives her life to the 
unsaved in the far-off lands, while 
equally convincing were the arguments 
brought out by Miss Helen Weaver in 
favor of the worker in the homeland. 
Both of these young ladies were repre- 
sentatives of the Senior class of the 
Greensboro College for Women. At 
this juncture Miss Mary Buttrick of 
Asheville came forward and signified 
her intention of going as a missionary 
as a kindergarten teacher. Our Con- 
ference feels honored in having one of 
her talented daughters offer herself 
to the work. Miss Buttrick will enter 
the training school this fall to prepare 
herself for the work. She is a sister 
of Miss Terrie Buttrick, who has been 
in Mexico for a number of years as 
one of our missionaries. < 
An Institute led by Mrs. Hume R. 
Steele on "The New Form of Organi- 
zation" was held and many of the 
problems with which we have been 
wrestling in the past few months as 
we have tried to conform to the new 
order of things were made plain to us 
by Mrs. Steele who is so familiar with 
the work of the Council of which she 
is one of the most wide-awake mem- 
bers. 

At the evening service "Our Fields" 
were represented, the foreign by Miss 
Tuttle of China, who gave most inter- 
estingly the development of our work 
there, while Mrs. Steele showed our 
growth in the home work. Both Mrs. 
Steele and Miss Tuttle were an in- 
spiration and the Conference was very 
fortunate in having them present. 

Tuesday morning's devotional ser- 
vice was conducted by Mrs. W. R. 
Harris of Asheville, after which the 
reports of the city mission boards of 
Asheville and Winston-Salem were 
read. In absence of Miss Guffin of 
Asheville, Mrs. Dunham read a most 
gratifying report of the work being 
accomplished there. Miss Frank Mil- 
ler, Deaconess of Winston-Salem, gave 
a splendid report of the work she and 
her co-laborers are doing in this part 
of Christ's vineyard. There is no 
work in which our Conference has a 
part that is more important than that 
of our city mission boards and we are 
especially glad to hear of the growth 
of the work at these two points. 

In a most splendid address on "The 
Need and Method of Co-operation Be- 
tween Church and State in Social 
Service," Mr. W. R. Lynch, Welfare 
Worker, of Spray, held the closest at- 
tention of his audience. Prison reform, 
Juvenile courts, playgrounds, labor and 
illiteracy were the subjects discussed 
in a most earnest manner by the 
speaker. (We hope to give our read- 



ers this address in full shortly. Ed 
itor.) 

The noon tide devotional was again 
conducted by Mrs. Steele and was an 
intercession for World Peace. 

Tuesday afternoon was given over 
to reading of committee reports, elec- 
tion of officers, and a strong address 
by Rev. Frank Siler, Conference Mis- 
sionary Secretary, who spoke on "The 
Correlation of the Missionary Forces of 
the Church." Dr. Siler spoke with 
fervor and enhtusiasm as he brought 
out the points in the arguments of 
the facts in reference to the consoli- 
dation of the missionary forces as one 
— as a unit — instead of separate bodies 

Greensboro was chosen as the next 
place of meeting, most cordial invi 
tations having been extended the Con- 
ference from representatives of the 
various churches there and the district 
as well. 

The following officers were chosen 
for the coming year: 

President, Mrs. Lucy H. Robertson : 
Greensboro, N. C; First Vice-Presi- 
dent, Mrs. H. K. Boyer, Winston-Salem 
N. C. ; Second "Vice-President, Mrs. Mat 
tie H. Stewart, Charlotte, N. C; Re 
cording Secretary, Mrs. E. L. Bain 
Winston-Salem, N. C; Corresponding 
Secretary, Mrs H. A. Dunham* Ashe 
ville, N. C; Treasurer, Mrs. P. N 
Peacock, Salisbury, N. C; Supt. of 
Mission Study and Publicity, Mrs 
W. R. Harris, Asheville, N. C; Supt 
of Social Service, Mrs. T. F. Marr, 
Charlotte, N C; Supt. of Supplies 
Mrs. J. N. Hauss, Thomasville, N. C; 
Distributor of Literature, Mrs. W. C. 
Houston, Concord, N. C. 



AN APPRECIATION 

We feel that in accepting the resig- 
nation of Mrs. L. W. Crawford, who 
has so faithfully and efficiently serv- 
ed as Conference Corresponding Secre- 
tary for fifteen years, we are losing 
from our Executive Committee in our 
body, as well as in the Woman's Coun- 
cil, a woman of the deepest spiritual- 
ity and faith. It has been she, "with 
the still small voice," who has sat 
quietly among us and tenderly but 
strongly guided us by her words of 
wisdom and love. 

Time after time, year after year, 
she has been the moving inspiration 
leading our women into fields of faith 
she has trodden and we had never 
dreamed of. Hers is the prayer life 
and at all times during the discussion 
of matters of greatset importance or 
perplexing situations, it has been her 
voice that has settled the problems 
and we have never dared to question 
her council or been slow to accept the 
standards she set for our Conference, 
because we knew that the message 
was from God and she brought it from 
her knees. It has been God's message 
to us to launch out into the deep wa- 
ters of faith and plan great things 
and give large gifts for the Master. 
Rarely have such large visions of God's 
plans for the salvation of the world, 
such consecration of heart, such firm- 
ness of soul been exemplified in our 
midst. 

Never for a moment has she been 
unmindful of the work of the young 
people and children, realizing the all- 
ijmportance of their enlistment and 
training in the missionary work. We 
owe her a debt of love and thanks we 
can never repay. 

Many of us remember her when the 
mantle of dear "Aunt Bumpass" fell 
upon Mrs. Crawford.' At the meeting 
in Winston, she came into the work 
as an answer to prayer. Our Confer- 
ence pedge was then about $300, but 
from the very first board meeting she 
attended she began her work by setting 
our goal high up and has kept it go- 
ing up until it has reached the high 
water mark of $15,000. We deem it a 
rare and precious opportunity to have 
worked side by side with Mrs. Craw- 
ford — a woman of great faith. 

An incident of her faith in God 
and in our women was Illustrated in the 
last session of the Annual Meeting. 



When all the District Secretaries 1 
pledged in advance of last year to 
extent of their faith, Mrs. Crawf. 
afcer communing with her Mas 
made an appeal for special love ofi 
ings from the members of the C 
ference. As a result individ 
pledges amounting to $525 were ma 
she herself heading the list with 
most liberal contribution. 

Her blessings, her prayers, her 
ample of consecration and faith i 
remain with us and may we not 
strive to, at least in some measure, 
tain to that degree of ispirituality ! 
possesses. — Mattie H. Stewart. 



THANKS FOR COURTESIES 

The Society adopted unanimou 
the following report of the commit 
on courtesies: 

"When it was made known that j 
third annual meeting of the Woma 
Missionary Society of the West( 
North Carolina Conference was to 
in Charlotte there was a glad sc 
in the heart of each member. 1 
Queen City has verified the fact tl 
it is indeed a center of loving ki; 
ness and Christian hospitality as w 
as missionary activity. 

"For the gracious reception a 
lavish entertainment we are dee] 
grateful, and would express our ; 
preciation to each one who has c< 
tributed in any way to our pleasi 
and comfort. 

"To Brother McLarty, the pastor a 
Mrs. McLarty for their interest a 
helpfulness, the local committee 1 
the elegant luncheon served each d 
in the dining room of the Church, t 
children for their beautiful enterta 
ment Sunday afternoon, the chloir 1 
their inspiring music, the railroad s 
thorities for their kind considerati 
and the local papers Which have mc 
generously opened their columns i 
the reports of our proceedings. 

"It is with profound appreciation 1 
desire to thank Bishop Atkins for 1 
splendid sermon and address — both 
full of convincing thought. 

"We are deeply indebted to M: 
Hume R. Steele for her cheerful a 
untiring helpfulness and to Miss Le 
Tuttle for her presence and very ; 
teresting addresses. 

"We were glad for the privilege 
hearing Mr. W. R. Lynch in his m; 
terly address on social service, 
the interesting and instructive messa 
brought to us by Doctor Siler and 
encouraging remarks by Rev. J. 
Baldwin. 

"Mrs. R. P. Anderson, 
"Mrs. H. K. Boyer, 
"Mrs. W. R. Harris. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON 
TENSION OF WORK 

Believing that: 

"More things are wrought by pray 
than this world dreams of," and 
membering that the supreme comma 
of our Master himself was: "Pray 
therefore, the Lord of the harvest th 
he will send forth laborers into 
hravest," we would ask that our me 
bers covenant together for daily 
tercession for these definite thing 

(1) That our women everywhere sh 
catch the larger vision of our unit 
missionary work and be loyal to all 
demands of time, talent and inone 

(2) That the joy of a life hid wi 
Christ in God may be so manifest 
our daily lives and service that 
children in our homes may be dra\ 
into a surrendering of life for hir 

(3) That such* courage and faith m 
be born within us that we shall und( 
take hard things this year "as go 
soldiers of Jesus Christ." 

Coming in this spirit of prayer 
consider how to extend our work, yo 
committee would make the followi; 
recom mendations : 

1. That as the District Secretary 
becoming more and more the unit 
power in our organization, we gl 
ourselves much to prayer for the 



(Continued on Page 14) 



February 11, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Nine 



Epworth League Department 

Conducted ly Miss A.. Stanly Hall, Hickory, N. O. 



DISTRICT SECRETARIES 

Asheville 

H. E. Walter Asheville 

Charlotte 

Miss Leola Hannon, Box 1056, Charlotte 
Winston 

F. T. Scarborough Winston-Salem 

Greensboro 

Miss Lillian Massey High Point 

Morganton 

Rev. J. F. Armstrong Henrietta 

North Wilkesboro 

Rev. J. M. Downum Boone 

Salisbury 

Miss Estelle Crowell Salisbury 

Statesville 

Herbert H. Lowry Newton 

Mount Airy 

Rev. A. L. Aycock Leaksrille 

Shelby 

Miss Delia Nolen Gastonia 

Waynesville 

Miss Margaret Rogers Franklin 

Superintendent Junior Leagues 
Mrs. C. M. Pickens Cornelius 



WHAT HAVE WE DONE TODAY? 

We shall do so much in the years to 
come, 

But what have we done today? 
We shall give our gold in a princely 
sum, 

But what did we give today? 
We shall lift the heart and dry the 
tear, 

We shall plant a hope in the place of 
fear, 

We shall speak the words of love and 
cheer, 

But what did we speak today? 
We shall be so kind in the afterwhile, 

But what have we been today? 
We shall bring to each lonely life a 
smile, 

But what did we bring today? 
We shall give to truth a grander birth, 
And to steadfast faith a deeper worth 
We shall feed the hungering souls of 
earth, 

But whom have we fed today? 
We shall reap such joys in the by and 
by, 

But what have we sown today? 
We shall build us mansions in the sky, 

But what have we built today? 
'Tis sweet in idle dreams to bask, 
But here and now do we do our task? 
Yes, this is the thing our souls must 
ask: 

"What have we done today?" 

— Nixon Waterman. 



Rev. J. S. Hiatt, pastor Grace Church, 
Winston, writes us that he expects to 
organize a Senior League at that 
church in the near future. We wish 
them much success with their League 
and hope to have some good reports 
from them soon. 

He also sends following clipping 
from Twin-City Sentinel in regard to 
meeting of the Junior League of Lib- 
erty Church. This is a meeting that 
would be appropriate for all our Ju- 
nior Leagues. 

RECITE BIBLE VERSES AND WIN 
PRIZES 

The Junior Epworth League of Lib- 
erty M. E. Church held a very inter- 
esting service last night at the church. 
A prize had been offered to the boy or 
girl that could recite the most verses 
of Scripture. Miss Nell Clingman won 
first prize, reciting one hundred and 
twenty-nine verses. Misses Edith 
Stanley and Myrtle Campbell won sec- 
ond prize, each reciting forty-seven 
verses. 

Officers for the ensuing year were 
elected as follows: President, Nell 
Clingman; vice-president, Lucy Mar- 
shall; secretary, Osborne Lancaster; 
treasurer, Eugene Oakley. 



The class numbers thirty-five and is 
doing a fine work for the boys and 
girls of North Winston. 



Grace Church, Winston-Salem, has 
two Junior Leagues. That is fine. Are 
the other churches going to be so be- 
hind this church that they will not 
even have one League — either Senior 
or Junior? A church with two Junior 
and one Senior League is bound to 
do something, so keep your eyes on 
Grace Church, Winston-Salem. 



Newton Epworth League elects the 
following officers for the New Year: 

President, Mr. H. H. Lowry; first 
vice-president, Miss Mabel Bacon; sec- 
ond vice-president, Miss Maude Bal- 
lard; third vice-president, Miss Olive 
Duke; fourth vice-president, Miss Dor- 
othy Ervin; secretary, Miss Ola Smith; 
assistant secretary, Miss Daisy Sta- 
nley; treasurer, Mr. T. E. Wright; re- 
porter, Miss Lula Watts. This organ- 
ization, which is one of the largest in 
the town, is composed of nearly 80 
members. 



The following bit of poetry was given 
us at Junaluska last summer. We 
think it would be helpful to all our 
Leaguers if they would memorize it or 
place a copy where they could read it 
each day: 

You are writing a gospel; 

A chapter each day, 
By words that you speak, 

By deeds that you do. 
Men read what you write, 
Whether faithful or true. 
Say, what is this gospel 
According to YOU? 



FOR SUFFERING BELGIUM 

No appeal that has come to us for 
international charity has had more 
urgent cause than that of wronged, 
desolated, bleeding, suffering Belgium. 
Invaded by a foreign army, ruined as 
a consequence of maintaining the invio- 
lability of her own borders, mulcted 
of millions for indemnity by her de- 
spoilers, her resources destroyed, the 
need of seven million Belgians makes 
a loud call for aid. 

Apart from the cause, Belgium's 
necessities would be an imperative de- 
mand upon us who are happily situated 
in the midst of peace and comfort. 
While her sons are fighting for prin- 
ciple and liberty the women and chil- 
dren are weeping in helpless misery, 
facing famine and pestilence. 

The interest of Epworth Leaguers in 
Belgium is associated with their great 
mission work in the Belgian Congo. 
Many courtesies have been shown our 
Bishop Lambuth and his heroic band 
of missionaries by the Belgian Gov- 
ernment. Now let us add to our work 
for the black subjects of Begium in the 
Congo gifts for King Albert's white 
subjects in the homeland. 

Will not every League Chapter do 
something for Belgium? Make an of- 
fering; give a beautiful entertainment 
and devote the proceeds; solicit money 
of friends; in some way answer the 
call of Belgium, which is the call of 
Christ. 

Send the money to J. D. Hamilton. 
Treasurer, 810 Broadway, Nashville, 
Tenn., or to the "Epworth Era," stat- 
ing that it is for the Epworth League 
Belgian Relief Fund, and it will be ap- 
plied at once to the sacred cause for 
which it is given. — Epworth Era. 



6 lb. pair Pillows to match for Sl.00 

AH new, sanitaryfeathere, Famous Amoskeag ticking. 
0 4 yards to tick, positively biggest and beet bed on market 
Belling for less than $12. Safe delivery and satisfaction 
guaranteed or money back. Order today or write for catalog 
and big special offer. First order counts on premium. 

SANITARY 8ED0IN6 COMPANY, Dept. 613 Charlotte, H, t 



Standard Form 
Collection Envelopes 



Western North Carolina Conference 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South 

HOLT'S CHAPEL 



FOR PASTOR'S SALARY 



AMOUNT 



IftCame 



Date. 



191.... 



Dollar* Cents 



MISSIONS AND CONFERENCE COLLECTIONS 

Western North Carolina Conference 

Methodist Episcopal Church, South 

MOUNT ZION CHURCH 



Name- 
Date .. 



Dolla 



Cents 



$1.90 for lOOO, delivered 

$1.40 for additional 1000, delivered 
FOR EITHER FORM 



This price is based on using the above forms, changing name of church 
only. The large envelope is manila, and of the quality regularly used for 
Pastor's Salary collections. The small envelope can be furnished in white, 
green or cherry. Its difference in color and size from the Pastor's Salary 
form makes it ideal for Missions and Conference Collections. 

If special form is desired the price will average $2.40 for the first 1000, 
and $1.40 for additional 1000's, delivered. 

Special rates on large quantities. 

The Advocate Press, Greensboro, N. C. 



Carolina & Northwestern Rwy, Co* 

Schedule Effective October 18th, 1914 



Northbound 


NO. 10 
Passenger 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 8 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 6 
Passenger 
Sun. Only 


NO. 50 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 52 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


Chester Lv. 


7 50 a m 

8 36 

9 21! 
9 30 

10 23 

11 05 

12 05 p m 
1 08 

I OOx 
4 09 
4 35 








4 16 p m 

6 38 
8 20 


Yorfevllle " 


















4 30 p m 

5 40 

6 44 

7 80 

8 50 
























12 06 p m 
1 08 


6 45 a m 
8 07 
































' Southbound 


NO. 9 
Passenger 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 7 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 5 
Passenger 
Sun. Only 


NO. 61 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


NO. 53 
Mixed 
Ex. Sun. 


Edgemont Lv. 


9 00 a m 
9 10 
11 20! 

1 85 p m 

2 35 

3 05 

3 43 

4 30 

6 05x 

5 54 

6 40 




















Lenoir " 










Lenoir ' ' 


7 00am 

8 15 

9 00 
9 51 

11 28 


8 15 am 

9 12 


1 10 p m 
3 20 




Hickory " 

Newton ' ' 




Lineolnton " 






















11 60 a m 
1 24 

3 10 p m 


Yorkville. " 

























x Leave 



CONNECTIONS 



! Arrive 



CHESTER — Southern Railway, S. \ L. and L. & C. 
YORKVILLE— Southern Railway LINCOLNTON— S. A. L. 

GASTONIA— Southern Railway, Piedmont & Northern Railway 
NEWTON and HICKORY— Southern Railway 



E. F. REID. G. P. Agt. 



CHESTER, S. C. 



Page Ten 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 11, 1915 



Our Children's Home 

Conducted by Walter Thompson, 8upt. 



FIFTH SUNDAY COLLECTIONS 

Center S. S., Catawba, E. B. Stiles, 
51c; Bethlehem S. S., Claremont, B. 
M. Morrow, $1.60; Spray S. S., Spray, 
S. W. Hodges, $3.40; "West End Meth- 
odist S. S., Winston, Eugene Simpson, 
$21.31; West Market S. S., Greensboro, 
W. H. Rees, $16.73; Loves S. S., Walk- 
ertown, D. C. Moir, $8.50; Wentworth 
S. S., Wentworth, J. T. Smith, $5.22; 
Joshen M. E. S. S., Stokesdale, J. M. 
McMichael, $2.00; Mount Pleasant S. 
S., Clemmons, S. T. Naylor, 50c; Mt. 
Holly S. S., Mt. Holly, G. B. Howard, 
$6.27; Rockford S. S., Rockford, J. M. 
Dunn, $1.75; Siloam S. S., Siloam, R. 
N. Marion, $7.44; Gold Hill S. S., Gold 
Hill, C. C. McHargue, $4.28; Ruther- 
fordton, S. S., Ruthefodrton, W. J. 
Mode, $3.75; Rutherfordton, W. J. 
Mode, $3.86; Mocks S. S., Advance, W. 
. S. Phelps, 72c; Doub's Church S. S., 
Pfafftown, E. W. Hauser, $4.22; Friend- 
ship S. S., Newton, N. E. Propst, $1.00; 
Weightman S. S., Polkton, S. B. Lee, 
$2.10; Peachland S. S., Peachland, M. 
W. Lee, $1.00; Weddington S. S., Mat- 
thews, L. C. Kimbrell, $3.09; Main St. 
M. E. S. S., Gastonia, R. B. Babington, 
$15.61; Pisgah S. S., Lincolnton, R. C. 
Lynch, $1.60; Pleasant Hill S. S., Mar- 
ion, I. M. Parker, 50c; Central M. E. S. 
S., Shelby, J. F. Roberts, $12.02; Green- 
lee S. S. .Marion, Mrs. R. L. Padgett, 
$1.00; Centenary S. S., Clemmons, J. 

E. Brewer, 65c; Concord M. E. S. S., 
Mocksville, P. R. Davis, $1.20; Gilkey 
S. S., Gilkey, C. F. Cline, $4.00; Olin 
S. S., Olin, Jas. A. Weisner, $1.00; Ac- 
ton S. S., Sulphur Springs Circuit, Ac- 
ton, Rev. J. M. Hawkins, $2.07; Wesley 
Chapel S. S., Monroe, L. L. Moore, 
$1.00; Union S. S., Monroe, Joseph 
Redwine, $1.15: Monroe, J. E. Starnes, 
$1.17; North Monroe S. S., Monroe, B. 

F. Sanford, $3.55; Central M. E. S. S., 
Monroe, C. B. Laney, $9.91; Rocky 
Springs S. S., Hiddenite, A. C. Sharpe, 
50c; Bethel S. S., Canton, Dr. J. E. 
Wilson, 50c; Mt. Pleasant S. S., Ashe- 
ville, H. L. King, $6.77; South Lenoir 
Church S. S., Lenoir, R. F. Wellons, 
$1.83; Central Methodist S. S., Ashe- 
ville, W. Allen Kindal, $43.81; Grace S. 
S., Winston, A. B. Hauser, $13.60; Cen- 
ter S. S., Greensboro, A. J. Busick, 
$1.00; Zion S. S., Greensboro, J. W. 
Zink, $2.20; Linwood M. E. Church S. 
S., Linwood, J. R. Raper, $5.18; China 
Grove S. S., China Grove, J. W. Day- 
vault, $3.85; Wilkesboro S. S., Wilkes- 
boro, C. F. Morrison, $2.08; North 
Cbarlotte, C. D. Moore, $4.90; Cotton- 
ville S. S., Norwood, B. F. Kendall, 
$1.55; Morven M. E. S. S., Morven, 
Cliff Ratcliff, $8.79; Rural Hall M. E. 
S. S., Rural Hall. A. L. Payne^ $2.63; 
Shady Grave S. S., Winston-Salem, R. 
H. Stone, $1.20; Pine Hall S. S., Pine 
Hall, J. C. Flinn, $2.58; Bethany S. S., 
New London, R. A. Hunnycutt, $1.87; 
Bethlehem S. S., Reidsville, Miss Lot- 
tie Burton, $3.00; Trinity S. S., Trin- 
ity, W. C. Massey, $9.25; High Shoals 
S. S., High Shoals, D. A. Medlin, 
$4.06; Asbury S. S., Lincolnton, C. B. 
Goodson, $1.00; Hudson M. E. S. S., 
Hudson, J. F. Query, $1.27. Whitsett 
M. E. S. S., Whitsett, O. P. Fitzgerald, 
$1.30; WhiUjl S. S., Lenoir, R. W. 
Shell, $1.04; Etoneville S. S., Stone- 
ville, S. T. Hodgin, $2.15; Trinity S. S., 
Charlotte, J. J. Stillwell, $3.39; McAd- 
enville Station, McAdenville, Rev. D. 
W. Brown, $4.06; Central S. S., Albe- 
marle, H. L. Horton, $6.35; Wesley 
Memorial S. S., High Point, V. A. J. 
Idol, $21.26; West End S. S., Gastonia, 
T. L. Jenkins, $2.95; Mt. Olivet S. S., 
Concord, J. A. Scott, $6.61; Waxhaw M. 
E. S. S., Waxhaw, H. G. Clark, $1.50 
Greensboro, A. L. Hicks, $4.75; Pleas- 
ant Hill S. S., McFarlan, H. E. Max- 
well, $2.17; Stanley S. S., Stanley, J. 
W. Dellinger, $1.72; Unity S. S., Thom- 
asville, G. V. Bodenheimer, $1.70; Ruf- 
fin, M. D. Holderly; 85c; Antioch S. S., 
Rural Hall, W. E. Kreeger, $2.50; Mt. 
Pleasant S. S., Donnaha, R. E. Ward, 
$3.10; Draper M. E. S. S., Draper, T. 



This World-Renowned Work 

Published in Smaller 
- and More Volumes 



Was '49 



Bound Complete in Seven 
Big Volumes Including 
Index Volume 



Now '10 



The grandest library of Bible Knowledge and Teaching in existence at the most sweeping reduction ever made on a work of similar value. 
Originally published and sold in a bulky and unwieldly set of 25 small volumes at $49.00, we now offer the identical complete work 
compactly bound in seven volumes at a small fraction of the original cost FOR A LIMITED TIME. 

S ^an Y «°e u . $ l,^acr BUT YOU MUST ACT QUICKLY 

AN EXPOSITION OF THE BIBLI 



"By far the best commentary on Genesis ' 
New York. 



-The Churchman* 




"Full of spiritual truth and instruction."— Christian Work. 
"Young ministers will find it a mine of treasure."— New York 
Evangelist. 

"Unusually fresh and bright."— Presbyterian and Reformed 
Revitw. 

"Delightful and instructive reading."— Continent. 
"Rich imagery and elegant diction."— N.Y. Christian Advocate. 
"The preacher who cannot derive very material assistance 
from these volumes must be a difficult person to help."— The 

Living Church. 

"It easily takes its place in the front rank of works which 
have for their object the understanding of the Bible and the 
application of its teachings to practical life."— The Outlook. 

"The plan is most admirable, being in the nature of exposi- 
tory lectures rather than conservative and verbal comments, 
and its carrying out by foremost preachers and theologians 
secures scientific and scholarly thoroughness along with pop- 
ular and practical interest."— The Christian Intelligencer. 

"The series is proving that the exposition of the Scriptures 
need be neither dry nor wearisome, and preachers will do well 
to study these volumes, as examples of expository style and 
method."— The Watchman. 

FOR THE PREACHER 

it affords endless material to enrich his sermons, 
. both in history, criticisms, and exposition. 

FOR THE TEACHER 

it provides overwhelming resources of attaining or 
communicating Scriptural knowledge or answering 

questions. 

FOR THE LAYMAN 

it spreads a matchless '"east of instruction and 
comfort. 

This great work consists of seven large volumes solidly packed with thousands of the most practical and valuable helps for the preacher, 
teacher and Bible student. Unlike the ordinary commentary with its details and technicality this vast library of Bible helps actually ex- 
pounds the Word of God. The contents are made up of scholarly, suggestive and intensely interesting expository lectures on all the books' 
of the Bible, contributed by the foremost preachers and theologians of the day — men whose very names are the highest assurance of the 
far-reaching value of their contributions. The work has won universal praise from the entire religious press and pulpit. 

876 pages each, 10 3-8 x 7 1-4 inches, 
strong handsome buckram binding, (including Indis- 
pensable New Index Volumes) Containing nearly 1,400 chapters, 5,261 pages, exhaustively illumlnat- 
ing^everyA topic and every phase of each chapter and book of the Old and New Testaments. 



SEVEN MASSIVE VOLUMES =t, 



Twenty-seven of the World's Most Eminent Biblical Scholars 



Distinguished Authors and their Contributions:- 



Genesis, St. John, First Corinthians. Marcus 
Dods, D.D., Exodus, St. Mark, G. A. Cbadwick, 
D. D. Leviticus, S. H. Kellogg, D. D. Numbers, Judges, Ruth, Job, R. A. Watson, D. D. Deuteronomy, Andrew Harper, D. D. Joshua, 
First and Second Samuel, W. G. Blaikie, D. D., LL.D. First and Second Kings, Daniel, Dean F.W. Farrar, D.D. First and Second Chroni- 
cles, W. H. Bennett, M, A, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, Song of Solomon, Lamentations, W. F. Adbnit, M. A. Psalms, Colossians, Philemon, 
Alexander Maclaren, D. D. Proverbs, R. F. Horton, D. D. Ecclesiastes, Samuel Cox, D. D. Isaiah, Twelve Minor Prophets, George 
Adam Smith, D. D., LL. D. Jeremiah, C. J. Ball, M. A. Ezeklel, John Skinner, M. A. St. Matthew, J. Mdnro Gibson, D. D. St. Luke, 
Henrt Burton, M. A. Acts of the Apostles, G. T. Stokes, D. D. Romans, H. C. G. Moule. D. D. Second Corinthians, Thessalonians, 
James Denney, D. D. Galatians, Ephesians, E. G. Findlay, D. D. Philippians, Robert Rainey, D. D. First and Second Timothy, Titus, 
James, Jude. A. Plummer, D.D.Hebrews, C. T. Edwards, D. D. First and Second Peter. J. R. Lumby. D. D. First, Second and Third 
John, W. Alexander D. D. Revelation, W. Milligan, D. D. 

"All of the volumes are replete with instruction, and embody the best 
and latest results of Biblical criticism and study. As a whole, indeed, 
they are [the best practical exposition of the Scripture$ in the English 
language.'' — Reformed Church Review. 
Thousands of preachers, teachers, and Bible students will realize the Importance and far-reaching value of this library. 



Features of Indispensable Value to 
Every Preacher, Teacher, Student 



The Bible's Richest Treasures 

The richest, most suggestive, and most in- 
) spiring portions of the Bible are selected, illus- 
ttrated, and analyzed in the most helpful and 
interesting way. m**w«ifc«tt*v-' - 



A Library of Right-Hand Helps 

Preachers, students and teachers can not 
afford to be without this massive library of 
helps to the more thorough, scholarly and 
satisfying interpretation of the Seriptures. 



New Beauties of Scripture 

New beauties of Scripture are disclosed to 
the preacher and student, and a treasure 
seed thought is provided which is almost 
inexhaustible. 



"The series is planned so as to give the reader all the good of a scientific commentary without the padding, technicality, and detail. ... In every 
book of the Bible the rich, fertile, and perpetually significant portions are selected, and continuously analyzed. Illustrated and explained by interpreters who 

are scholarly yet {ntereRlinQ."—British Weekly. 

UAIU Trt ORFSFW On the Monthly Payment Plan we require $2 \vUh order, and your promise to pay Jl monthly for ten months. Books forwarded 
O-wWW IV wf»li>CH» on receipt of cash price or first installment of $2. Customers pay freight or express chargeB. Those at remote points or in 
forelg n countries desiring us to prepay will send 30 cents per volume to cover cost of postage or express. Safe delivery guaranteed to any station in the country or 
to any mail point In the world. We will take back books that are not satisfactory if returned within ten days and refund money, deducting only the return 
transportation charges. 

As to our reliability, we refer you to the publishers of this 
paper, or to any commercial agency. Established 1S66. 

k. S. S. SCRANTON CO., 118 Trumbull Street. Hartford, Conn. 



tmsm 



A. Caston, $3.00; Danbury Union S. S., 
Danbury, V. O. Petree, $1.60; Marshall 
M. B. S. S., Marshall, J. R. Sevann, 
$6.00; Rutherford College S. S., Ruth- 
erford College, Miss Bessie Havner, 
S3.75; Pruitland S. S., Hendersonville, 
Miss Cleo Johnson, $2.75; Lee's Chap- 
el S. S., Brown Summit, Miss Juanita 
Lucas, $1.00; Sharon S. S., Winston- 
Salem, M. S. Speas, $2.60; Peach Tree 
S. S., Murphy, Miss Judith Davis, $2.00; 
Concord S. S., Parmer, Geo. M. Dor- 
sett, $2.00; Union S. S., Lewisville, J. 
R. Hauser, $1.00; Blackburns S. S., 
Todd, E. B. Houck, 28c; Panther Creek 
S. S., Crabtree, T. L. McElrath, 65c; 
Crabtree, Riley M. Ferguson, $1.50; 
West's Chapel Sunday School, Bilt- 
more, J. R. Roberts, $3.00; Mt. Pisgah 
S. S., Guilford College, Houston Nel- 
son, 50c; Lowes S. S., Reidsville, R. L. 
Pearson, $1.50; Lowell S. S., Lowell, 

B. P. Leonhardt, $2.60; Liberty S. S., 
Mocksville, W. H. Hobson, $1.35; Lab- 
oratory S. S., Lincolnton, M. J. Lynch, 
$3.75; M<t. Olivet S. S. ( Lexington, W. 
M. Zimmerman, $5.00; Dallas S. S., 



Dallas, J. P. Puett, $6.25; Macedonia 
Church, Jackson Hill Charge, Eldo- 
rado, J. G. Harris, $1.97; Sanders S. S., 
Wentworth Circuit, Leaksville, S. P. 
Thomas, $2.65; Elk Park M. E. S. S., 
Elk Park, E. H. Mortimer, $1.74; For- 
est Hill M. E. S. S., Concord, J. W. 
Kime, $5.39; Cleveland S. S., Cleve- 
land, J. W. Brewer, $2.00; Webster 
S. S., Webster, J. L. Broyles, $1.00; 
First M. E. Church Sunday School, 
Mooresville, Mors McKeught, $8.64; 
Fair View S. S., Mooresville, W. C. 
Thompson, $1.00; Ramseur S. S., Ram- 
seur and Franklinville Charge, Ram- 
seur, Charles A. Reece, $10.50; Rural 
Hall, M. A. Walker, 55c; Liberty M. E. 
S. S., Liberty, E. A. Caudle, $4.58; 
Holt's Chapel S. S., Greensboro, Dred 
C, Ward, $2.82; Chestnut Grove S. S., 
Sandy Mush, W. S. Robinson, $2.00; 
Cross Rock S. S., Cross Rock, V. L. 
Church, $1.00; Salem S. S., Bostic, B. 
F. Weast, 78c; Troutman S. S., Trout- 
man, E. M. Wagner, $1.06; Oak Grove 
S. S., Mt. Airy, James C. Welch, 
$1.00; Glen Alpine S. S., Glen Alpine, 



A. M. Davis, $1.50; Cedar Hill S. S., 
Ansonville, A. E. Hendley, $3.62; 
Asheboro M. E. S. S., Asheboro, Jesse 
Scarboro, $11.26; Hendersonville M. E. 
S. S., Hendersonville, H. M. Whitfield, 
$5.38; Pine Bluff S S., Georgeville, L. 
Z. Shinn, 70c; Crews' S. S., Walker- 
town, Miss Emma Beeson, $1.80; Gil- 
boa S. S., Marshville, W. B. Marsh, 
$2.00; Elkin & S., Elkin, J. S, Bell, 
$10.25; Norwood S. S., Norwood, T. A. 
Hatlhcock, $13.17; Bethel S. S., Cabar- 
rus, Lemmil Flowe, $1.25; Boone S. S., 
Boone, J. F. Hardin, $3.20; Hayesville 
S. S., Hayesville, C. H. Heigler, $2.00; 
Pisgah S. S., Candler, J. W. Howell, 
$1.67; Belmont S. S., Belmont, R. S. 
Armstrong, $4.62; Murphy, Geo. B. 
Strickland, $4.00; Mt. Island S. S., 
Mt. Holly, Miss Lizzie McKelvey, 
$2.00; Pleasant Hill S. S., Candler, J. 
C. Curtis, $3.70; First Methodist S. S., 
Salisbury, Leroy A. Smith, $25.66; Pat- 
ton's S. S., Franklin, E. Patton, $1.05; 
Bethel M. E. S. S., Cullasaja, A. W. 
Jacobs, $1.25; Haywood St. S. S., 
Auheville, H. A. Dunham, 123.38; 



February 11, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Ekven 



Stony Hill S. S., Albemarle, T. B. Mul- 
linex, $3.05; Cedar Grove S. S., Nor- 
wood, E. L. Lauder, 12c; Randall S. 
S., T. P. Snuggs, $1.00; Hiddenite, 
Miss Pattie Beckham, $2.20; North 
Wilkesboro S. S., North Wilkesboro, 
Frank D. Hackett, $5.12; Rosman S. 
S., Rosman, Drayton Randolph, $3.00; 
Hatchers Chapel S. S., Brim, J. F. Bish- 
op, $1.15; Belmont S. S., Belmont, T. 
S. Ritch, $4.10; Mill Creek S. S., Rav- 
en, D. R. Scott, $3.10; Bethany S. S., 
Baldwin, A. H. Houck, $1.48; Yadkin- 
ville S. S., Yadkinville, R. C. Pur- 
year, $1; Bethany S. S., Sherrills Ford, 
T. R. Howard, 50c; Connelly Springs 
S. S., D. W. Alexander, $3.00; Waxhaw 
S. S., Waxhaw, J. C. Haywood, $1.27; 
Cooleemee, A. C. Walker, $4.82; Nel- 
lie, T. L. Palmer, 72c; Providence S. 
S., Henrietta, W. L. Smith, 60c; Little 
Sandy S. S., Canton, Elbert Barrett, 
$1.00; Poplar Spring S. S., Newsom, 
J W. Newsom, $3.00; Mt. Zion S. S., 
Lenoir, H. H. D. Hoover, $1.00; Wes- 
ley Chapel S. S., Mocksville, Miss 
Mary McMahan, $1.18; Newton S. S., 
J. E. Setzer, $10; Bulah S. S., Moravian 
Falls, W. C. Scroggs, $1.71; Race St. 
S. S., Statesville, C. M. Campbell, 
$2.50; Bethel S. S., Salisbury, F. B. 
Miller, 75c; Concord S. S., Monbo, Sam- 
uel Turner, $3.00; East Laport S. S., 
East Laport, R. C. Hunter, 60c; Mace- 
donia S. S., Harmony, Miss Cecil Par- 
is, 78e; Leicester, Verly E. Alex- 
ander, $1.00; Leaksville S. S., Leaks- 
ville, A. L. Aycock, $14.58; Unity Kan- 
napolis S. S., Glass, M. C. Searcy, 
$1.50; Main St. M. E. S. S., High Point, 
Chas. Osborne, $9.58; East End S. S., 
High Point, H.L.Lewis, $2.01; Flint Hill 
S. S., Alexander, W. H. Hunter, $2.00; 
Asbury S. S., Candler, Earle Thrash, 
$2.18; Oak Hill S. S., Sulphur Springs 
Circuit, Candler, A. S. Starnes, $2.00; 
Crouse S. S., Crouse, $2.00; Moriah 
Memorial S. S., Balsam, Mrs. D. T. 
Knight, 50c; Burkhead S. S., Winston, 
J. A. Magfe\ $16.16; Brevard St. S. S., 
Charlotte, "V\ T. Greene, $8.55. Total 
$695.03. 



RECEIVED ON SPECIAL, GENERAL 
AND TEN PER CENT. AS- 
SESSMENT FUND 

C. M. Grier, Macon, Ga., $15.00; 
Wadesboro Methodist, Wadesboro, Rev. 
Geo. D. Herman, $25.00; Cooleemee 
Church, Cooleemee, C. M. Short, $3.40; 
Biltmore Methodist Church, Biltmore, 
Miss Julia Brookshire, $2.34; Patty's 
Chapel, Brickton, Miss Janie L. Mc- 
Dowell, $4.18; C. M. Edwards, High 
Point, $15.00; Kannapolis Church, 
Kannapolis, P. W. Tucker, $10.00; Mc- 
Adenville, Rev. D. W. Brown, $1.15; 
Ramseur Church, Ramseur and Frank- 
linville Charge, Ramseur, Charles A. 
Reece, $16.00; Franklinville S. S., 
Ramseur, Charless A. Reece, $6.25; Mt. 
Pleasant, Denver, L. P. Eckard, $1.00; 
Hiddenite, Miss Pattie Beckham, $2.50; 
Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Foushee, Winston, 
$10.00 ; Broad St. M. E. Church, States- 
ville, T. B. Bunch, $30.64; Henrietta 
M. E. Church, Henrietta, Rev. J. N. 
Callahan, $6.26; Jackson Hill Church, 
Jackson Hill, C. C. Williams, $1.50, 
Oak Forest, Morganton, A. C. Swofford, 
$2-28; Salem Church, Morganton, A. 
C. Swofford, $1.80; Main St. Church. 
High Point, Chas Osborne, $3.18; E. 
Spencer, S. E. Richardson, $2.05. To- 
tal $159.53, 



BUILDING FUND 

Junior Philathea Class, Lexington, 
J. F. Spruill, teacher, $30.00; John H. 
Cathey, Asheville, $12.50; R. R. Boggs, 
Catawba, $10.00; H. G. Bassett, Ashe- 
ville, R. 1, $10.00; E. S. Roberts and 
wife, Biltmore, $5.00; Joe Ralston, 
Asheville, R. 1, $5.00; Charles Ralston, 
Asheville, Rte. 1, $2.50; G. C. Logan, 
Waynesville, $2.50; Mrs. C. P. Heav- 
ener, Lincolnton, $1.00. Total $78.50. 




OUR WASHINGTON LETTER 

Just one more month for the pres- 
ent session to finish its work of the 
63rd Congress. So much is yet to be 



.NEW DORKITORY - FITZGERALD MALL ENTRANCE TO CAMPV5 

The A-Grade College of the Two Methodist 
Conferences of North Carolina 

Chartered 1838. Confers the degree of A. B. in the literary department, and B. M. in 
the music department. 

In addition to our regular classical course, and preparatory department open to students 
having completed the eighth grade, special attention is called to the departments of Home 
Economics, Expression, Business, Art, Education, Sunday School Teacher Training, Piano 
Pedagogy, and to our complete School of Music which has steadily grown into one of the 
highest excellence in our country. 

Pall term opens September 8th, 1915. For further information apply to 

REV. S. B. TURRENTINE, A. M., D..D., PRESIDENT, GREENSBORO, N. C. 



done that an extra session of the 64th 
Congress is feared. 

The passage of the immigration hill 
over the President's veto in the lower 
house this week failed by five votes 
of a two-third vote. Administration 
senators are apprehensive that the 
ship purchase bill will suffer defeat at 
the hands of a half dozen or more op- 
posing democrats. Senator Simmons, 
who is one of Mr. Wilson's strongest 
supporters, favors an extra session if 
necesary. Many leaders are urging 
the strictest economy in appropriation 
bills which have not yet become a law. 

Since his recent visit to Washington 
where 5,000 to 8,000 heard a most pow- 
erful sermon our good people are or- 
ganizing and taking steps to have the 
celebrated baseball evangelist, "Billy" 
Sunday, hold a campaign of religious 
services at the National Capital. 

Some 600 leading business men rep- 
resenting all but one state in the union 
composing the United States Chamber 
of Commerce, are holding their annual 
session in this city. Many prominent 
speakers, including President Wilson 
and Secretary Bryan, added greatly to 
the interest of the meetings. 

The North Carolina Society of this 
city enjoyed a most delightful at home 
— a typical Southern social evening — 
at the Confederate Veteran's hall on 
Friday night of last week. Several 
hundred "tar heels" were present, in- 
cluding a number of prominent per- 
sons. The society holds its annua) 
banquet at Ranscher's on the 18th of 
this month, at which Dr. E. A. Alder- 
man, Secretary Daniels, Senator Over 
man, Representative Page and otherr 
are expected to make addresses. 

Mrs. Page, wife of Ambassador Wal- 
ter H. Page, of the Court of St. James 
who is visiting Hon. Robt. N. Page 
was given a sp^ially attractive recep- 
tion at the laJfes' congressional clut 
a few days since, to which many in- 
vitations were issued and accepted. 

About forty additions to Mt. Vernon 
church is the result of a month's re- 
vival just closed. W. F. Tomlinson. 

The Hillside, Feb. 5, 1915. 



"I approach you in a worthy cause, 
Mr. Titewadd. We want to raise $100,- 
000. A prominent philantropist offers 
to contribute a quarter of that." "O, 
well," said Mr. Titewadd hastily, "I 
don't mind giving another quarter. Can 
you change a half?" — Housekeeper. 



Ex-President Talf was out for his 
afternoon walk in Washington one day 
when a flaxen-haired little girl ran out 
in front of him, held up her finger, and 
exclaimed in a shrill baby voice: "I 
know who you are!" The President, 
thinking it not at all unusual that she 
should possess this information, but 
willing to gratify her, asked: "Well, 
who am I?" "Aw," she said teasingly, 
"you're Humpty-Dumpty." — Every- 
body's. 



"Now, if I were only an ostrich," 
began the man at the breakfast table 
as he picked up one of his wife's bis- 
cuits, 'then" — "Yes," interrupted the 
patient better half, 'then I might get a 
few feathers for that old hat I've worn 
for three winters." — Chicago News. 



Destroyed by 
Lightning, Saved 
by Insurance 

That Is the story ot many 
Churches, and yet many are 
damaged or destroyed — and 
no insurance whatever. 
This latter number Is de- 
creasing and has been since 
our 

Methodist Mutual, 
HM The National Mutual 
Church Insurance 
Co,, of Chicago 

began to Impress upon 
church officials the lmrx>rt- 
ance of Insurance and suf- 
ficient Insurance, and-to fur- 
nish it on such terms that 
none could afford to put It 
off. Just thins of It! Pro- 
tection for a few cents or 
less a day on easy payments, 
and no assessments. Write 
tor particulars. 

Henry P. Mag-ill, Sec. and Mgr., 
Insurance Exchange, Chicago 

Mrs. Alice Hargrove Barclay, 
aeentM. E. Cbarrh Sontta 
814 Norton BaUdlng 
Foartb and Joffaraon, Loalirllle, Kj. 



GARTSIDE'S IRON RUST SOAP CO., 
4054 Lancaster Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Gartside's Iron Soap (U. S. registered 
patent No. 3477) removes iron rust, ink 
and all unwashable stains from cloth- 
ing, marble, etc., with magical effect. 
Good seller, big margins. House-to- 
house agents and store salesman want- 
ed. The original, 25c a tube. Beware 
of infringements and the penalty for 
making, selling and using an infringcil 
article. Suitable for church fairs. 



SAVE YOUR MEAT 
— From Skippers — 

l sr. 0 II AMBERS ASTI-SKIPPER COMPOUND 
One package is guaranteed to keep skippers 
and other insects from Fl?e Hundred Pounds 
of Cured Meat. Keeps meat clean and sweet. 
Price 50c. per package, by mail, postpaid. 
CHAMBERS-GODFREY MFG. CO. Martin. Tcnn. 



The Newest Styles of Jewelry 

WATCHES, STERLING SILVER 
AND PLATE WARE 

Clocks that will run and a largo as»«rt- 
ment of Fine Pocket Books, Cut Oia»«- 
ware and Ornamenta We are ttw olden! 
leading firm In the city. Evoryt.hinn', guns- 
anteed. 

SCHIFFMAN JEWELRY CO. 

UFA PING IFWULfov 




The Chinese 
Wool flower 



The three most popular 
garden flowers the world 
over were all named and 
introduced by us within the 
past 20 years (the Golden 
Glow, Hybrid Cosmos and 
Gladiolus Childsi America) 
a record without a parallel. 
This year we add to the trio 
another novelty equally 
unique, equally valuable 
and of surpassing: brillian- 
cy. It will find its way 
over the world as quickly 
as the others did and take 
its place eveiy where as the 
foremost garden annual. 

The Chinese Woolflower Is aCeloslaof new form 
and easy growth, two feet high with a score of 
branches each crowned with a great crimson ball of 
wooly substance which holds Its color and beauty all 
through the season making it the most Interesting, 
novel and showy of all garden or pot annuals. 

Price 20 cts. per pkt. of 40 to 50 seeds; it plits, 
for 50 Cts., together with New BLUE PETUNIA and 
GIANT SUMMFR COSMOS freefor trial and Catalog. 

Our Biff Clltnlofflie of Flower'and Veg: Seeds, Bulbs, 
Plants and rare new Fruits free to all who apply. We are the 
largest growers In the world of Gladiolus, Cannas, Dahlias, 
Lilies, Iris, etc,, and our stocks are best and cheapest. 

JOHN IXWIS CHILDS. Floral Park. N. V. 



Page Twelve 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 11, 1915 



The Sunday School Lesson 



FIRST QUARTER— LESSON VII 
FEBRUARY 14, 1915 



Samuel Called to Be a Prophet. 1 Sam 
1. 24-28; chapter 3 



Golden Text — Speak, Jehovah; for 
thy servant heareth. I Sam. 3. 9. 



Summary of the Lesson 

,f You hear only what you under- 
stand" is a brief and epigrammatic 
way of saying that it is perfectly pos- 
sible to hear words without hearing 
ideas; it is perfectly possible to hear 
sounds without detecting meanings 
When the voice divine spoke in the 
house of God Eli heard neither words 
nor ideas, but the fresh and respon 
sive ears of Samuel heard the voice, 
and it was he who was called to be 
the mouthpiece of Jehovah in a try- 
ing and perplexing age. The very first 
message given to Samuel was sharp 
and stern with judgment. He was 
trained for a prophet's career by be 
ing brought very early into the pres- 
ence of life's moral verities and life's 
moral tragedies. As a boy and as a 
man Samuel was the kind of person 
to whom God can speak. 

The Voice 
"Earth's crammed with heaven, 
And every common bush afire with 
God, 

But only he who sees takes off his 
shoes," 

wrote Mrs. Browning in a mood of 
noble inspiration. It was her way of 
saying that sight is useless without 
insight. Celestial significances are de- 
tected only by the heavenly minded. 
This is true not only in the realm of 
sight, but also in the realm of sound. 
The world is full of subtle, wonderful 
voices if our ears are tuned to catch 
their music, and in our hearts the one 
great voice is ready to speak if we 
are willing to listen to its behests. 

"We must not allow the fact that the 
voice divine has been articulate in a 
unique and dominant way at some crit- 
ical times in the working out of the 
plan of God to rob us of the sense that 
in a genuine fashion God's voice is 
ready to speak to every man who will 
find an hour of silence and bring into 
it a listening soul. It is true of many 
a man that his thoughts make so much 
noise in his mind that he can not hear 
the voice of God. There is a profound 
ethical quality to the silence of the lis- 
tening soul. It is the quiet of a stern 
control where the fiery steeds of de- 
sire and selfishness are held still and 
steady by a firm hand. It is the quiet 
of a surrendered will, ready to obey 
the behests of God. It is the quiet of 
a powerful purpose passionately eager 
to know and to do God's will. It is a 
silence full of potentiality and electric 
with vital energy. In such a silence 
the voice of God in all its gentle still- 
ness and royal power is heard speak- 
ing to the soul. 

'We often speak of a man with his 
ear to the ground when we describe an 
astute and understanding politician, 
who knows how to keep in touch 
with the most subtle movements of 
thought and conviction among his con- 
stituents. We should more often speak 
of a man with his ear to the sky when 
we think of that sincere and noble 
seeking for divine direction which 
waits and listens amid all life's con- 
fusions for the voice of God. 

The Man Who Did Not Hear 

A world-famed singer was rousing the 
most extraordinary enthusiasm in a 
great American city. The audience 
gathered in a large music hall was 
fairly rapturous in its applause. As 
the voice with all its subtle, wonderful 
cadences and its rich, deep melodious- 
ness rolled out, one man sat In the 
midst of the spell-bound audience with 



a frown upon his forehead and a look 
of bewilderment over his whole face. 
He had no ear for music and he wTs 
dully wondering what it was all about. 
There was something positively uncan- 
ny about the way in which all these 
people were wildly applauding a per- 
formance which had absolutely no 
meaning for him. He sat in the concert 
hall through the evening, but he went 
home that night without hearing the 
great singer. 

Eli did not hear the voice of Jeho- 
vah. He had no ear for the voice di- 
vine. It was not that, he was a delib- 
erately bad man. In fact, he was a 
man of much piety and in many re- 
gards a very good man indeed, but 
there was a secret of courageous sin- 
cerity which his life bad never known. 
There was a fine moral venturesome- 
ness in the name of the highest and 
best, to which his nature was quite 
foreign. There was a brave inner in- 
tegrity of spirit to which he had never 
been equal. And so, though he was a 
man of actual piety and the best in- 
tentions, his ears had not the power 
to detect the voice of God. 

'There are many men who give us 
the sense of what Professor William 
James called second-hand religious ex- 
perience. They have a genuine rever- 
ence for reality and the kindliest feel- 
ings for all noble things, but they have 
never dared to meet reality alone in 
the dark. Such men at last lose the 
power for first-hand contact with truth. 
They become perpetual echoes. The 
second generation of such men are 
echoes of echoes, and so the process 
goes on until the sense of reality is 
quite lost. 

The world has suffered immeasur- 
ably from religious leaders who have 
lost the power to hear the divine voice. 

The Boy Who Heard 

In one of his poems Longfellow used 
as a refrain some lines from an old 
Lapland song, containing the words, 
"the thoughts of youth are long, long 
thoughts." I think it was Hawthorne 
who wrote, "Children can understand 
anything but hypocrisy." The notable 
thing about the Samuel story which 
we are now studying is that so young 
a boy was pushed into the serious 
movement of life and brought face to 
face with its moral failures and tragic 
experiences. It seems suggested that 
God takes chidhood very seriously and 
is ready to treat it with respect and 
allow it to share in a knowledge of 
His purposes. It is important that we 
remember in this connection the 
glimpse we are given in the New Tes- 
tament of the boy Jo.sus in the tem- 
ple, eagerly questioning the doctors 
and full of interest in the things of 
God. 

Of course all this does not mean 
that childhood is constantly to be kep 
pitched to the key of life's serious and 
solemn experiences. Samuel was no 
doubt a very normal, human boy, with 
all a boy's usual experiences. He was 
the while hearing supernatural voices 
and listening to messages of extraor- 
dinary significance. He had his mo- 
ments when he rose to this height, 
but he had his hours and days of the 
everyday experiences of growing boy- 
hood. 

That a boy, with all his restless, care- 
less moods, has moments of the most 
wonderful outreach and upreach, which 
he dimly understands, and is fearful to 
express, is a thing we are just begin- 
ning to understand. These are the 
moments which should be seized and 
interpreted to him and filled with no- 
ble moral and spiritual content and 
put in control of his life. The posses- 
sion of such moments is the demon- 
stration of a boy's capacity to hear 
the voice divine. 

Samuel's boyhood was utilized by 



God because that boyhood had open- 
ness of mind and heart, the simple 
trusting spirit and the dawning spirit- 
ual desire which made it capable of 
receiving and transmitting a divine 
message. 

The Sin of Tolerance 

It is very difficult not to judge Sen- 
eca by some things which Nero did. 
The great philosopher was doubtless 
a restraining influence on the impet- 
uous and brutal monarch, but the re- 
quirements of his position necessitated 
concessions to Nero which the admir- 
ers of Seneca find distasteful enough. 
The problem does not invole any 
crimes which Seneca ever committed. 
It involves the matter of crimes which 
he tolerated. 

Sentence of judgment was pronounc- 
ed upon Eli not because of sins which 
he had committed, but because of sins 
of which he had been tolerant. When 
his sons entered upon evil ways "he 
restrained them not." To Samuel was 
given a stern and terrible message for 
Eli because of the evil which he had 
not opposed and put down 

The principle involved seems to be 
that you are guilty of the sin which 
you permit. You are a partner in the 
evil you did not prevent Responsi- 
bility is not merely individual. It is 
social. A man may be individually in- 
nocent and socially guilty. He may 
be individually a saint and socially a 
sinner. 

Doubtless this is a principle which 
must be stated with great care and 
one which has real qualilcations. There 
are so many bad things in the world 
that a man could not fight them all if 
he did nothing else, but this is no 
reason why he should refuse to fight 
any one of them. It becomes a mat- 
ter of moral perspective. Eli did not 
face his responsibility for matters with 
which he was as closely connected as 
the conduct of his sons. He did not 
understand the moral solidarity of the 
family. He sinned by what he toler- 
ated and not by what he did. 

No more perplexing series of ques- 
tions rise before the mind of the mod- 
ern Christian than those suggested by 
the evils which are all about him. 
Where shall he do battle? In what mat- 
ters shall he be silent? What should 
he fight? And what should he ignore? 
The developing of an adequate social 
conscience is one of the outstanding 
tasks of Christendom. — Lynn H. Hough 
D. D., in N. Y. Christian Advocate. 



RECIPE FOR GRAY HAIR 

To half pint of water add 1 oz. Bay 
Rum, a small box of Barbo Compound, 
and M oz. of glycerine. Apply to the 
hair twice a week until it becomes the 
desired shade. Any druggist can put 
this up or you can mix it at home at 
very little cast. Full directions for 
making and use come in each box of 
Barbo Compound. It will gradually 
darken streaked, faded gray hair, and 
removes dandruff. It Is excellent for 
falling hair and will make harsh hair 
soft and glossy. It will not color the 
scalp, is not sticky or greasy, and does 
not rub off. 



TREE PLANTING TIME 

The last half of February is a good 
time for spring planting. Do not wait 
too long; other things can wait, but 
not this. Get your order in at once. 

Apples, Pears, Peaches, Plums, 
Grapes, Berries, Pecans; complete as- 
sortment ripening through the season. 
Also Flowering Shrubs, Roses, etc., to 
make the home ground attractive for 
the children. 

Some special bargains in surplus ap- 
ple and peach in lots of 300 and over 
for spring shipment. 

HOWARD NURSERY CO., 
Box K210 Stovall, N. C. 



81 VMVCD TOLIEEOTHEB BELLS 

t- I IV1 I CO /gS^i DWEETEE, MORE DDE- 
rHURCH ABLE LOWEE TEICE. 

" _ eKSskODEFEEECATALOatJE 
3SSXj|XjJ5».^ r TELLS why. 
to Cincinnati Bell Foundry Co., Cincinnati, 0. 



BEAUTIFUL 
FLORAL 
DESIGNS 

Furnished on short, notice 




Summit Avenue Greenhouses 
HOWARD GARDNER 

Proprietor 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Office Phone 571 Res. Phone 1345 



DR. C. W. MOSELEY 

DISEASES OF 
STOMACH AND INTESTINES 



121% So. Elm St., Greensboro, N. C. 



THIS SPACE BELONGS TO 

ROBT. W.MURRAY 

GENERAL 

INSURANCE 

Greensboro, North Carolina 
308i/ 2 South EF*i St. 
Phone 163 



FREE 

To every farmer of 
Guilford County who 
will mail us a postal 
card asking for an 

HOMESTEAD 
ALMANAC 

we will mail one abso- 
lutely free to each ad- 
dress, as long as the 
present supply lasts. 

Besides the regular 
information contained in 
almanacs this Home- 
stead Almanac contains 
many interesting things 
that a farmer likes to 
know. 

ODELL 

HARDWARE CO. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



February 11, 1915 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Thirteen 



I Our Little Folks' Department 



VALENTINES 

Ellen D. Masters 
The wind was blowing down our street 

And it was snowing some; 
But I watched from the chilly porch, 

To see the postman come. 

Across the street, to Elsie's door, 

And then I meant to run 
Before she got the valentine — 

I knew that she'd get one. 

I knew it would be beautiful, 
With lace and hearts and things, 

And pretty verses on the leaves, 
And tied with ribbon strings. 

I knew the verses all by heart; 

I knew the bows were pink; 
The hearts were gold; the lace was 
white — 

Oh, what would Elsie think! 

I saw the postman come at last, 

And Elsie at the door; 
She got a valentine, sure'nough — 

I knew she would before. 

And then I hid inside our hall; 

And, when his whistle blew, 
The postman called: "Hello! hello !- 

A valentine for you!" 

Sure 'nough, I got a valentine, 
With lace and hearts and things, 

And pretty verses on the leaves, 
And tied with ribbon strings. 

And I have wondered ever since 
And guessed if Elsie knew 

For sure, I'd get a valentine, 
Before the postman blew. 

Just like I knew that she'd get one 
And knew her verses, too; 

I never s'posed that I'd get one — 
Do you guess Elsie knew? 



A SURE SIGN 

Here's the mail, sort it quick — 
Papers, letters, notes, 
Postcard scenes, 
Magazines; 

Our hearts are in our throats. 

Something there 

White and square, 

Sealed with wax, and bumpy — 

At the edges flat and thin, 

In the middle lumpy? 

When you feel the envelope, 

Do your fingers trace 

Something narrow, 

Like an arrow? 

Or a part 

Of a heart? 

Or a Cupid's face? 

Is your name 'cross the back 

In a crooked line? 

Hurry, then; that's a sign 

Some one's sent a valentine! 

— Nancy Byrd Turner. 



MARGIE'S VALENTINE 



who was two years younger, deter- 
mined to do as well, but, instead, he 
fell. 

The children laughed gaily, but when 
he did not rise, and they noticed how 
white his face had become, they were 
frightened and they called the colored 
man, who chanced to be near. He took 
the little fellow in his arms, and hur- 
ried to the house. A physician was 
called at once, who said Wallace had 
broken his leg, and must remain in 
bed for several weeks. 

The children felt this was a sad end- 
ing to all their Christmas planning. 
Walace was a brave boy, and insisted 
that all should go to grandpa's; his 
mamma only should remain with him. 
On Christmas Eve Wallace received 
such a number of b